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Comment Let's be clear (Score 1) 329

The Constitution applies to the U.S. government and to the citizens of the united states. It does not include geographic limitations of any kind. All of this making borders a Constitution free zone is completely unConstitutional. I don't care if the ground I am standing on is legally considered to be the Greater 2nd Empire of Mars, I am still a U.S. Citizen and the border guard is still a representative of the U.S. government. The Constitution applies. Obviously it isn't being respected, but it certainly applies.

Comment Re:Nope (Score 2) 104

First off, that whole 15 minutes thing is absolute bullshit. Maybe its a worst case if you were in truly deep thought over one of the hardest problems of the year. But most of the time you aren't, and it will be a few minutes Like around 1.

YMMV but whenever I'm stuck with half an hour from coming to work to a meeting or between a meeting and the lunch break or whatever I feel that time is exceptionally unproductive. Whether it's making a change or implementing something new or tracking down a bug I usually need some time to work out what it really does, what it should do and how I can do it with good code that's easy to maintain. Most botched jobs happen if I rush that, I can work quick and dirty but it builds technical debt. That I'd be three times as productive if I had an hour (15 vs 45 minutes effective time) doesn't sound too far off to me. I try to have a few "just do it" tasks ready for that, but typically they're not supposed to be my top priority. So if I had a PHB who wants me to work on that task and no other task until I'm done productivity and quality would suffer.

Secondly- your productivity doesn't matter. The team's does. Those interruptions- it means a team member needs help. They're blocked. Their productivity is at or near 0 until unblocked. If interrupting you costs 15 minutes from you but saves an hour for him, that interruption is worth it for the team. There are almost 0 of those interruptions that aren't a net gain.

Depends on how many of these interruptions are from your team and about work, not to mention if they've actually checked and read the documentation or is just asking because bugging you is easier than making the effort themselves. That said, answering simple questions or checking Bob's calendar to see if he's in a meeting doesn't break the flow for me, that I can push/pop off the mental stack. If I need to take 5-10 minutes to check/discuss/explain/investigate/show something though I've decided I'm already distracted so time to check my inbox and answer what I can now before they're at my doorstep. Sadly we're not big enough to have a support staff to shield us from the solutions we've developed so it's DevOps and most the users are one or two floors down.

Comment Re:Your milage may vary (Score 3, Interesting) 104

I personally am much more suited to working in office and can never get anything done at home [...]

I'm the same way. My solution was simple: Go get an office.

There are lots of options for people who don't want to work from home. Personally, I went for the "Executive Suite." I get an office with a window and decent Internet for a little less than $600 per month. There's also a community kitchen and photocopier. It came with a desk and chair--nothing fancy--but I'm not paying extra for them (i.e. I didn't rent a furnished office, they were left by the previous tenant). Needless to say, the company provides the computer and router. I can sit and video chat or IM anyone I need to get ahold of.

Other options are your local coffee shop or co-working type places. While the company I work for doesn't assist me in paying for the space, some will. Also, as I understand it, I can write off my rent on my income taxes.

While the commute from the bedroom to the spare bedroom or living room sounds cool, I like keeping them separate. But my office is about 4 miles from where I live. I can bike, drive, or even walk!

Comment Re:Second Life still has thousands of users? (Score 2) 49

Just for grins you might try reading TFA, and learn something about why it's still popular enough to be profitable for Linden Labs.

Jesus, dude, CHILL OUT!

All he said was he was surprised it was still around, he didn't shit on it and suggest all SL users are neck-beards in their mom's basement, or something (or is that YOU?)

As one who is not involved in SL, it didn't occur to me that unlike MANY MANY similar ideas, it hadn't faded into history for whatever reason. But that's not meant as an insult (as clearly you took it), simply an observation from someone who never got into SL. To each their own.

Comment Re:Simple answer. Dont use SAP. (Score 1) 98

Companies buy off-the-shelf ERP systems so they don't have to manage people like me, but they really end up paying through the nose for it.

Actually it's mostly so they if you get hit by a bus or decide to quit or decide you got them trapped and can demand a 10x salary increase they can get by without you. Sadly there's a lot of well designed custom systems that'll be throw out for no other reason than being very custom and very specific to your needs. The theory is nice, you can use a generic solution and it's just configuration. In practice I've found that you often end up with big limitations and have to work around them. And that can actually cost you a lot more time and effort in the long run than actually making a solution that works they way you want.

Comment Re:Don't work, don't carry (Score 1) 329

If you are taking a trip to somewhere your phone requires roaming charges you should not take your phone with you.

Indeed. In fact, a good thing to do is simply get to where you're going and buy a "burner phone". You can dump it if you choose, or keep it and hand it over to the Brown Shirts when you re-enter the US...

Comment Re:Just another mindless attack (Score 1) 435

What they forget is no one cares what phone Trump uses to tweet from. As long as he has a second phone to keep the classified stuff secure, who cares if he also keeps his personal phone?

FWIW there are document preservation laws he needs to comply with, too.

I know I'll get modded down for being honest here, but I don't care.

"FWIW" is no worth at all. The document preservation laws you mention concern official papers, communications, etc. They do not cover non-government-related, non-classified/non-TS public statements and commentary published openly on a public website. Trump could have 100 phones, tablets, etc etc and post all over the 'net and not be breaking any laws or security protocols.

You lot on the left suffering from Trump Derangement Syndrome are just being pathetically disingenuous and disgustingly dishonest and hypocritical with your Alinsky-ite 'accuse your enemies of exactly what you, yourself do' tactics. It's no wonder people are abandoning the left/Democrats in droves. They can't stand the smell any longer.

But hey, that's what got Trump elected! Keep it up! You'll gift the conservatives control of all 3 federal branches and the entire federal government along with the public's backing to repeal/abolish every leftist initiative instituted in the last 60 years! Good times!

For those who claim to be anti-gun, you sure love your high-caliber, fully-automatic footguns, LOL!

Strat

Comment Re:The smarter thing to do (Score 1) 151

Not that easy, some ROMs straight don't exist except in some display or sales-pitch cartridges.

And yes, as you can imagine, they command insane prices. Collectors are kinda nuts that way. There are generally 3 kinds of games that are rare and hence valuable: Those that only exist in low number because they were just produced for events or to pitch them to investors (e.g. Nintendo World Championships), those that were produced so late that nobody gave half a shit about NES games anymore (e.g. Little Samson) and those that are SO bad that even without the internet word got around that they suck (e.g. Action 52).

So believe it or not, the most valuable games are those that are simply too bad to even play them. Nobody gives you a cent for Mario 3, but you don't even want to know what you'd have to pay to get a real stinker.

Comment Re:TANSTAAFL (Score 1) 154

Laws apply universally, so saying that I care about a law protecting MY property is pointless. It protects everyone's property, I do not enjoy personal protection laws. Unlike a certain group of "property" holders.

You see, that's the problem with the examples presented too many times by proponents of insane copyright laws: Most of them are far fetched and don't translate well into reality. I once, in a discussion, had someone argue that it's "impossible" to produce content the way the users want, despite exactly that being offered by those that copy the content. One really has to wonder whether the reality distortion field comes free with the conviction or whether it already has to be in place to become part of the copyright cult.

Comment Re:TANSTAAFL (Score 1) 154

Sorry, but just 'cause you invest a lot of time and effort doesn't make something valuable. By that logic any sandcastle built by the average 5 year old costs millions. And don't make me ask for money for the space station I built with Lego when I was 10!

Value is what someone who wants something gives it. By definition. You can ask for a price, but if that price is below what I value it, there will be no sale.

What you, as the creator, can attach to a commodity is its cost. Not its value.

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