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Comment Re:Hands on Wheel? (Score 1) 148

Actually they don't. Severe shoulder, arm, and back pain is a big deal for truckers. I'm a massage therapist. I've worked on guys who were in "level 10" pain. Real agony.

I've seen issues with the muscles: Teres major, Teres Minor, Latissimus Dorsi, Deltoids, Trapezius, Scalenes, Extensors and Flexors of the forearm, Triceps. (not the bicep very often tho), corocobrachialis. Oh and infra and super spinatus and levitor scapula.

http://dotphysicalutah.com/faq...

Plus the muscles: gluteus max and min (but not med), multifidus, erector spinae/spinalis, quadratus lumborum and psoas major.

http://www.crengland.com/truck...
http://realtruckdriver.com/3-c...

The best position would be in a comfortable char with your arms resting but not crossed watching the road attentively with little "attention" quizzes where you had to tap a button when a light came on. And with the machine observing you were in a capable state-- not falling asleep or looking away from the front for over 10 seconds at a time.

Comment Re:Distracted (Score 1) 148

I don't think there was any fire. He was beheaded I think. Pictures of the Tesla make it clear it went under the trailer and the top of the car was ripped off clean at the body of the car.

The car then continued driving and swerved right? to the side of the road and stopped against a tree (not sure if it was braking or if it hit the tree or both).

Comment It's universal (Score 1) 192

It's time to face up to it, most people don't see copyright infringement as being all that serious. That includes the big copyright advocates that get caught with infringing material on their websites or who never quite get around to paying the artists their royalties, or who claim copyright on things that expired years ago. Right down to agencies who collect "for" artists who never agreed to their representation and who never see a check for the amount collected.

Meanwhile, it can't be THAT big of a problem. The various media companies make more money every year.

Comment Re:Hands on Wheel? (Score 1) 148

Rather than "hands on wheel", it should be "eyes looking towards road ahead". My tablet can tell if I'm looking at it. The car should be able to see the driver is in the seat, looking forward, with their eyes open.

Reasonable gaps of a couple seconds should be allowed since humans are supposed to look around but that's just a programming detail.

So say the car realizes the driver hasn't been looking forward for a certain number of seconds, it warns the driver, starts slowing down and attempts to hand control over to the driver.

Really dark sunglasses would be an issue. And sunlight was an issue in the florida crash.

Still, holding your arms up for hours is a recipe for pain.

Submission + - Zuckerberg sues hundreds of Hawaiians to force property sales to him. (msn.com)

mmell writes: Apparently, owning 700 acres of land in Hawaii isn't enough — Mark Zuckerberg, founder of Facebook, has filed suit to force owners of several small parcels of land to sell to the highest bidder. The reason? These property owners are completely surrounded by Zuckerberg's land holdings and therefore have lawful easement to cross his property in order to get to theirs.

Many of these land owners have held their land for generations, but seemingly Mr. Zuckerberg can not tolerate their presence so close to his private little slice of paradise. Landowners such as these came to own their land when their ancestors were "given" the land as Hawaiian natives.

If successful in his "quiet title" court action, Mr. Zuckerberg will finally have his slice of Hawaii's beaches and tropical lands without having to deal with the pesky presence of neighbors who were on his land before he owned it. Who knew that Hawaiians were just another kind of Native Americans?

Submission + - Galileo satellites experiencing multiple clock failures (bbc.com)

elgatozorbas writes: According to a BBC article, the onboard atomic clocks that drive the satellite-navigation signals on Europe's Galileo network have been failing at an alarming rate.

Across the 18 satellites now in orbit, nine clocks have stopped operating. Three are traditional rubidium devices; six are the more precise hydrogen maser instruments that were designed to give Galileo superior performance to the American GPS network.

Comment Re:They are suppressing partial solutions (Score 1) 127

American Medicine enjoys the punitive Puritan approach. That's why we get so much bogus dietary advice that leads to eating unsatisfying food that tastes like sweetened cardboard in spite of research suggesting that your Grandma's (or Great Grandma's by now) dietary advice works much better and tastes orders of magnitude better.

Comment Re:HBO needs to get its head back in the game (Score 1) 141

The HBO subscription is only worth it if you have a peer group that also has an HBO subscription and so it's important to watch things at the same time as them. I stopped buying DVDs about 10 years ago when renting became a lot cheaper than buying, but I've recently started again with boxed sets. Even if I only watch each episode once, it's cheaper than any of the streaming options, plus they're practically DRM free (as in, the DRM is so broken that it may as well not exist) and I can copy them to a mobile device for watching on long trips. Oh, and I get to wait until there are multiple years of something before I watch it.

I do wonder a bit what would happen to the economics of TV series production if most people did this. You'd expect a TV show to make a loss for the first few years, but then be profitable over a longer time, which is a very different model from the current mode of any profits after the first year are a nice bonus, but not factored into the accounting calculations.

Comment Re:Saving the world with a Tax. (Score 4, Insightful) 249

The idea of a tax isn't as silly as you make it sound. The problem with most forms of pollution (from a purely economic standpoint) is that one person or company gains the benefits from polluting, but everyone pays the costs. This is known as an externality. Taxing pollution fixes this and means that the polluting technology becomes more expensive to operate and makes the barrier to entry for non-polluting technologies higher. If something is producing a lot of carbon dioxide but costs $5/widget, and you add a tax that amounts to $2.50/widget, then a replacement technology that doesn't emit any CO_2 but costs $7/widget is now cheaper to use. This means that you can bring it to market before you've got the economies of scale to push the price down below $5/widget.

Comment Re:solar/wind talk is spin - France vs China (Score 1) 249

Size doesn't really matter, because most renewable schemes scale with area. Population density does. France has 116/km^2, China has 145/km^2, so almost a 25% higher overall population density. That translates to a little bit less space for wind, solar, hydro and so on per capita, but not by enough to make it infeasible. Add in nuclear power, and the scaling is quite easy - building a nuclear power plant is hard, but doubling the generating capacity doesn't come close to doubling the land area, as long as you have a supply of uranium (China has uranium mines, France doesn't).

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