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Comment Re:Weird definition (Score 1) 224

So 54 people in the United States had the measles last year, but we're measles free because those people picked it up elsewhere?

It's worse than that. Measles is still being transmitted in the US. It is just not "endemic". The source of the outbreak is someone who contracted the virus outside the country who then goes on to spread it to those who stayed home.

Comment Re:Courage, it didn't come, doesn't matter (Score 4, Insightful) 551

Two things:

The expensive ass proprietary dongles are free and included with the phone.

The 1/8" stereo plug is over 50 fucking year old. I'm not sure this is the answer, but it's shitty technology

And the wheel is over 5000 years old. Do you have a better idea?

Just because a technology is old, doesn't mean it not still the right solution.

Comment Re: Food supply for bats (Score 1) 470

Bats also eat thousands and thousands of tons of insects that otherwise would wipe out our crops. They are extremely useful creatures. I think we can put up with the relatively insignificant annoyance of a few of them having rabies, especially in view of the fact that we have had a rabies vaccine since 1885.

We do not have an effective rabies vaccine for humans. For dogs and cats? Yes. For humans, the vaccine only buys you a week or two to reach a medical facility that can pump you up with gamma globulin. Skip that last step and nearly any human infected with rabies will die. Since there is no hope at all once symptoms appear, the only utility of the rabies vaccine is people in remote areas who may be too far to reach medical help otherwise. To add insult, the vaccine is expensive. Any one point in in time (the price fluctuates a lot), it can be $1000.

Comment Re:How does this compare to 3d-xpoint stuff? (Score 1) 145

How does this compare to 3d-xpoint stuff?

You can actually buy the NAND SSD's. Who knows when 3D-Xpoint will actually ship?

When it becomes available, 3DXpoint is expected to be faster than NAND Flash but also more expensive. To make use of that speed it needs a lower latency interface than PCIe. Unfortunately, it is not quite fast enough to comfortably mix with DRAM on the DDR bus. It remains to be seen how it will actually be connected.

Comment Forcing a special channel (Score 1) 290

If it works for the film maker it is only because few people will actually use this method. It is painful enough that only subordinates and those who absolutely must communicate with the film maker will hassle with listening to or sending voice memos. She is not overwhelmed because less is getting communicated.

I've had co-workers do that: require that communication with them only take place through some obscure channel that only they like to use. It cuts down the cruft all right. If you make it painful enough to communicate with you, people will not communicate when it is not important. Unfortunately, it also means you often don't get informed when it *is* important.

Comment Re: WTF PA? (Score 1) 271

There's that, and I am curious how they're collecting sales taxes from Netflix given that Netflix likely doesn't have a presence there.

Most likely they are just making it the resident's responsibility to report that on their yearly taxes and pay it appropriately. Lots of states (like mine) are doing that with online shopping now too.

Yes, they do. California has had this since at least the 1990's. However, the only times I have heard of anyone actually complying is for business purchases. The Netflix tax would be easier to track since it is a fixed monthly charge that doesn't require collecting random receipts for a year. Still, I think it would be difficult to enforce and the default for most consumers would be to ignore the tax just like they do with California's use tax.

Comment Re:Can't password expiration be based on complexit (Score 1) 211

Every company I've worked for forced us to change passwords regardless of complexity. So I, and probably everyone else, used a simple phrase with a number to increment. I would have liked it if I picked a long, complex, hard to crack password that I'd be rewarded with a longer period before requiring to change my password. Would this make sense in practice?

Tricky. Since passwords are stored as one-way hashes, complexity can only be evaluated when the password is changed. Thus, a indicator of the complexity would have to be stored. If the password store were compromised, this data could be used to selectively attack the weakest passwords.

Comment Re:No (Score 1) 151

I have a 10 year old Dell Inspiron 1501 laptop with a "Ready for Vista" sticker on it running Windows 10 that says otherwise.

Indeed. It says that you did not read or did not understand the summary. This article is about mobile devices (phones and tablets) not desktop computers. Hence, the Android example and calling them "devices" instead of "computers".

Running modern OS's on old desktop hardware is not all that difficult as long as the components are popular and well supported (more obscure components may not have drivers available for modern OS's).

However, the same can not be said for mobile devices. Even a three year old phone may be officially unsupported and by five years it is pretty much guaranteed. By "unsupported", I mean that neither the preview or the current release will run. You can sometimes find hacked up versions that run on older hardware at the expense of stability, performance, and functionality. This is largely due to lack of driver support in the newer kernels for the components baked into the older devices. There is no option to chose your components wisely.

Comment Re:No (Score 1) 151

No. This is what virtual machines are for. Or an older box you might have laying around.

Unfortunately, the older boxes don't generally run the preview or even the current stable. Short of physical damage that is generally why they are not primary devices any more.

Of course, there are people who buy a new phone every six months. I think they are crazy but they might be the kind of crazy who install preview versions of mobile operating systems.

Comment Re:SubjectIsSubject (Score 2) 103

Kickstarter has been around since 2009. When is a company no longer considered a "startup"?

Generally, that mile stone is the IPO. Dividends begin some years after that, if ever. Since they are paying a dividend now, it suggests that Kickstarter does not intend to ever go public. Uber seems to be following a similar plan. I guess they don't want the scrutiny and regulation that comes with being a publicly traded company. I can understand that but on the other hand, some of those regulations are there for good reason.

Comment Stock price pump (Score 1) 78

Because one share is not much (too little to sell, really) I think many costumers will end up buying more shares, especially since they already have a connection to the company (own what you know). This might be enough to pump up the stock price beyond what T-mobile could have managed by just buying and retiring shares.

Comment No, because E-bikes mostly replace bicycles (Score 1) 271

And not cars.

The day that E-bikes take over in the US is the day *after* the bicycle infrastructure get so good, the distances so short, and the attitudes so much improved that everyone would be riding bicycles. This is unlikely. And if, somehow it did happen, it would actually be kind of sad. All that work to overhaul transportation, and Americans would still rather sit on their ass and coast rather than pedal.

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