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Comment Re:Profit (Score 1) 28

Make $196m illegally. Pay $88m fine. That's $88m profit. What's the incentive to stop doing these things again?

About 25 years ago, I moved from one city to another in search of work and continued to collect unemployment insurance for about 3 months longer than I was entitled while I got my feet under me - my first and only ever violation and I've never been on unemployment or welfare since.
About 2 years later, the gubmint caught up with me. First was full repayment, then a fine assessed at FIVE times the gross amount I "stole" AND a stipulation that any unemployment payments I were to receive in the next 3 years would be reduced by 25%.

Comment Re:Google, Motorola, Intel . . . (Score 1) 203

Every GOP dominated state has severely failing economies. See Kansas as a perfect example.

Define "failing". Red states, by and large, have lower economic growth because they are more rural, and urban centers generate more economic activity. That's a generality, though. If you look at a list of states by GDP per capita, some red states rank very highly. https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Li....

If you're talking about fiscal responsibility, it's pretty much exactly the opposite of what you say. The states that are on the edge of bankruptcy are nearly all blue states, while those with the healthiest governments are red states. https://www.mercatus.org/state...

Kansas, BTW, is firmly middle of the pack on both measures. Kansas is #25 of 50 in terms of GDP per capita, and according to the Mercatus rankings, they're #27. So Kansas isn't a perfect example.

Comment Re:Well... (Score 1) 101

No, what he is referring to is that you get into a command shell, you can invoke an unsigned PowerShell script with PowerShell.exe -file. But that's not much different than source in bash.

But it's hard to imagine a social engineering attack that would get a user to download a file and then get them into a CLI session to override execute flags or signing to invoke the script file.

Comment Re:Not that big a leap (but I doubt OOP @ times) (Score 1) 101

This is one of the reasons micro kernels have a much more manageable security model. The problem being microkernels have some performance penalties that, at least in previous generations of CPUs, lead most OS developers to work in monolithic or mixed models. Yes, there are user space device drivers, so there has been a lot of work done to move device drivers a lot further away from Ring 0 and Ring 1, but even this simply makes monolithic kernels even more complex, and complexity is always the enemy of security.

Comment Re:(bash|sh|ksh|zsh) && !PowerShell (Score 1) 101

The kinds of vulnerabilities that PowerShell suffers would be suffered by any operating system that has a fairly comprehensive scripting language. The issue simply is if you can automate OS functions like creating, altering or deleting files and other system resources, someone can write a malicious script that, if run even in an non-super user context, can wreak havoc, but if run in a super user or similar higher access context can lead to enormous damage or to compromised systems. There are ways to mitigate this for both Windows and *nix, but more often than not you have to be proactive about it.

Comment Re:More likely medical practice, not evolution (Score 1) 257

What I considered really interesting was the question: if cesarean became the normal method of delivery for an extended period of time (many generations) could humans end up at a point where natural birth was not possible?

I think it's likely that before too many more generations the normal process will be to grow babies in artificial wombs, and that could eventually make it so that a significant percentage of women become unable to bear children the old-fashioned way. Although we'd lose the evolutionary pressure for wide hips for birthing, it doesn't seem like there are any evolutionary pressures against wide hips, so I don't see why they'd disappear.

Comment Re:People use this? (Score 1) 70

Anyone who defends this convenience-over-privacy should download and print Jihadi-type information, nuke plans, bio-weapons info, etc. through this service and see how long it is before there is a knock on their door.

Sure. Got a link? I have absolutely zero concern about any sort of problem like that.

Comment Re:People use this? (Score 1) 70

I can't believe people willingly send their documents to Google where they will be processed by their systems and stored for however long.

I love it. It's super convenient to be able to print to my printer from any device, anywhere. Even when I'm printing from a computer rather than my phone or tablet, I frequently find that the native print drivers are unreliable and buggy over the network, and especially over Wifi. Not so much that I can't get it to connect and print with a little fiddling but Google Cloud Print just works, every time. As for Google "processing" the documents, (a) I'm fairly certain they don't data mine Cloud Print data and (b) I don't care. Most of what I print I either created in Google Docs or received in Gmail anyway. And even where that's not the case, the only thing Google would do with anything learned from my print jobs is to make better choices about what ads I might find interesting.

However... my printer is an Epson, and it was bootlooping a couple of days ago (I turned it off). I assumed the printer itself was having some problem and was planning to investigate when I have time this weekend. Sounds like I just need to wait for Google to sort this problem out and I'll be good.

Note that I work for Google, though not on Cloud Print. I'm just a (usually) happy user of Cloud Print.

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