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Submission Summary: 0 pending, 10 declined, 1 accepted (11 total, 9.09% accepted)

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Submission + - Intel Subsidiary Fined by US Commerce Department for Crypto Exports (

idontgno writes: It's almost like the good old days: Intel subsidiary Wind River Systems was fined $750,000 by the US Bureau of Industry and Security for exporting crypto to such rogue states as China and Israel. I bet you didn't know that was still illegal.

This hasn't happened in a while, as far as I can tell. Does this mean that crypto's going to be locked up like it was back in the days of 40-bit SSL?


Submission + - 9th U.S. Circuit Affirms Ban of WoW Glider Bot (

idontgno writes: In its judgment yesterday, 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals decided that the World of Warcraft bot software Glider violates the "Anti-circumvention" provisions of the DMCA and cannot be distributed. Oddly, though, it also decided that Glider doesn't actually violate Blizzard's copyrights in the process. So exactly why does the DMCA apply?

Submission + - US Dems fill inboxes with 419 scams (

idontgno writes: Looks like the U.S. Democratic National Party is hosting an unprotected web-based mail sending application which 419'ers are exploiting to get past mail filtering. (In some cases, I guess. I'd blacklist both major political parties, but that's just me.) As reported on The Register (
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Submission + - Bush White House Must Find Lost Official E-Mail

idontgno writes: According to this Associated Press story (which I saw via El Reg, a U. S. District Court has ruled that Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics In Washington (CREW) and the National Security Archive can continue in their lawsuit to force the White House to recover up to 225 days of "lost" official e-mail traffic from 2003. The Administration's position, rejected by U.S. District Judge Henry Kennedy, was that the courts had no authority to order the recovery of the e-mail.

This ruling appears to settle the issue mentioned in this earlier Slashdot story.

On a personal note, I stand gobsmacked that the Administration's argument boiled down to "You're not the boss of me!"

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