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Comment Re:Just needs a little nudge. (Score 1) 167

It's an interesting idea, but it would be costly. I suspect at the end of the day it would probably be cheaper to build a Lunar satellite that retrofit ISS. Basically you would need to add a lot more shielding, and I have my suspicions that would be difficult to accomplish.

Honestly, while it doubtless costs and will continue to cost a lot to maintain, maintaining it is still cheaper than (eventually) building a new orbiter. Obviously there are finite limits to how long anything habitable can remain in space without significant overhaul, but as the article says, 2024 is a policy limit, not an engineering one.

As to a lunar orbiter, I think it's a damned fine idea. Figure out how to build it in modules, and have robots or remote control piece it together. If you could get that kind of technology down pat, you could basically build orbiters for Mars or beyond, send them ahead of any manned mission, and thus you could significantly decrease the amount of supplies needed for the actual manned mission itself.

Comment Re:Good (Score 1) 249

I actually favor the British model of very short "series", rather than 22-24 episodes per season. Let's be honest, when you have to write that many 48 minute episodes you're going to run dry in the idea department very quickly. The genius of something like Fawlty Towers is that you only have to write six scripts for a series, meaning you're not stretching for ideas. Imagine having to write 20-odd Fawlty Towers scripts, and assuming it's a hit and is renewed, that you have to do that for possibly five or six or more seasons.

Even the best shows will tend to run out of steam before they reach 100 hundred episodes. There's just no real way to keep any story going that long. You'll lose writers, even show-runners, and even where you can keep stable production and writing teams, and assuming you don't lose actors (or, as with The Walking Dead, you just wantonly kill them off in place of actually having to write anything good, preferring shock to substance), it gets damned hard.

I think Breaking Bad had it just about right, with an average of 13 episodes per season (though the last one had sixteen as I recall), and still managed to keep quality pretty high. If they had had to push that up over 20, they would have written budget and writing limits, much as happened with The Walking Dead. I see no reason however why you can't tell a story in a more British-style short series. Broadchurch did it in 8 episodes per series. You get to have a story arc without the filler episodes, which I felt often detracted from series like the X Files and Deep Space Nine.

Comment Good (Score 4, Interesting) 249

The film and TV industry have been in a stasis for decades. TV, in particular, hasn't really changed significantly since the early 1960s, and Hollywood has basically functioned the same way since the collapse of the Studio System. It's time for a big shake up and if companies like Netflix and Amazon can deliver that shakeup, then so be it.

Comment Re: Uh, why? (Score 1) 201

I can't say I ever saw a random reboot during the years I ran OS/2. There were a few BSODs, but heck, those can still happen even now on Windows. Don't recall any memory issues either. The worst part was WPS lockups because it had a single message queue, and an errant application could bring it to a screaming halt. It didn't happen that often, but was the worst thing I experienced in OS/2

Comment Re:Alternative media. (Score 0) 288

So when he was fabricating Twitter posts from Leslie Jones and encouraging his legions of adolescent cranks to attack her, that wasn't overtly racist? And for what, because he didn't like the Ghostbusters reboot (I didn't like it much either, but that certainly wasn't the actors' faults, that was the horrible screenplay).

Comment Re:But Dissent is Now HATE (Score 1) 288

I'm never sure whether the advocates of Neo-Nazis getting money from Youtube are just very anal individuals who have bought into the notion that First Amendment protections ought to apply to communications on private platforms, or are Neo-Nazis themselves. I think for the most part we're dealing with Aspies and similar types who have incredibly rigid world views and are cognitively incapable of seeing that a company like Google ultimately has to serve its customers (the advertisers) in the way that they want, or at least accommodate their concerns, although I'm sure the Neo-Nazis aren't happy either.

Comment Re:Why Fox? (Score 0) 522

Because some people treat ideology like their religion. It's really that simple. They don't care what the rest of the world does. They'll grab the skeletal remains of Jefferson and Adams and make the jaws move as they declare. "government shouldn't be in health care."

Meanwhile, back in the real world the US has some of the worst health care outcomes of any developed nations, despite having one of the most expensive health care systems.

Comment Re: Oh well (Score 1) 211

There are always winners and losers. What amuses me is how you pretend you like birds, when what you really like is not having to do fuck all, and passing the buck to the next generation. And how many species do you imagine will get driven to extinction by spiraling climate change over the next century.

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