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Comment Re:Poor business (Score 1) 377

Staring at the score a single reviewer gives is, IMHO, stupid, but taking a look at what thousands of people think gives a much better image of what it's actually like. On Rotten Tomatoes, IMDB and the likes I always look at the user-score, not the critic-score, and pretty often the user-score more-or-less matches with my opinion.

Submission + - SPAM: Quicken Bill Pay is No Longer Safe to Use 1

Bruce Perens writes: I don't usually make security calls, but when a company makes egregious and really clueless security mistakes, it's often the case that the only way to attract their attention and get the issue fixed is to publicize it. This one is with Quicken Bill Pay, a product of Metavante (not Intuit). It's from personal observation rather than an expert witness case, and the company has been unresponsive through their customer support channel.
Link to Original Source

Comment Abandoning Time-Worn Processes Leads to Atrophy (Score 5, Insightful) 158

Scientists determined that those people who made use of machine washing rather than hand washing had diminished hand strength and neurological motor communication necessary for fine motor control. Seamstresses who bought thread rather than using the spinning jenny were similarly impaired. But worst off were teamsters who used the internal combustion trucks rather than teams of horses and used forklifts and other mechanical devices rather than loading their vehicles by hand. Their overall body strength was much reduced.

Comment Re:Speak password out loud? (Score 2) 54

They meant "mouthing the password," it's just poorly worded. There's e.g. the excerpt of "Third, lip passwords don't rely on speech recognition, meaning they can be used in noisy environments." in the article, which obviously wouldn't work if you had to actually say the password out loud -- the background noise would just drown you out. The system just relies on lip shape and mouth movement, not actually hearing anything.

Comment Re:Geometry is hard, as is geography (Score 1) 319

Habit.

Marine navigation was probably the first and most important use case for maps that were exact in one aspect. (for land navigation, rough sketches were as usefull as long as they contained landmarks)

And when someone wanted an actual map for the first time, they went for the most important and best known map.

Comment No shit (Score 1) 319

And I dunno about schools these days, or everywhere for that matter, but way back when I was in high school the books usually used something that was quasi-cylindrical like a Robinson or some such. Tended to give you a good picture of whatever they centered it on (which would usually be whatever was being talked about) and squished things near the edges.

I don't recall ever seeing a Mercator projection. Maybe the local maps were, like when it was showing a single country, but of course it doesn't matter a lot at that point as the distortion in a small area isn't that large whatever kind of projection you use.

Comment What's the point? (Score 4, Informative) 55

The official Orange Pi - images are total fucking crapshoot, being so bad they make even your mum's cameltoe look appealing in comparison! It's not the availability of apps that is the problem, it's the support for the boards and all of their features, including Mali-drivers, or the closed, undocumented WiFi-chips, and so on that is the problem! Xunlong ain't doing shit to help get drivers mainlined in the kernel, they just produce a shitty image that barely boots and then hope the community will do all the hard work for them.

So, what's the point with these "snaps?" How do they make the situation any better? Oh, they don't? Weeellll...

Comment That's how these things always go (Score 4, Insightful) 125

Whenever there's a "language popularity" thing online they always do their research by looking at what people are doing online. Either what they are talking about, what they are sharing, etc. Somehow none of them ever consider how horribly skewed this is.

The simplest counterexample to something like this is embedded software. It is unarguable that there's a lot of development of that going on. Everything today gets controlled with a micro-controller or small CPU. Actual custom designed ASICs/circuits are reserved for only a few applications, most things get a more general purpose device and do it in code. Your car, your cable modem, your microwave, your TV, etc all of them run code.

Well guess what? That embedded code isn't done in Javascript or Ruby or any of these other trendy languages. Often as not it is done in C/C++ (and sometimes partially or all assembly). It just isn't the sort of things that gets posted about online. First the code is almost always proprietary, so the project itself isn't going to get posted as it is property of the company that paid to have it written and second it is professionals working in teams doing it, not people who are getting started out or playing around. They are likely to get help internally, not talk about it on the Internet.

So if you want to look at Github to see what is popular on Github, that's cool, but when people try to generalize that to development overall, it is false. To get a feeling for what is really popular in software development you'd have to poll programmers working at a variety of big companies since that's where a lot of the code is being generated.

Comment Re:Cost (Score 2) 266

For two feet, fly business class. But who needs this? They only can sell that at all because economy became so crappy.

Just raise the standard again. By those two inces in width, by those two inches in legroom. Give everyone a decent sandwich.

I'm NOT going to pay extra if an airline wants to divide pasengers further into the poor cattle and the "luxury" of "economy plus" where in the end they charge you $50 for that sandwich and a bag with a towel and a sleeping mask, but I'll pick an airline that offers better basic service if the difference is no more than say, $100.

Comment If the goal is reducing federal spending (Score 1) 648

Then restoration is not the way to go. You can't on the one hand say "We have to cut spending!" and then on the other say "We have to give the military back what we cut!" If you want budget cuts to try and balance the budget ok, but then the military has to be part of it. It is bigger than any other agency, by a large margin. You could eliminate (not cut, completely eliminate) education, transportation, agriculture, HHS, and the DoE and not even come close to the whole military budget.

Another way of looking at the military cuts is restoring it to 1990s levels, percentage wise. In the mid 90s defense spending was about $270 billion which was about 16% of the budget. In 2015 defense spending was about $640 billion (estimates are harder here since congress doesn't include Iraq and Afghanistan costs directly in the budget) which is about 16% of the budget.

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