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Submission + - Older Workers Adapt To New Technology Just Fine, Survey Finds (cio.com)

itwbennett writes: Those older workers in your office, you know, the one ones you think can't handle dealing with new technology? Turns out, they struggle less with technology than their millennial colleagues. A survey by London-based market research firm Ipsos Mori, sponsored by Dropbox, found that older workers are less likely to find using technology in the workplace stressful and experience less trouble working with multiple devices than the younger cohort. The reason for this might lie in all the clunky old technologies older workers have had to master over the decades. Digital Natives don't know how good they've got it.

Submission + - FAA Confirms: Shooting Down a Drone is a Federal Felony 1

PvtVoid writes: [The FAA is] unequivocally confirming that it’s a federal crime to shoot down a drone, as John Goglia reports in Forbes. Goglia explains the FAA offered this ruling in response to his questions on the topic, citing 18 USC. 32, which “makes it a felony to damage or destroy an aircraft.”

Not linking to Forbes, because, well, Forbes. Here's the Slate.

Submission + - When Google's Chrome Security Warnings Can Do More Harm Than Good (vortex.com)

Lauren Weinstein writes: We begin with a stipulation. Google has world class privacy and security teams. I know many of the Googlers on those teams. There just ain't no better this side of Alpha Centauri. They want what they feel is best for Google's users.

That said, one of Google's institutional weaknesses — improving but still very much present — is (in my opinion) a recurring lack of clarity when it comes to understanding the impacts that some of their design decisions have on ordinary, non-techie users with busy lives that don't necessarily revolve around the nuts and bolts intricacies of these systems.

Last June, in "When Google Thinks They're Your Mommy" — http://lauren.vortex.com/archi... — I noted some concerns regarding how particular aspects of the Chrome browser security model can negatively impact ordinary users.

Today let's look at a specific interesting and current related example ...

Submission + - Backdoor in MVPower DVR Firmware Sends CCTV Stills to an Email Address in China (softpedia.com)

An anonymous reader writes: An IoT security research company has discovered that a DVR model manufactured by MVPower includes a backdoor-like feature in its code that takes a screenshot of your CCTV feed and sends it to an email address hosted somewhere in China. The device's firmware is based on an open source project from GitHub that was pulled by its developer when someone confronted him about the backdoor.

Submission + - ICANN's Ex CEO fronts Chinese inititive on running the Internet

Earthquake Retrofit writes: The Register reports that on the last day of the World Internet Conference in Wuzhen, the conference organizers unexpectedly announced they had set up a new "high-level advisory committee" that would guide the agenda of future conferences and "contribute ideas for the development of the Internet."

The committee has already had its first meeting, the organizers stated, naming ICANN's Fadi Chehade and Alibaba CEO Jack Ma as its founders and noting that it had "invited 31 leading Internet figures from governments, enterprises, academic institutions, and technological communities to be members of the first high-level advisory committee." Those "figures" have not been named but we understand they include government representatives from a number of authoritarian governments, including Russia, and do not include lead names from the internet community.

Submission + - Europe and Russia are headed back to the moon together (examiner.com)

MarkWhittington writes: Russia is turning its attention to the moon again for the first time in about 40 years. The first Russian mission to the moon since long before the end of the Cold War will be Luna 27, a robot lander that will touch down on the edge of the lunar South Pole as early as 2020. Russia is looking for international partners to help make Luna 27 a reality and may have found one in the European Space Agency, according to a story on the BBC.

Submission + - Refreshing the Amiga 1200 With New Plastic

Ichijo writes: Several years ago, the Amiga community developed a way to restore old, yellowed ABS plastic to like-new condition, and put the recipe for the gel, dubbed Retr0bright , into the public domain. But then it was discovered that the effect of the Retr0bright gel is only temporary, and plastic treated with the gel soon reverts to its original yellowed state.

Now, Amiga enthusiast Philippe Lang has started a new Kickstarter campaign to create new, improved molds for Amiga 1200 housings and do a licensed production run using anti-UV ASA plastic in the original color plus black, transparent, and 9 other colors. His team is also investigating the feasibility of producing new Amiga 1200 keyboards if this campaign succeeds. This follows a successful production run by Commodore 64 enthusiasts of new C64c housings using the original injection molds and new C64 motherboards designed with modern ASICs and DC-DC converter technology.

Submission + - Bill allows government to revoke Americans' passports without charges or trial (policestateusa.com)

schwit1 writes: A bill passed by the U.S. House of Representatives would allow the government to restrict Americans' travel through the revocation of passports based upon mere suspicions of unscrupulous activity. This bill represents another dangerous step forward in the war on terror and the disintegration of American due process.

H.R. 237, the "FTO (Foreign Terrorist Organization) Passport Revocation Act of 2015," will allow the U.S. Secretary of State the unchecked authority to prohibit individuals from traveling internationally. According to the bill, the Secretary may unilaterally revoke (or refuse to issue) a passport from "any individual whom the Secretary has determined has aided, assisted, abetted, or otherwise helped an organization the Secretary has designated as a foreign terrorist organization pursuant to section 219 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1189)."

The bill did not bother to define what the terms "aided, assisted, abetted, or otherwise helped" actually mean, in legal terms. The power has been left open-ended so that it can mean whatever the secretary wants it to mean. Needless to say, a bill like this would be easily abused.

The travel restriction requires no presumption of innocence for the targeted individual; no explanation; no public presentation of evidence; no opportunity for a defense; no checks and balances on the power. The bill does not outline any appeals process for the targeted individual. The only stipulation is that the Secretary of State must issue a report to the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations and the House Committee on Foreign Affairs — "classified or unclassified." The bill does not state that either committee can reverse the secretary's decisions.

Submission + - Apple Yanks Nest From Stores in Favor of Fussy HomeKit (programmableweb.com)

linkchaos writes: Late Thursday, news broke that Apple had fully removed Nest products from its retail stores and website. Nest, now owned by Google, includes the Nest camera, thermostat and smoke detector. All three are connected devices for the home that can be controlled via smartphone apps. We're talking about the Internet of Things here, folks, and Nest's products have been popular as long as they've been in the market.

Submission + - Notepad++ Leaves SourceForge (notepad-plus-plus.org)

An anonymous reader writes: SourceForge was a good place; unfortunately, sometimes good places don't last.

Recently SF hijacked its hosted projects to distribute their wrapped crapware:

        SourceForge grabs GIMP for Windows' account, wraps installer in bundle-pushing adware
        Black “mirror”: SourceForge has now taken over Nmap audit tool project
        What happened to Sourceforge? The full story between VLC and Sourceforge

Obviously, the paid component per installation system is one of their important income generating scams. I would be fine with that, if they were the actual owners of the legitimate software. The real problem is, they are polluting these open source software installations for the purpose of filling their pockets by this scam, and worst of all, without even notifying the authors/creators of this software, while the creators are struggling against such parasitic software in order to keep their installers cleaner and safer.

Such a shameless policy should be condemned, and the Notepad++ project will move entirely out of SourceForge.

I humbly request that Notepad++ users not encourage such scams, and educate others not to download any software from SourceForge. I request as well that the project owners on SourceForge move out of SourceForge, in order to preserve the purpose of the Open Source Community and encourage the works of true authors/creators.

Submission + - How Flight Tracking Works: A Global Network Of Volunteers

An anonymous reader writes: If a website can show the flight path and all those little yellow planes in real time, how can they not know where Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 went down? Answering that involves understanding a little about how flight-tracking sites work, where they get their data, and the limitations of existing technologies. It also involves appreciating a relatively new approach that the two large flight-tracking companies, Texas-based FlightAware and Sweden-based Flightradar24 are rushing to expand, a global sensor system known as ADS-B, which broadcasts updates of aircraft GPS data in real time. ADS-B is slowly superseding the ground-based radar systems that have been used for decades, becoming central not only to flight tracking but also to the future of flight safety. And it's powered, in part, by thousands of dedicated aviation hobbyists around the globe.

Submission + - NASA's Abandoned Launch Facilities

trazom28 writes: I ran across an interesting slideshow of NASA's abandoned launch facilities. Interesting piece of scientific history. It is described as images from "photographer Roland Miller's upcoming book, 'Abandoned in Place, titled' "Abandoned Space Graveyard Photos". ‘Abandoned in Place’ is a visual study of the deactivated launch and research facilities that played an essential role in early American space exploration."

Submission + - When Social Betrayal Breaks Your Logins 1

An anonymous reader writes: What do you do when the answers to your security questions are known by someone who dislikes you, such as a stalker or an ex-partner? It's getting hard to remember some of the more obscure factoids about my own life, like where I ate my first reuben sandwich, or things that might change over time, like my favorite TV show. Is it just me or is this a ridiculous security hole? Anyone have good suggestions for workarounds when I'm signing up for a new site?

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