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Comment Zuckerberg, really? (Score 4, Interesting) 107

I don't despise Mark Zuckerberg like many do, but I hardly think he qualifies as a tech leader. Facebook succeeded through luck, timing, hard work and good engineering. That's all laudable, but there wasn't much leadership or vision involved. Bezos' initial idea, an online bookstore, was hardly visionary or leading but subsequent decisions, especially the decision to standardize internal system interfaces that led to the idea, and ability, to create AWS absolutely was visionary. Google should have done that, but didn't have the vision. There's no debating the vision of Elon "Mars or bust in my solar-powered electric car" Musk. Musk has so much vision we'd call him a crackpot, except that he has a tendency to succeed. Steve Jobs was clearly a leader and a visionary with a focus on making technology simple and beautiful.

And there are other leaders around who I'd say are much worthier than Zuckerberg. Larry Page, for example, whose goal for his new startup was to "Organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful", an insanely ambitious mission which arguably is no longer ambitious enough to describe what Alphabet/Google is doing. Mark Shuttleworth, not so much for Thawte as for Canonical, where his vision hasn't really succeeded in displacing Windows but has gone much further than most of us considered possible. Though a bunch of CEOs probably wouldn't pick him, I'd put Richard Stallman high on the list, too. His vision of the importance of software freedom has been incredibly influential.

I could go on, but the point is... Zuckerberg? Really? For what? I suppose it was visionary to believe that you could build a billion-user interactive system with PHP.

Comment Re:Dumbass (Score 1) 312

If Wheat was the problem, the US would be dropping food bags on the populace instead of TONS OF WEAPONS. GUNS DO NOT GROW OR WATER CROPS YOU FUCKING MORON!

Let me get this straight. Your argument is that the crisis must not be driven by a non-political cause because if it were the US would have solved it? Or, to put it another way, your're arguing that the US government is so perfectly effective at always addressing the root causes of problems in a timely manner, that the government's failure to address this one means it's not the root cause?

Dude, you must know a different US government than I do. The one I know occasionally does the right thing at the right time, but it's mostly by accident.

Comment Re:Bad Idea, but that's what Germany is up to now. (Score 1) 61

No, that's 2D, not 3D. It knows the direction your eyes are facing, but not how far away they are, which is needed to project an overlay correctly.
Google glasses can do it because you're always the same distance from the screen, but when driving you aren't, unless someone straps your head to the headrest.
So you need 3D head monitoring, not just 2D. And that's not here yet.

Comment Re:No possible problem with this at all. (Score 1) 61

Perform this thought experiment. You are in a large lecture hall. There is a computer projector displaying a circle on the screen at the front of the room. The projector electronics have taken the angles into account and distorted the incoming video signal so that the displayed image is a circle on the screen. Now move about the room so your perspective of the screen changes. The image on your retina will change based on your angle to the screen, but your brain will still see a circle.

Counter-example: Walk along a school road, and look for the SCHOOL marking in the street. From the side, it's so distorted that it's very hard to make out what it says.

Comment Re:Just what people need, more distractions (Score 1) 61

I'm piloting over a tonne of metal moving at speeds capable of inflicting instantaneous death upon anything in my way; don't fucking distract me by putting on a pretty light show on the road ahead!

Indeed. And this includes strobo lights on bicycles, which are banned in some more civilized countries precisely because they cause accidents for others than the selfish bastard using them for their own protection, fuck everybody else.

Cooperate, and don't distract people who try to control heavy objects at high speed.

Comment Re:Bad Idea, but that's what Germany is up to now. (Score 1) 61

The correct way to do this is with a heads-up display.

That works great if it's calibrated to your head position, and you don't move your head a lot. Not so much for Wayne and Garth.
Head tracking and a fast computer might help, once it not only tracks a 2D head position, but also distance from the windshield.

Comment Re:No possible problem with this at all. (Score 1) 61

The problem is perspective. The road is flat, so what's projected on it will not appear as the same shape for someone looking on it from elsewhere.

Also, roads are seldom ballroom floor flat. Which paint can overcome, but a very shallow angle light can't. Even a very small hump in front of the target, small enough to not even notice when driving over it, can block the light.

Comment Military Committee wants more money (Score 1) 312

It's entirely unsurprising that a military committee would recommend that a good response to ANYTHING is increasing military spending. When the military advises that defense interests are better served by redirecting their own funding to offsetting climate change that's the point you know they mean it. Otherwise you've got guys with little to no climate background declaring climate change as a good reason to give them more money, which isn't entirely convincing.

Comment Not skeptical enough (Score 1) 312

The amount of money in AGW is a fraction of the amount of money oil companies pump out of the ground every week.

You are missing just how much money there is to be controlled through carbon taxes and carbon markets. Furthermore, to have a military adviser declaring that topic X is an important reason to increase military funding hardly seems surprising. Call me when the military volunteers their budgets be cut to help offset climate change because it's more effective.

Comment Re:Thoughtcrime (Score 1) 404

There is no evidence that viewing child porn causes the consumer to commit more child abuse, and some evidence that it is preventative.

I'll invite you to name your sources. In 2006 a documentary aired on the Dutch national television that made the case that viewers of childporn have a tendency to view worse and worse forms of it as well as try to create their own as well

I don't know one way or the other about the question of how viewing child porn affects pedophiles, but a documentary is not evidence. A documentary may be based on evidence, but the documentary itself is not, and I see nothing in the description that makes me think there was some solid data underlying the documentary's claims.

Comment Re:That can't be right (Score 1) 504

Only 92 million Americans are out of work. A number that haven't changed in four or five years.

Currently as of November 2016, 59.7 of the adult population is employed. That means that out of the 245.3 million adult Americans (also per November 2016), 98 million are unemployed.
But that figure isn't too useful alone. It doesn't reflect either those who live on their fortunes (including pensioners), nor does it account for those who are underemployed.

And as for the number not changing, look at the statistics. There's a small but significant and near linear climb in employment rates for the last five years. It's not big enough to make up for the toll the 2009-10 recession took, but it's certainly pointing upwards.

United States

US Economy Added 178,000 Jobs in November; Unemployment Rate Drops To 4.6 Percent (washingtonpost.com) 504

The U.S. economy added 178,000 jobs in November, while the unemployment rate fell to 4.6 percent from 4.9 percent the previous month, according to new government data released (Editor's note: the link could be paywalled; alternate source) Friday morning. From a report on the Washington Post: Economists surveyed by Bloomberg News had expected U.S. employers to create 180,000 new jobs last month -- roughly in line with the average number added in the first 11 months of the year. The first release after a contentious election in which the candidates disputed the health and direction of the economy, the data showed a job market that is continuing to steadily strengthen from the recession. The unemployment rate fell to levels not seen since August 2007, before a bubble in the U.S. housing market began to burst. The fall was driven partly by the creation of new jobs, and partly by people retiring and otherwise leaving the labor force. The labor force participation rate ticked down to 62.7 percent. Average hourly earnings declined by 3 cents to $25.89. The decrease pared back large gains seen in October, but over the year average hourly earnings are still up 2.5 percent, the Bureau of Labor Statistics said.

Comment Re:Hey look the flow rate is a little high. (Score 1) 179

But that's the problem - you can decide who you sync with, but you cannot decide who others sync with.
A time discrepancy is a problem in either case.

The most obvious solution is that the bourses should provide time synchronization, and that everyone else sync to their time, right or wrong.

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