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Submission + - Silver Bonding Could Provide a Simple Way of Producing Smart Fabrics (gizmag.com)

Zothecula writes: Textiles with integrated electrical circuits, commonly referred to as smart fabrics, show a great deal of promise for applications such as clothing with embedded electronics. While previous approaches to producing the fabrics have involved weaving conductive materials into ordinary fibers, a new technique simply coats them with silver.

Submission + - Higher mortgage rates won't hurt recovery, Fannie finds (kcci.com)

danielonesi writes: The study, which compared historic mortgage rates with home price and sales data, focused on two time periods when rates soared. The first, from October 1993 through December 1994, when rates rose to 9.2 percent from 6.8 percent and the second from October 1998 to May 2000 when they climbed to 8.5 percent from 6.7 percent.
China

Submission + - China Builds 30-Story Hotel In Just 15 Days! (singularityhub.com)

kkleiner writes: "Broad Group, a Chinese construction company in Hunan Province has built a 30 stories tall and 183,000-square feet hotel in just 360 hours, or 15 days! But Broad Group didn’t sacrifice quality for speed. Their hotel is sturdy, earthquake-safe up to magnitude 9. It’s sustainable architecture design has 4-paned insulated windows and a smart heat conservation system. The company boasts an energy efficiency five times that of conventional hotels. Air filters also make the hotel’s air 20 times the purity of conventional hotels."
Your Rights Online

Submission + - The end of dutch uncensored internet marks a black (rechtspraak.nl) 1

xonen writes: Two dutch internet providers are summoned by the court to block DNS entries and IP addresses of the pirate bay.
This list is allowed to be updated by a private organization, 'BREIN', which represent the media industries.
Despite several errors, false assumptions and other inconsistensies in the ruling, those 2 ISP's are ordered to disallow access within 2 weeks. Other ISP's are expected to follow soon (or not, depending whom you ask). It is likely that the two ISP's involved will seek a higher court ruling.

The part of the ruling that causes most pain, is not as much as that a site gets blocked — which is bad enough by itself — but that a private organisation is granted full control on the list of dns entries and IP's that is to be blocked — opening the door to arbitrary censorship.

Robotics

Submission + - Pocket sized drones wins £20 mil contract fr (suasnews.com)

garymortimer writes: "Developments in micro electronics, especially in mobile phone and battery technologies, have made it feasible to develop advanced flying platforms that weigh just a few grams. Teaming up specialists in video and signal processing, hardware design and operational know how created the necessary foundation for the company. During 2009 the company more than doubled in size creating the largest UAS Company in Norway.

The PD-100 Black Hornet is the first airborne Personal Reconnaissance System to be developed. It will provide soldiers with their own immediate Intelligence,Surveillance and Reconnaissance capability for operations in confined areas and outdoors."

Submission + - Could crowd-sourced democracy be made to work? (google.com) 1

maccallr writes: The Occupy Movement is getting everyone talking about how to fix the world's economic (and social, environmental...) problems. It is even trialling new forms of "open" democracy. Trouble is, it's easy to criticise the physical occupiers for being unrepresentative of the general population — and much of their debating time is spent on practical rather than policy issues. Well-meaning but naive occupiers could be susceptible to exploitation by the political establishment and vested interests. In the UK, virtual occupiers are using Google Moderator to propose and debate policy in the comfort of their homes (where, presumably, it is easier to find out stuff you didn't know). Could something like this be done on a massive scale (national or global) to reach consensus on what needs to be done? How do you maximise participation by "normal folk" on complex issues? What level of participation could be considered quorate? How do you deal with block votes? What can we learn from e-petitions and Iceland's crowd-sourced constitution? Is the "Occupy" branding appropriate? What other pitfalls are there? Or are existing models of democracy and dictatorship fit for purpose?
Google

Submission + - Google Maps, Disease Risk, and Migration (stanford.edu)

ecorona writes: This google maps mashup http://geneworld.stanford.edu/hgdp was published in Science this week. Paywall warning: http://www.sciencemag.org/content/334/6056/583.full. It shows genetic risk for multiple diseases distributed across the globe. It's easy to follow the migration path and see which diseases increase/decrease in risk along human migration paths. Click on the populations to see the relative risk of the selected disease for each population. You can pick your a disease and see which populations are more susceptible. The article is behind a paywall, but the website is free to use.
Ubuntu

Submission + - Ubuntu 12.04 Will Be Pixel-Perfect: Mark Shuttlewo (muktware.com) 1

sfcrazy writes: It seems Ubuntu will be freezing attempts to play with the UI anymore and would instead focus on 'stabling' and polishing the current features in order to qualify 12.04 as an LTS release. Since LTS is deployed by enterprises, which is Canonical's source of revenue, stability is of utmost importance. Seems like 12.04 is going to be a rock-solid release, just like its mom Debian!
Security

Submission + - Which Mobile OS Is Most Hit By Malware? (net-security.org)

dinscott writes: As most mobile phone users still don't have a mobile AV solution installed on their devices, it can be rather hard to gauge just how many of them have been hit by mobile malware.

But, mobile phones often get synched with the users' computers. Also, users often use their computers to search for mobile apps on third-party application markets and file-sharing sites, so mobile malware occasionally does end up on their desktop/laptop computers, and gets detected by AV software.

And this is precisely how Microsoft researchers manage to get an idea of just what kind of malware attacks the various mobile operating systems.

News

Submission + - Get Ready To Quantum Levitate (motherboard.tv)

CoveredTrax writes: "Few motifs of science fiction cinema have been more appealing to us than the subtle defiance of gravity offered by futuristic hovercraft. So every once in a while we check in to see how humanity is progressing on that front, and whether the promise of hover boards will be delivered by 2015 as evidenced in Back to the Future Part 2. We’re not quite there yet, but we’re definitely getting off the ground, so to speak. Get ready to hover your brain around the art of quantum levitation."
Security

Submission + - Anonymous Plans To Occupy Wall St., Attack Banks (itworld.com)

jfruhlinger writes: "For some time there's been plans for various groups affiliated with Anonymous to occupy Wall Street with 20,000 protestors, starting this weekend, to protest the intersection of money and politics. Now there's rumblings that Anonymous is improving its attack tools in anticipation of accompanying attacks on the Websites of major financial institutions."
Space

Submission + - First Exoplanet Discovered Orbiting Two Stars (discovery.com)

astroengine writes: "For the first time, astronomers have discovered an exoplanet orbiting binary stars. Kepler-16b, a Saturn-sized world approximately 200 light-years away, orbits Kepler-16, two stars locked in a mutual dance. Although other exoplanets are known to exist in binary systems, they have only been known to be orbiting one star of the binary pair; Kepler-16b orbits both.

"It shows the gears of celestial mechanics turning and interlocking so vividly, you almost want to reach out and touch it," exoplanet scientist Marc Kuchner, with NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., told Discovery News. "Kepler himself would have been dizzy with excitement."

No doubt Kepler-16b will excite memories of Tatooine, Luke Skywalker's homeworld, but the double sunset is where the similarities end. Kepler-16b would be anything but a desert world; it is the approximate size of Saturn, it is extremely cold, and is the average density of water."

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