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Submission + - FCC hangs a U-turn on Net Neutrality (

kyjellyfish writes: The Federal Communications Commission will propose new rules that allow Internet service providers to offer a faster lane through which to send video and other content to consumers, as long as a content company is willing to pay for it, according to people briefed on the proposals.
The proposed rules are a complete turnaround for the F.C.C. on the subject of so-called net neutrality, the principle that Internet users should have equal ability to see any content they choose, and that no content providers should be discriminated against in providing their offerings to consumers.
The F.C.C.’s previous rules governing net neutrality were thrown out by a federal appeals court this year. The court said those rules had essentially treated Internet service providers as public utilities, which violated a previous F.C.C. ruling that Internet links were not to be governed by the same strict regulation as telephone or electric service.
The new rules, according to the people briefed on them, will allow a company like Comcast or Verizon to negotiate separately with each content company – like Netflix, Amazon, Disney or Google – and charge different companies different amounts for priority service.

Submission + - NYPD's Twitter campaign backfires

An anonymous reader writes: A NYPD community outreach campaign designed to show images of citizens with cops turned ugly quickly when a deluge of images depicting police brutality came in. From the article: 'The responses soon turned ugly when Occupy Wall Street tweeted a photograph of cops battling protesters with the caption "changing hearts and minds one baton at a time." Other photos included an elderly man bloodied after being arrested for jaywalking.' Police Commissioner Bill Bratton says, 'I kind of welcome the attention,' of the #myNYPD project.

Submission + - English High Court bans scientific paper (

An anonymous reader writes: The High Court — England's highest civil court — has temporarily banned the publication of a scientific paper that would reveal the details of a zero day vulnerability in vehicle immobilisers and, crucially, give details of how to crack the system. Motor manufacturers argued that revealing the details of the crack would allow criminals to steal cars. Could this presage the courts getting involved in what gets posted on your local Bugzilla? It certainly means that software giants who dislike security researchers publishing the full facts on vulnerabilities might want to consider a full legal route.

Submission + - Muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillation conclusively shown

Chris Greenley writes: The T2K long baseline neutrino experiment in Japan has just announced conclusive evidence for electron to muon neutrino oscillation at the 7.5 sigma level. (The level needed for discovery is 5 sigma.) This experiment generates a focused beam of electron neutrinos using an accelerating in the J-PARC facility north of Tokyo which is aimed at the massive Super-Kamiokande detector 295 KM (185 miles) away near the west coast of Japan.

This T2K observation is the first of its kind in that an explicit appearance of a unique flavor of neutrino at a detection point is unequivocally observed from a different flavor of neutrino at its production point.

This result clears the way for CP-violation neutrino studies which could show that "regular" neutrinos act differently than their antimatter counterparts, a phenomenon that so far has only been observed in quarks. If neutrino CP-violation is found, it could explain why there is such a large predominance of matter over antimatter in the universe.

Submission + - Hackers Spawn Web Supercomputer on Way to Chess World Record (

DeathGrippe writes: "By inserting a bit of JavaScript into a webpage, Pethiyagoda says, a site owner could distribute a problem amongst all the site’s visitors. Visitors’ computers or phones would be running calculations in the background while they read a page. With enough visitors, he says, a site could farm out enough small calculations to solve some difficult problems."

"With this year’s run on the value of Bitcoins — the popular digital currency — security expert Mikko Hyppönen thinks that criminals might soon start experimenting with this type of distributed computing too. He believes that crooks could infect websites with JavaScript code that would turn visitors into unsuspecting Bitcoin miners. As long as you’re visiting the website, you’re mining coins for someone else, says Hyppönen, the chief research officer with F-Secure.


Submission + - Vegetative state man "talks" by brain scan (

c0lo writes: Severely brain-injured Scott Routley hasn’t spoken in 12 years. None of his physical assessments since then have shown any sign of awareness, or ability to communicate, thus being diagnosed as vegetative (vegetative patients emerge from a coma into a condition where they have periods awake, with their eyes open, but have no perception of themselves or the outside world).

Scott Routley was asked questions while having his brain activity scanned in an fMRI machine. British neuroscientist Prof Adrian Owen said Mr Routley was clearly not vegetative.
"Scott has been able to show he has a conscious, thinking mind. We have scanned him several times and his pattern of brain activity shows he is clearly choosing to answer our questions. We believe he knows who and where he is."

As a consequence, medical textbooks would need to be updated to include Prof Owen's techniques, because only observational assessments (as opposed to using mind-readers) of Mr Routley have continued to suggest he is vegetative.

The professor in an earlier interview functional MRI machines are expensive (up to $2 million), but it’s quite possible that a portable high-end EEG machine, costing about $75,000, can be used at a patient’s bedside.

Phillip K Dick's world is one step closer.


Submission + - First pressure-sensitive, self-healing material developed (

cylonlover writes: Our largest bodily organ is also one of the most remarkable. Not only is our skin pressure sensitive, it is also able to efficiently heal itself to provide a protective barrier between our insides and the world around us. While we’ve covered synthetic materials that can repair themselves or are pressure senstive, combining these properties in a single synthetic material has understandably proven more difficult. Now researchers at Stanford University have developed the first pressure-sensitive synthetic material that can heal itself when torn or cut, giving it potential for use in next-generation prostheses or self-healing electronic devices.

Submission + - X-Ray Laser for creating supercharged particles (

William Robinson writes: Scientists have found way to use X-Ray Laser for creating supercharged particles. The specific tuning of the laser's properties can cause atoms and molecules to resonate. The resonance excites the atoms and causes them to shake off electrons at a rate that otherwise would require higher energies. This could be used to create highly charged plasma.

Submission + - Build a Zilog Z180 CP/M computer ( 1

LaughingRadish writes: "The P112 board was last available new in 1996 by Dave Brooks. In late 2004 on the Usenet Newsgroup comp.os.cpm, talk about making another run of P112 boards was discussed. I decided to step forward. With Dave Brooks blessing and the assistance of others, new boards were fabricated. Those boards too are gone. Still people want P112 kits. I therefore started a Kickstarter project to supply people with kits. These machines nominally run ZSDOS, a GPLed and enhanced CP/M look-alike. Straight CP/M 2.2 is also available as is a flavor of Unix called UZI-180. If you want an easy-to-get-into piece of classic-computing, this is it. You also build it yourself."
The Internet

Submission + - How to Hug a Chicken Via the Internet (

the_newsbeagle writes: Adrian Cheok, a professor of electrical engineering in Japan, wants to invent a "multisensory Internet" that will transmit not just information, but also experiences. To usher in this new age, he started by building a haptic system that enabled him to send a hug to a chicken via the Internet. Next came the "huggy pajama" project, which allowed distant parents to send their kid a goodnight squeeze. Lately he's begun working on sending a taste over the internet with his "digital lollypop" project.
The Internet

Submission + - The Internet Archive Has Saved Over 10,000,000,000,000,000 Bytes Of The Web 2

An anonymous reader writes: Last night, the Internet Archive threw a party; hundreds of Internet Archive supporters, volunteers, and staff celebrated that the site had passed the 10,000,000,000,000,000 byte mark for archiving the Internet. As the non-profit digital library, known for its Wayback Machine service, points out, the organization has thus now saved 10 petabytes of cultural material.

The Periodic Table of Tech 39

itwbennett writes "From calcium in cameras and germanium in CPUs to selenium in solar cells. Here's a look at how every single element in the periodic table is used in common tech products. For example: Scandium is used in the bulbs in metal halide lamps, which produce a white light source with a high color rendering index that resembles natural sunlight. These lights are often appropriate for the taping of television shows. ... Yttrium helps CRT televisions produce a red color. When used in a compound, it collects energy and passes it to the phosphor. ... Niobium: Lithium niobate is used in mobile phone production, incorporated into surface acoustic wave filters that convert acoustic waves into electrical signals and make smartphone touchscreens work. SAW filters also provide cell signal enhancement, and are used to produce the Apple iPad 2."

Submission + - Obsidian funds $1.1mil game development in 24 hours using Kickstarter (

morcego writes: Using Kickstarter, Obvisian Entertainment managed what would seem impossible very little time ago: to raise $1.1mil and fund the development of Project Eternity an isometric, party-based RPG set in a new fantasy world developed by Obsidian Entertainment. And now, to keep things rolling, they are even promising a Mac version if they reach $1.6mil, and even a Linux version at $2.2mil.

Submission + - Will Parallel Code Ever Be Embraced? (

CowboyRobot writes: "Andrew Binstock at Dr. Dobb's has an essay in which he argues "The advent of the many-core era is not going to push developers to write more parallel code. That hasn't happened as we've gone from 1- to 2- to 4- to 8-core processors, has it? Writing parallel code is not the problem. So, let's stop trying to fix it." He suggests the solution is to "scale out" with more processes instead of scaling up with more threads per process. Does this make sense?"

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