Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. Also, Slashdot's Facebook page has a chat bot now. Message it for stories and more. ×

Comment All-In-One likely to be the future norm (Score 4, Insightful) 135

If you bought a chauffeur service you would expect the service to pay the chauffeur, maintain the car, and maintain the insurance. This isn’t much different (other than you own the car). Tesla is large enough to create the shared risk pool that insurance is founded on. Better yet, by also being the insurance it incentives them to make their cars as safe as possible. I don’t image regular insurance companies are too happy about this and will propose various strawman arguments in an attempt to keep Tesla and others from doing this once self-driving cars really get popular. In fact this all in one model is about the only way self-driving cars will be able to work. Self driving cars will only be safe as long as they are always maintained in top condition. Sensors have to be functioning and calibrated. Brakes have to be in good working order to maintain the cars safe expected stopping distance. Software upgrades are needed. Etc...

Once driver error is not the major factor in accidents it just doesn't make sense to keep the old insurance structure as the fault will almost always be with the manufacturer. This does of course reduce the insurance company's incentive (in this case the manufacture) to really go after claims due to negligence, though that will still be a private legal suit option. Let make sure providing the insurance doesn't also take away your right to sue.

Comment Doubt it (Score 0) 62

Alphabet's just upset that they've been messing around with self-driving cars for the better part of a decade and it still doesn't look any closer to a product, and Uber has stolen a march on them by actually _using_ them. If you can't make your product succeed, tearing down the competition is almost as good.

Comment Re:No (Score 1) 91

You have no idea.
I live in Latin America, and living standards in my country are much lower than in the US, but comparable.
We may probably consume like one third, or one quarter the energy you guys do. In some parts of Asia, they may consume like 1/10 or 1/20 of what you do.

They can live without power grid, without internet, without fuel and all that stuff. They do it right now. What you describe would be just business as usual for them.
We can prevail as a civilization with probably 1/10, or 1/100 the resources we currently consume. Just need to dramatically reduce resource consumption, but survival, as a civilization, is probably not an issue.

Comment Re:Costing to the RIAA vrs Ignoring? (Score 1) 81

You grossly overestimate the cost per notice. To the rights holder the cost is basically zero.

Well, the copyright holder first has to determine whether the content is actually infr-- (snicker, choke, guffaw)

Sorry, I just couldn't get that whole sentence out while keeping a straight face.

Comment Third-party exception (Score 4, Informative) 112

In most cases, evidence held by a third party is not protected by the Fourth Amendment. (This is bullshit but it is precedent). I imagine Amazon is going for a novel First Amendment argument here because the Fourth Amendment argument is a loser. I doubt it will get anywhere. I could hope it would make people think twice about bugging their own houses, but they won't.

Comment Re:Leaving a bit out (Score 1) 191

While I do agree the fact that he was fired is significant, you have to wonder what kind of culture is at the company where he thought this was something he could get away with.

Since this was at a "company retreat in Las Vegas", I'm going to guess it had less to do with company culture and more to do with Mr. Grabby drinking too much to worry about consequences.

Comment Leaving a bit out (Score 4, Informative) 191

The boob-grabber got fired, as CNBC fails to note (but BusinessInsider does)

The baseball bat thing is probably a reference to Scarface. Whether a manager actually was referencing the movie when making the "threat" or the person talking to the reporter was using it for inspiration for making shit up, I couldn't say.

Comment DumbSwede Update (Score 1) 20

Sorry about misspelling Ad as Add so many times. I was a bit aggravated and in a hurry posting my rant. I have AdBlock on several other browsers and machines, but the one I'm on now is a company box and I don't use it for as much random surfing as my home box. That said, I've installed AdBlock now and all is well again, though I'm still a little unhappy about having to do this to continue to use Slashdot in a a sane manner. It reminds me of having to specifically choose classic mode when they changed the Mod system. Note, there was a substantial decline in the quality of posts after that change. When you decide the user experience is less important than the Ad revenue it can only lead to decline. Slashdot use to be great because its text dense comment system was fast and you didn't have to have 10Mb download speed. Please don't become like every other overly ad crowded bullshit site out there. Please let us have one forum that reminds of us of some of the simpler and better times on the internet.

Comment OMG fix the banner adds (Score 4, Insightful) 20

I have been a contributer on Slashdot for over 15 years. There have been things to complain about over the years, but FOR GOD SAKE don't let the banner adds chase everyone away. What's more annoying than a Banner Ad? A banner add that doesn't scroll away as you read.

Serious, I will never visit Slashdot again if this isn't fixed ASAP.

Don't be like the thousands of other crap sites that are doing this now. I don't care if it is in the advertisers JavaScript, find somewhat to stop that shit OR I AM GONE!

Comment Re:Innovation (Score 5, Interesting) 359

Linux os not full of innovation.
It's full of great work, executed properly.

I was not a believer. I hated the fact that he was pushing such an outdated design for a kernel.
Yet he proved that great execution of an existing idea is much more valuable and has a much greater impact (worldwide, long lasting impact) than a beautiful, innovative design.

Comment Or Maybe just the opposite... (Score 1) 382

Lithium is more common in Earth's crust than lead. Plus unlike coal and oil, you use it over and over again and can be reclaimed after batteries are no longer rechargeable (or obsoleted by newer technology). Any shortages are just because we haven't ramped up mining/recovery of it. Once demand is really there we will probably extract it from sea water where it is in relative abundance (and fare less destructive than your apocalyptic mining hyperbole would be).

Slashdot Top Deals

Each new user of a new system uncovers a new class of bugs. -- Kernighan

Working...