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Comment Re:motivation (Score 1) 192

Another manager threatened to beat an underperforming employee's head in with a baseball bat.

Now, that's what must be a highly motivating work environment :/

One must wonder how their hiring process works, i.e. letting such characters through the gates, since recent reports don't paint a pretty picture.

Negan will hire anyone, but loves to bash in heads with a baseball bat. One could certainly call "perform well so you do not die" to be a highly-motivated work environment.

Comment Re:Talk about a subset of a subset (Score 1) 61

If VR takes off you'll have plenty of other uses besides gaming. Scientific visualizations, vertical applications and whatnot. You'll want to support Linux as an OS just like NVIDIA supports it for GPGPU, workstations and embedded applications. That it gives Linux desktops 3D gaming ability is just a small bonus.

Comment Re:Artificial language limits (Score 1) 374

Any language that could replace C and assembler would need to be statically compiled. So for Java, C#, Python and so on you'd have to define a subset that does not require a runtime parser or standard library. And you'd need extensions (or a static module system) that allows you to add assembler for direct hardware access. And a new compiler that can generate static code instead of the intermediate VM they target now. Not impossible by any means and probably a fairly interesting exercise too, but the languages would end up rather different and more restricted than the full versions people are used to.

Rather, I expect and hope that something like Rust will eventually supplant these languages in this space. Rust gives you the best of both worlds, with a statically compiled binaries and good memory safety at compile time, rather than runtime. You pay for it by having to be much more explicit about ownership than in these languages though. I've followed that project for a good while and it's clear that targeting small embedded systems is a struggle even for such a language; Java and friends would be much more difficult still.

Comment Re:Artificial language limits (Score 1) 374

FORTH is the rare language that tends to be even more memory efficient than C. The runtime interpreter is truly minimal (really just following a bunch of jump tables); you can have a small environment and application code in less than 8K.

On the other hand - and I say this as someone who likes FORTH a lot - you'd be hard pressed to find people claiming that FORTH is any higher-level (or easier to develop in) than C or assembler.

On the third hand - and off-topic here - it's quite a fun little language to use. Just like you can say that Scheme is programming directly in an AST, using FORTH is writing code directly for a stack machine. It's probably good for you to have a bit of experience even if you never do anything "real" with it.

Comment Re:They said the same about mobile (Score 3, Informative) 374

The high-level VMs and the drivers to drive the specific hardware isn't developed by magical Low-Level Elves in Happy Rainbow Fairly Land. Every IoT device is going to have their oen special hardware stuff, and somebody needs to write the low-level code to interface with it. That is done in a combination of C and assembler.

Also, at volume the price difference between a MCU that can run a VM and one that can not will be on the order of tens of cents (either currency). If you plan to make on the order of a million devices, then 20 cents per unit will more than pay for a programmer that knows to use the small MCU over a Java hack that does not.

Comment Re: This is not surprising (Score 1) 245

And then, there's Benghazi. Clear case of treason, and no Democrat is interested.

Clinton clearly dropped the ball with Benghazi. Her negligence had fatal consequences, and her apology did not sound sincere. However, I would not call what she did "treason:"

Treason against the United States, shall consist only in levying War against them, or in adhering to their Enemies, giving them Aid and Comfort. No Person shall be convicted of Treason unless on the Testimony of two Witnesses to the same overt Act, or on Confession in open Court.

Source: The Constitution of the United States: Article III, Section 3.

She was negligent and failed either to provide additional support for the consulate or authorize their withdrawal to a safer location. She did not levy war against the United States, nor did she adhere to or provide aid and comfort to an enemy of the United States. She was a spineless coward who clearly did not respect her subordinates or value their lives: but she did not commit the crime of treason. I think in general some people throw that word around a little too loosely without understanding what it means.

Comment Re:Well, no shit! (Score 1) 328

I still even have a 10.6 workstation because the scanner software for my film scanner I have is PowerPC.

Vuescan works OK and is available for OSX, Windows and Linux. It supports a huge range of scanners old and new. I've been using it for many years and I can say it gives quality results, while the UI is at least no worse than other scanner software (not a high bar to clear, of course). And since it's cross-platform it's one less thing to lock you in to any specific system.

Comment Re: Why do people keep using Windows? (Score 2) 163

And then there's the fragmentation issue. Should they use Redhat or Suse or Yellowdog (wait what?) or Ubuntu or Kubuntu? What's the difference? Explained in phrasing that makes sense to somebody with a degree in Political Science?

That part should be easy to explain to those types. "Those are several vendors competing for the same market, so if things go wrong you can switch between them without having to completely retrain your tech people. If you start having problems with Windows too bad - Microsoft is the only provider".

Comment Re:I don't even like Uber but (Score 1) 726

On the contrary, allowing people to outcompete each others on who works for less is what causes poor people to run out of options. If you work the whole day for slightly less than a subsistence salary, there's no room for doing something that will improve your life.

Slavery is doesn't appear because "by definition" someone is forced to do something against their will, it happens because some removes all other options from you, so that the other possible voluntary alternative is death.

Comment Re:I don't even like Uber but (Score 1) 726

Did you really just compare forced labor with the threat of harm and/or death to voluntary employment?

There's a difference in degree only, not semantics. When people live in a region so poor and uneducated that all jobs and communication with the external world are provided by a single landowner, there isn't much difference between being a free peasant or a slave. This advice coming from someone living in a country which was governed by that model for several centuries.

Comment Re:Maybe voice activation is overrated? (Score 2) 210

BTW, the part about knowing who's going to use the door and who isn't is probably doable with cameras and enough processing power.

It is possible, and it has been built. A couple of colleagues in Sweden did just that for one manufacturer, more than fifteen years ago. The idea was to reduce the amount of heat lost from unnecessary door openings in winter, and to a lesser extent from cooling losses in summer.

It would recognize who was aiming for the door versus those that just walked past. It wasn't fooled by dogs or kids (would open for kids, but not dogs) or things like suitcases or prams. During development they built a version that would only open if you did the Vulcan hand sign thing.

But it was too expensive. Automatic doors are not a high-margin business - there's many competitors - and the actual savings did not make up for the higher price. The actual energy losses are pretty minimal for most shops, and door openings are usually not in error. Those that have a real problem with it tend to use revolving or double doors already.

Also, it didn't help that the shops might have needed permission to mount what is effectively a camera pointing out on the street.

Today the hardware would be cheaper, and cameras are far more acceptable. But from what I heard customer interest would still be small.

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