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Comment Re:If the point was ... (Score 4, Insightful) 324

There's no proof that it has anything to do with Wikileaks, but in a world of IoT devices with no thought toward security, anyone who cares to do so can mount DDOS with the power of a national entity.

What's the point of doing what Assange and Wikileaks have been doing without any moral position? He isn't helping his own case.

Comment Re:Legal? (Score 2) 276

No, of course it is not legal to set a trap to intentionally hurt someone, even if you expect that the trap could only be activated by the person committing property theft or vandalism. Otherwise, you'd see shotguns built into burglar alarms.

Fire alarm stations sometimes shoot a blue dye which is difficult to remove or one which only shows under UV. Never stand in front of one when pulling the lever! But they are not supposed to hurt you.

And of course these booby traps generally are not as reliable as the so-called "inventor" thinks and tend to hurt the innocent.

Comment Re:Snake oil salesman (Score 1) 49

Ha ha. That's a common joke about the security industry. There is some truth to it.

What's great with bug bounty programs is that customers pay for results. You pay for valid and useful vulnerability reports. You don't pay for reports that are not useful. For hackers to make money (and the best ones make a lot of money), they must produce useful and relevant vulnerability reports.

That's a HUGE difference compared to traditional security products and services and it explains why bug bounty programs are becoming so popular. They are much more effective than any other method of finding vulns in live software.

Comment Re:70,000 white hat hackers? (Score 1) 49

Yep, 70,000 is a lot! The number keeps growing, and we hope to get to a million. To serve all companies and government organizations worldwide who will be needing bug bounty programs, we need a lot of excellent hackers.

It should also be noted that it takes a lot of hacking to find even a simple vulnerability. Of the 70,000 hacker accounts we have, about 1 in 6 have filed an actual vulnerability report. To help them get going, we have an ebook on hacking that we give to new hackers. Once new hackers get the hang of bug hunting they can advance fast, earning more and more reputation points. When you sign up at HackerOne, you start at 100 points. Our most prolific hackers have reached 10,000 points. You can do it, too!

Comment Re:Second coming of teams of ethical hackers (Score 1) 49

Yep this is true. It is also a common situation that humanity has dealt with successfully many times. To keep a ship afloat, you must find and fix every hole. Even one hole might sink it. To keep an aircraft safely flying, similarly every safety aspect must be in shape. Shipping and airlines have great safety track record these days.

To keep software secure, you must attempt to fix all serious vulnerabilities. You may never get to 100% vuln-free software, but the closer you get and the faster you can asymptotically move towards that goal, the more you reduce your cybersecurity risk.

Comment Re:Second coming of teams of ethical hackers (Score 2) 49

It has taken decades for the industry to get used to bug bounties. The first one was in 1981. Now it is starting to be very real. HackerOne has already paid out over $10,000 to hackers and researchers around the world. One hacker has made over half a million dollars. Another recently bought an apartment for his mother with the bounty money he had made. Still lots of work and education to do, but it is very much moving in the right direction. An example: the US DoD now committing $7m to vulnerability disclosure programs.

- Marten (HackerOne CEO)

User Journal

Journal Journal: Agorophobia 2

“Say, Ed! How was your trip? Lager?”
“Hi, John. Yeah, I’ll have a lager. The whole trip was lousy, a journey through hell all the way.”
“Didn't you fly Green-Osbourne?”
“Well, yeah.”
The bartender swore; he was a wealthy man who owned the bar he was tending and quite a bit of Green-Osbourne Transportation

Comment Re:Trump supporters? (Score 1) 40

That flag was the battle flag of an army who fought Unites States soldiers. As such, it belongs in the ranks of the Isis flag and the Nazi swastika.

And "overbearing federal government?" Hoo, boy... Here's a hint: Neighborhood associations are NOT part of the federal government.

Comment People have no couth. (Score 1) 5

The damned smart phones were invented fifty years too late, right when the GenXers were too busy to teach their kids manners. It's just plain RUDE to talk on the phone or text when you're having a conversation with someone else. Pulling out the phone when it hasn't rung is the height of rudeness.

Telephone etiquette was worked out a century ago. If you have compeny and the phone rings, you say "excuse me", answer the phone and say "I have company, can I call you back?" and the polite answer to that is "sure" unless it's an emergency.

My eighty eight year old mother rages about that behavior, and believes it's the smartphones themselves that causes it!

It isn't internet dysphoria, it's "I'm sick of assholes" dysphoria.

Submission + - Strange New World: Samba Server running on Windows ! ( 1

Jeremy Allison - Sam writes: "Do you know what this is? This is a non-Windows SMB file server running natively on Windows."

"To be more specific, this is a Virtualbox Ubuntu virtual machine running on Windows 10, grabbing a file across SMB from a Samba file server running inside the Windows Subsystem for Linux through Bash."

Comment Re:So, what's Soylent really about? (Score 1) 207

Like Boost, too much simple sugar.

Water, Corn Maltodextrin, Sugar, Blend of Vegetable Oils (Canola, Corn), Milk Protein Concentrate, Soy Protein Isolate, Cocoa Powder (Processed with Alkali). Less than 0.5% of: Nonfat Milk, Magnesium Phosphate, Sodium Citrate, Soy Lecithin, Natural & Artificial Flavor, Calcium Phosphate, Potassium Chloride, Cellulose Gum, Potassium Citrate, Choline Chloride, Ascorbic Acid, Cellulose Gel, Carrageenan, Salt, Ferric Phosphate, dl-Alpha-Tocopheryl Acetate, Zinc Sulfate, Niacinamide, Manganese Sulfate, Calcium Pantothenate, Copper Sulfate, Thiamine Chloride Hydrochloride, Vitamin A Palmitate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin, Folic Acid, Biotin, Chromium Chloride, Sodium Molybdate, Sodium Selenate, Potassium Iodide, Vitamin B12, Phylloquinone, and Vitamin D3.

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