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Comment Re:Unimpressive performance. (Score 2) 122

Scan through a big folder of 20MP+ photos, what happens to your application cache? Quite possibly evicted.

Intel is probably smart enough to use a hybrid MFU technique rather than MRU. They might set aside a portion or percentage for MRU to speed up ongoing operations, but I don't think they're dumb enough to run the whole cache on that basis.

Comment Re:Er - I'm awake and notice this (Score 2) 191

The easiest way to see price discrimination is to go to the rich side of town and go to the grocery store. Observe the price of milk, hamburger, cheese and gasoline. Now to to the poor side of town, repeat.

OK, I'll bite. The poor side of town has a Grocery Outlet and a local market called a Bruno's. The expensive side of town (such as it is) has a Safeway. Guess what? The prices are better on the cheap side of town. What were you trying to prove again? (Also, our Safeway is fucking disgusting. About half the time you walk in there, you can smell the fish counter... ACROSS THE STORE. And sometimes it's gackworthy. I wouldn't even go in there if my landlord's bank weren't in there.)

What I do notice is that gasoline is often cheaper in more affluent neighborhoods. But that's because those people are willing to drive to somewhere else to fuel up. It's not magic.

Comment Re:Progress (Score 1) 134

Slashdot is making progress. I'm glad to see a discussion on electric cars on this forum where no-one is whining "electric cars will never work, you can't go more than 200 miles without needing to refuel... customers don't want electric..." etc,etc,et.

Yes, it is truly sad how many Slashdotters are so vastly behind the times. They should really fuck off back to CNET where they apparently came from

Comment Re:Okay, but... (Score 1) 134

The US should do similar to put an end to all of these competing charging formats and vertical markets. It's not like Tesla will lose out because they stand to profit regardless of which vehicle is charging at their stations.

You are Just Plain Wrong. The Supercharger network is a competitive advantage. Since no one else offers that, and no one else can charge at those points, as long as Tesla has it and nobody else does, it is a significant inducement to buy Tesla instead of something else. Thus, this is the time for Tesla to lobby against such a move. When other makers have similar networks, then Tesla will want to lobby for charge connector standardization, because that will force them to let Tesla customers use any charger. Once it's no longer a competitive advantage, then it becomes a drawback. Right up until then, it's a massive benefit and they would have to be total idiots unqualified to operate any business to change that part of their game plan.

Comment Re:Verizon (Score 1) 187

I take trips with my buddies each year where we fly to a big airport and drive around 1500-2000 miles round trip from there into rural areas on back roads.

We are a great cross-section of providers with Tmo, ATT, Sprint and VZW. I was the only one with service for the entire trip the last two times (NE states and NW states). ATT was next best. Sprint was the worst and Tmo was next.

My family takes a ~3000 mile road trip every summer. I've only been out of service once or twice in 7 years and those were in rural areas of Alabama or Oklahoma (IIRC).

I wouldn't give up VZW for anything.

Comment Re:If the NSA wasn't evil (Score 2) 158

They would immediately tell Intel, Microsoft, and Mr Torvalds exactly what flaws they are exploiting so they could be closed. Instead, being the evil assholes they are, they won't tell anyone. Cuz we all know the NSA is smarter than the Chinese, Russians, and random hacker groups who exploit the same holes.

I guess it's a difference of philosophy. I want my computing to be as secure as possible. The NSA wants to hack anyone's system at anytime.

My philosophy is comment sense, the NSA's is pure evil considering it lessens my security.

Wrong. The government is ordering to put the flaw in!! If Snowden is correct under the American Patriot Act they can arrest those who do not comply making their products with backdoors so the government doesn't have to get a court order.

To me that is pure evil. You think Apple and Android LOVE putting in hidden apps that secret turn your phones into recording devices that send the GPS and conversations wihtout you knowing while appearing off?

Comment It makes sense (not in a bad way) (Score 1) 33

Reason being is Salesforce is kind of scaring me as too powerful and a threat to I.T. jobs.

If it is cross platform which MS is heading too we can put down the hate on MS like its 1999 still. From what I gather is it is not ads, but rather MS won the desktop wars by integrating and doing proprietary tricks to link stuff together ALA Visual Basic COM objects. You had everything tie together.

Today in 2017 Windows is not longer the guerala. But MS is hardly dead in the workplace. So instead of integrating components and doing proprietary standards they are doing open standards with TypeScript, .NET, Android in Visual Studio, SQL Server for Linux, Powershell for Mac/Linux, and MS Code editor for Linux, and embracing Linux Vms, and even making MS Code available for Linux and Mac. Their browsers are all fully W3C compliant now and Office 365 is the reason why.

So MS is doing the data and service integration instead. If the company owner, your employees, and yourself all use LinkedIn, Yammer, and other tools which run on multiplatforms it gets rid of a reason to use Salesforce.com.

MS maybe getting too powerful in this area but Office 365 is rapidly getting more apps and mobile programs like Dwell, PowerBI, etc. LinkedIN is the glue that ties this together to keep business to business relationships on the ecosystem ... rather than crappy COM win32 standards.

Comment Re:I like functions... (Score 1) 394

It's quite a bit more than that, at least if you're talking about pure functional programming. You also have to get rid of most all of your old notions of flow control. Imperative programming is about defining sequences of steps, some of which are conditional. Functional programming is all done with nested transformations; there are no sequential steps, there are no branches, there is no iteration.

If you think about it, those are inevitable consequences of the constraints I mentioned. However, it's good that you highlighted them.

If this sounds freakish and impossible to someone raised on imperative programming paradigms... yes, it is. Functional programming requires thinking in an entirely new way.

Yep, both recursion and constructs like map/filter are incredibly useful (even in procedural/OO languages) once you get the hang of them.

Comment Agreemsg (Score 1) 146

It's more of a flying motorcycle, except without any of the advantages of a motorcycle. Presumably the advantages of being able to fly outweigh them, but if you're only allowed to operate over water, you'd probably be better served by a boat. It's a toy. The only time it seems like it would have any actual utility is if you live in some place where you're not allowed to move quickly on the water, but they'd still allow you to operate one of these. Which I suppose could exist... somewhere?

Comment I couldn't get past "how do you write a game"? (Score 5, Interesting) 394

When I was learning about functional programming in college, I got about as far as learning about the avoidance of side effects, at which point I started asking myself, "how would one write a video game in an FP language if you're not supposed to e.g. update the player's on-screen position in response to a keystroke"? The answer I got was to either generate an entire new game-state for each update (which seemed unwieldy), or work around the problem using monads, which admittedly I never really understood. I went back to procedural programming since that looked like the more straightforward way to implement the kinds of programs I wanted to write.

My question now is, do people ever actually write video games using functional programming? And if so, how would an FP-based arcade-style video game realistically handle things like updating the state of the player and the monsters at 60fps, as the game progresses?

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