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Comment Cultural Blindspots ... (Score 1) 124

Every culture has its blindspots.

Arabs for example have a blindspot where all world events are a product of conspiracies by various entities. From real ones (USA, Israel), to quasi-entities ('The West'), to imaginary ones (Free Masonry, World Government, ...etc.) Everything that happens is planned and executed by these entities, from wars, revolutions, downing an airplane (e.g. Egypt Air 990, MetroJet). No amount of reasoning will sway the average Arab that there are other explanations that hold more to logic than the usual suspects conspiring on us.

Today I learned that Chileans have a blindspot for believing in UFOs.

Comment Re: Two NICs yet? (Score 1) 92

Realistically, the J1900 is powerful enough to handle any routing duties a small network will throw at it. VLANs, VPN encryption, packet inspection etc are all fine. The pfSense boards are filled with people using these units with multiple VPN tunnels and getting close to gigabit.

For a home router, unencrypted, running snort and a few other things but with the majority of traffic not VPN? It'll handle gigabit speeds without breaking a sweat.

Comment Egyptians discovered it .. (Score 1) 112

Not scientists, nor Leonadro DaVinci, it was the Egyptians.

Hold on, I am not joking. Egyptians have known that the mesentery is a single connected membrane. Why? Because they use that fat laden membrane from sheep to create minced meat kabob like grilled meatballs. It is called mandil ("handkerchief" or "hand towel").

Here is a video showing it as a full contiguous membrane, and the rest of the recipe if someone is interested.

Comment Kubuntu and (almost) any laptop on sale (Score 1) 288

For the past 10 + years, I have been using Linux exclusively as my desktop environment, and all on laptops. I use Kubuntu 14.04 at present, and have been on the LTS versions for many years.

I only buy laptops that are on sale, whatever is in the flyers the week I need to replace a laptop.

From a 'what works' point of view, most of the laptops I have used have fully worked with Linux. That includes Wifi and sound, the most pesky components. Years ago, one Dell laptop had an issue with Wifi and I had to download something or other to make it work. The last few releases did not need anything special for it to work.

I am writing this from a 2009 Toshiba that works well with Kubuntu 14.04. An older Toshiba (maybe 2006 or 2007) still works fine with the same Kubuntu version.

From a reliability point of view, avoid HP laptops. I had one where the screen hinge decided not to work, and broke, so it is now a special purpose server. Another HP was overheating and we got it exchanged under extended warranty and 3 strikes (sent for repair 3 times for the same issue).

Comment Re:WhatsApp vs the others (Score 1) 56

What you stated is incorrect. There are plenty of other cross platform video calls.

One one them is Facebook Messenger. It works from a browser (even on Linux), and on Android phones. Not sure about iOS though.

The other is Google Hangouts. It also works from a browser (yes, on Linux too), on Android and on iOS.

Skype used to work on Linux (native application, not from a browser), Android, and iOS as well, but has not used it for a while on my Linux desktop.

WhatsApp is not cross platform. It does not work from a browser, and does not have a desktop native application, be that from Windows or Linux. And WhatsApp requires a mobile phone number, and reads your contacts and gathers all info from it, among other things. Facebook and Hangouts do not require a mobile phone number.

Comment Doesn't always work ... (Score 1) 373

Well, your idea does not always work.

First, we have dictators that seem to defy death. Case in point is Mubarak. I was in university when he came to power, and 30 years later, he was still in power, when the revolution erupted, with all the tumultuous aftermath. Oh, and he is still alive at 88 years old! You can also count Ali Abdalla Saleh of Yemen in the same league. Although he was deposed, he is still alive, and meddling with his country's affairs (aided/co-planned the Houthi take over which is still going on, and causing the Saudi shelling).

And then you have those who just hand over the country to a new generation. Hafez Assad died in power, after several brutal decades. His son, Bashar is now the one causing all this misery on his people.

Comment My setup (Score 1) 326

Operating system: Kubuntu 14.04.

Desktop Environment: KDE.

Browser: Firefox, with Classic Theme Restorer, uBlock Origin, NoScript, Cookie Monster and Session Manager with auto save every few hours. I also have Chromium for when Firefox proves to be too restrictive for some sites. I also use Opera and rekonq occasionally.

Editor: vim and has been for decades, even before vim was invented (yes, plain vi on UNIX System V).

Comment Re:YOU HAVE TO GO BACK (Score 1) 278

The Nice attacker "... did not seem overtly religious. Locals said he was often seen drinking beer and never attended the small mosque near his block of flats. ... had been in trouble with police between 2010 and 2016 for threatening behaviour, violence and petty theft. In March, a court in Nice convicted him of assaulting a motorist with an improvised weapon - a wooden pallet ... "

Source: BBC.

The Paris attackers (the two Abdeslam brothers, one who blew up himself, and the other one who was arrested) owned a bar serving alcohol and were not religious either. They did not attend a mosque. There were drugs in that bar too, and neighbours complained.

Source: Business Insider.

Other attackers also got in trouble with the law: petty crime, drug dealing, ...etc.

This seems like a recurring theme with Islamic State now. They don't recruit from religiously observant people, like Al-Qaeda used to do. They recruit ex-criminals, apparently seeking salvation by committing a 'martyrdom act'.

But don't let facts stand in the way of prejudice and preconceived ideas ...

From another immigrant Canadian ...

Comment Would not have helped ... (Score 1) 406

That moron Newt ...

The Nice attacker "... did not seem overtly religious. Locals said he was often seen drinking beer and never attended the small mosque near his block of flats. ... had been in trouble with police between 2010 and 2016 for threatening behaviour, violence and petty theft.
In March, a court in Nice convicted him of assaulting a motorist with an improvised weapon - a wooden pallet ... "

Source: BBC.

The Paris attackers (the two Abdeslam brothers, one who blew up himself, and the other one who was arrested) owned a bar serving alcohol and were not religious either. They did not attend a mosque. There were drugs in that bar too, and neighbours complained.

Source: Business Insider.

Other attackers also got in trouble with the law, petty crime, drug dealing, ...etc.

This seems like a recurring theme with Islamic State now. They don't recruit from religiously observant people, like Al-Qaeda used to do. They recruit ex-criminals, apparently seeking salvation by committing a 'martyrdom act'.

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