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Comment Re:the CO2 improvements are minor at best (Score 1) 63

> Gassers make just as much particulate, but it's of the most hazardous type, which means their particulate emissions are actually worse than diesel.

That's only true of direct injected gas engines.

Who told you that? That's bullshit. The only way in which DI gassers are worse than other gassers is that they foul their intake valves which have to be expensively cleaned, sometimes including head removal.

Gasoline also has to be refined more than diesel

This isn't true anymore. Diesel is a highly refined product now also. Clean emissions requires clean and homogeneous input fuel and that means more processing.

Not only is it still true (it still takes less energy to make diesel, it just takes more than it used to) but guess what? Automakers are now asking fuel companies to make higher-octane fuels, over 100 on the scale we use in the USA. That's what they need to make cleaner-burning gasoline engines. So gasoline is actually about to get more expensive, both in real dollars and in energy cost.

That car is a rolling smog bank and you are trying to talk about how your input fuel was renewable? Seriously, have you looked at the emissions standards it was required to conform?

That's irrelevant; mine is running nice and clean. It only smokes when you pin it, which even brand new diesels do. And since it doesn't have a catalyst, it puts out nice big fat soot particles that can be trivially swept out of your lungs by your cilia.

They were a joke in the US and a double joke in Europe. It's far filthier than its contemporary gas cars and really bad compares to any modern car of any sort.

And yet, far superior to anything else in the class sold in 1982.

Comment What makes you think I'm trolling? Losing the arg? (Score 1) 52

It's a fact that over and over again device-specific add-ons are ignored. They wind up in bargain bins whether it's tablet-specific keyboard docks or R.O.B. for the N.E.S. Ignore the lessons of history at your peril. Moto G 2nd owner here, in case you think I'm in love with Samsung or something. Anybody else notice they're now stooping to infomercials?

Comment Re:VISA program is GOOD. H1B is NOT. It is a joke (Score 1) 240

I work for Google and there are constantly great Ph.D. theses where we hire the inventor to integrate their thesis work into our products. Here's an example of an area that can have major impact on our products and at the same time there is typically one person out there (the Ph.D. student) who knows the topic well and understands all small nuances of it.

Google has offices all over the world, so this is a ridiculous argument at best. Even if you did need them to be face to face, there's no need for anything more than a temporary work visa for that purpose. Got any better explanations than that one?

Comment Re:The Verge is 100% wrong (Score 1) 52

History has also shown us that most new ideas fail. Even good ideas.

I agree that the idea of accessories per se, attractive as it is to me, isn't enough to make a product a success these days. However I should point out that back in the day of PDAs it was normal for mobile devices to have a CF or SD slot that could also be used to add features. This was in the day when mobile devices didn't have cell data connections, GPS or even wi-fi, and it was quite common for people to add memory cards, wi-fi, bluetooth, and GPS. I have a box full of accessory cards in my attic.

Handspring, a company that made Palm Pilot clones, initially did very well with their Springboard modules which allowed you to add any kind of functionality to the base system, just like what we're talking about here. Then a few years after introducing the Springboard module Handspring stopped making PDAs altogether in favor of what was then called a "converged device" -- aka a smartphone -- without the slot. It's all about timing; Handspring was perhaps a little ahead of the curve on convergence, but a lot of manufacturers were getting pushed that way because of falling hardware retail prices made it attractive to put more stuff in the base device to keep the price high.

The standard inclusion of GPS + Cloud + Camera + Bluetooth built-in means that there really isn't a need to physically connect a device to a mobile device. The only exception is battery; there is a real need for a more elegant and secure way to extend the operation of a smartphone than plugging it into a powerbank via USB.

But I may be wrong. Maybe there's a compelling use case for a modular architecture that I just haven't thought of yet. That's why I like to see vendors trying something different, although I usually expect them to fail. I've watched tech long enough to realize that success isn't just about an idea being right, it has to come at the right time.

Comment Re:The Verge is 100% wrong (Score 2) 52

Not only is this a viable play-book for Moto, it's exactly what they should do in order to not become part of the "value" market on the clearance shelf.

History has shown us that statistically nobody buys expensive accessories for electronic devices, not least because they are never compatible for long. So no, it's a stupid waste of time. Also, Moto is already part of the value market. They make cheap-ass Motos as tracfones.

Comment Re:Old stuff "discovered" by the ignorant (Score 1) 439

While I don't necessarily disagree with you, let me point out that orthodox economic models are also based on assumptions that are not entirely true. For example you don't necessarily assume that any one agent (e.g. the central planner) has all the information relevant to making decisions, but you do assume that all relevant information is available to parties making decisions about transactions they'll take part in. That's not true, but it's close enough to being true that the models have practical utility. Oh, and there's the bit about people being rational in their decision-making.

Comment Re:Question (Score 1) 439

Because believe it or not, while working sucks, not working also sucks. You don't know how much you get out of work until you don't have it anymore, and I mean stuff beside money: social interaction, purpose, challenge, someplace to go and someplace to look forward to take a vacation from.

In Sweden they're offering an intriguing compromise: work less, or more precisely work for fewer hours, which isn't precisely the same thing.

Comment Re: Wow... (Score 1) 219

That statement should disqualify you from driving a car.

Right back at you:

While pedestrians are supposed to behave, it's YOUR responsibility to make sure that you never drive in a way that makes it possible for you to run over a pedestrian (or hit other cars, for that matter).

While it's my responsibility to minimize that risk, the law recognizes the impossibility of doing that. It sets specific standards where necessary, such as in the case of motorists passing cyclists in California. In other cases, it is deliberately vague to give leeway specifically for the purpose of assigning fault to the party whose fault it actually is (or for other more malign purposes like selective enforcement, but those are outside the scope of this comment.)

The law recognizes the impossibility of completely eliminating accidents, whether between a vehicle and a vehicle, or a vehicle and a pedestrian. It sets speed limits accordingly, so that even if a pedestrian (or motorist) does something stupid, they will hopefully not die. Let's be clear, though; the law recognizes that physics is a thing, and that a person can change direction more rapidly than a car. We don't make the driver automatically responsible in every situation because if we did, nobody would effectively be able to drive. Instead, we make pedestrians responsible for their behavior in many cases. In most of the US, and apparently in most of the world, jaywalking laws exist which make it illegal to cross the road without consideration for safety. Even in DC, where you don't need to use a crosswalk, it's still explicitly illegal to enter the roadway even in a crosswalk when an oncoming vehicle cannot stop for you. Note that the law does not specify a car traveling at legal speeds, or traveling with the light, et cetera. The driver might well be found at fault in a collision with a pedestrian who stepped out in front of them while speeding, but the pedestrian would still be cited for entering the roadway illegally. The goal of the law is to reduce accidents because they are inconvenient to others, not to be fair.

Oh hell, why am I wasting time. It's not "OK" to hit someone at 25 mph. To wrap it up, I hope you didn't mean what you wrote :)

To wrap it up, you misused quotation marks. I didn't say it was OK to hit someone at 25 mph. You're wasting time because you are an idiot who doesn't understand the argument.

Comment Re:VW needs a bankruptcy "fix" ready (Score 1) 63

Clearly you are confusing VW with Toyota, who are still the world's biggest automaker.

They are neck and neck, and VW employs more people due to all the marques they own.

I can't comment on the rest of your manifesto, other than to say I have no idea why you are so interested in how the Phaeton was destined to be a phailure from the beginning.

It's interesting because it's Ferdinand's fault, like everything else wrong with VW today. Germans love a hardass, though, and that's how they got him in the big chair. And what else is interesting about it is just how spectacularly stupid it was when they already had a car in that space. But what's relevant about it is that they have money to burn.

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