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Comment Re:But.... (Score 1) 69

what if it causes autism?

We had malaria on the ropes and nearly wiped out. Then the propaganda piece "Silent Spring" with a bunch of bad science, bad data, outright lies, and heartstring-plucking was published and picked up by environmental groups who screamed at the government to "do something!", and so they did. They worked to ban the use of DDT as widely as possible and gave malaria a reprieve. The DDT ban was based on lies and those lies and the ones who knowingly used those lies in their political/ideological causes anyway are responsible for all the deaths, suffering, and economic losses from malaria since then.

Strat

Comment Re:Pilots don't work (Score 1) 246

Will a child growing up in a UBI household have a different attitude towards the need to get a job or attend school? Is there even any point in getting an education if you know that the state will provide everything - and that there probably won't be any jobs for you anyway?

Well we have research on welfare clients here in Norway indicates it might be "inheritable", but not massively so. So I think it would be more "as a child in an UBI society..." and as for the latter I assume basic will mean quite basic. Here in Norway you have a basic guarantee (sosialstønad) if you are a legal resident and have no savings or other means to support yourself, for singles it's 5950 NOK + housing which in USD is about $700/month, but since Norway is more expensive it's effectively $500/month. And housing can easily mean a 100 sqft room with shared kitchen and bathroom facilities.

Essentially if you take your basic needs like food, clothes, personal care, a monthly card for public transportation and misc. household articles the budget is nearly spent. You can afford a microwave, cellphone, a TV, a crap PC and that's it. You're not going to any pubs, cafes, restaurants, concerts, cinemas or theaters. You don't have a car. You're not going on any vacations. You exist comfortably, if all you want is a $15/month WoW subscription. Most people want a little more in life...

Comment Re:Not in my America (Score 1) 226

That is indeed the ideal goal - automation and AI should allow us to achieve a post-scarcity 'Star Trek future' for mankind. However, to transition to this relatively more post-scarcity society requires significant and very careful changes to how society is structured politically. These changes can only be performed successfully by good quality political leadership (ha ha) that has both vision and a good understanding of technology. We simply do not have "good quality political leadership" anywhere in the world right now. This is a major concern. So there will likely be further unrest along the way. This is partly why we're already seeing a rise in leftist-Marxist protesting/unrest.

Comment Re:CEO's fear (Score 1) 226

I'm curious how such a study would define the benchmark of what 'correct' decisions by those CEOs would have been - how could they know? Play out alternative universe simulations in which the CEOs took an alternative decision? That's not possible. Not being facetious, am seriously wondering ... the types of decisions CEOs make aren't easy, and are made with incomplete information - if the CEOs (who have the most information) can't easily make the "correct" decision then how can some random scientist doing some study know the "correct" decision?

Comment Re:FSF = not practical (Score 2) 149

When he started there was no such thing as an entire operating system of free software and no hardware you could run it on. This exists today - it didn't then. It's not as readily and easily available as it should be - but it exists. And, as he rightfully pointed out, if he had compromised the ideal of that existing - it would still not exist at all. It only exists because he never settled for less than that.

Well evil tounges would suggest that without Linus we'd still be waiting on GNU/Hurd. GCC forked off and became ECGS. "Linux libc" forked away from glibc and was only later "gnu-ified" again like ECGS. The rest the FSF made seems mostly to be small utilities, for sure having a GNU/free ls, awk, sed, grep etc. is important but hardly the showstopper. His one (admittedly huge) crowning achievement was writing the GPL, but most the projects seemed to refuse his leadership.

And even then the adoption by some of the core players seemed to be more by chance than ideological success, like Linus primarily wanted to see what other developers were doing to learn so he could run it on his box. User freedom was never a big deal for him nor most other Linux kernel core developers, which is why the GPLv3 was met with a "meh". X11 and Wayland doesn't use the GPL. Apache isn't using the GPL. Android isn't using the GPL except the kernel. It is popular? Yes. Is it the only commonly used open source license? Very far from it.

According to Black Duck GPLv3 + LGPLv3 + Affero GPL = ~10% of all projects and GPLv2 + LGPLv2 ~20% so most projects haven't really been following Stallman since 2007. And that's not counting the non-GPL licenses, my impression is that the Apache license has gained a lot of popularity particularly with corporations like Google (Android), Apple (Swift) and Microsoft (ASP.Net). The kernel is the one project that seems to get away with copyleft because you can run any userspace on top. And because it doesn't really crack down on shims and driver blobs.

Comment Not really (Score 1) 360

I work far more with SQL than programming languages really, but I do work a lot with doing operations on large data sets so I definitively try to avoid looping through a million rows. I use in-memory or temp tables to chain operations without storing state. And that's all neat and well, but without a ton of state in between those set operations to say what's ready, what's running, what's done etc. I'd go nuts. The functional bits are the stretches between the state almost like barriers in computer shaders and other synchronization methods. A pure functional application well I couldn't really imagine it unless it read one file as input and spit out a result, it just flows through the whole application. Every time I try to understand state in FP my head hurts.

Comment Re:FSF = not practical (Score 1) 149

Stallman is more like the kind of political extremist who would tell everybody not to vote because it perpetuates the system. He doesn't force anybody to do anything, he only forces himself and suggests to others. Forcing is what he's against.

And how is this not wanting to use the force of law to impose his ideological views on others?

"Instead of the DMCA, which makes it a crime to show people how to break DRM, it should be a crime to make, import or lease or sell devices with DRM," Stallman says. "Both the players and the media. It should be a crime. The executives of the companies that are now pulling the strings of the W3C, they should go to jail for doing DRM. "

Comment Re:Hubris Much? (Score 1, Flamebait) 92

So your proposal is... do nothing?

Since coral polyps are one of the hardiest creatures on the planet, having survived over millions of years through both tropical and ice ages, yes. "Nothing" is the logical and scientifically-sound action to be taken.

Of course, "nothing" doesn't get scientists and universities grants, get corporations government contracts, nor gain politicians more money and power, so expect a massive government-funded program that wastes obscene amounts of people's tax money while accomplishing little, possibly even causing additional problems that the government and scientists can spend even more of your money on.

Strat

Comment Re:In a world (Score 1) 88

where supposedly anyone can 'code', this is the expected result. Why would you expect anything else from cheap inexperienced labor?

There is a "coding" school here in Seattle (I think it's some chain) that will teach you to "code" in 7 or 8 weeks, and then apparently get a $70k job.

I don't believe it, I think they are designed to suck up GI Bill money from veterans.

But at least they are teaching Python...

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