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Comment Re:USPS (Score 1) 193

What's UPS going to charge you for a letter? $10?

Let's suppose we lived in that world. It's 2036, and sending a letter costs $10. Are you better off than you were in 1996 (when it cost 32 cents), or worse off?

We might be better off. Sure, it costs thirty times as much, but you might be having to do it less than a thirtieth as often. I'll admit my memory is foggy, but I'm pretty sure that every damn month I was having to mail multiple bill payments. That crap is over, and we're all happier for it, aren't we? Nowdays, I'm snailmailing infrequently enough that I don't even know if it's something I do twice a year, or once every two years, or what. It's getting hard to measure, but one thing's for sure: it ain't much.

$10 for a letter would be ok, if you almost never had to use it. And aren't we heading that way? Isn't nearly every instance (I'm trying to be open to there being some exceptions, though I'm actually drawing a blank right now) where you can't use email, a situation where you view the requirement as being a consequence of someone else's fuckup, incompetence, anachronism, etc? (e.g. this AC's idea that "my financial records where I need physical copies for tax audit purposes" is a feature of snailmail, rather than a defect in government's information-provenance-verification procedures.)

I'm not even necessarily advocating the death of USPS. Maybe they'll "rightsize" to fit the country's communications needs, such that they are the ones charging $10 to deliver a letter. It wouldn't be so bad, if overall, we still end up spending less.

Comment Re:Two types of laws (Score 1) 131

Not exactly a useful suggestion. Most traffic laws aren't about intent and if they were, not seeing a stop sign is not the same thing as not intending to roll past one. I can totally see someone whose brakes fail getting stop sign violation tickets thrown out of court, for example.

This case is typical of much of the anti-Clinton rumors we've seen lately. A germ of truth - that a Clinton employee might have asked Reddit for help to change email addresses on an exported file - has been whipped up into allegations that she ordered him to delete emails (not email addresses, emails), in some kind of attempt to cover something serious up.

Going back to the real allegation: OK, he asked to change email addresses on an export. So.... what's the scandal here? No seriously, those who aren't lying about what the allegation is are at least claiming it's evidence of evidence tampering - but what actually was tampered in such a way it would have materially affected an investigation?

What was he trying to do that would prevent Clinton from being criminally prosecuted? Anything at all? He's just changing email addresses in headers, not content. A single response to a message "From" Barack Obama that quotes the sent email as being actually "from" Colonel Gadaffi would be easily spotted.

The most likely reason the email addresses were changed was to prevent certain email addresses from becoming public.

Which is fine. No scandal.

We go through this bullshit every few months. Clinton's haters seem to be incapable of spending more than a few days without inventing some other crap. It sucks because we're probably going to spend the next four years seeing Clinton constantly investigated for non-issues, with government as dysfunctional as ever. It's part of why I'm reluctant to vote for her (but will, because I live in a swing state.)

User Journal

Journal Journal: What I think of you based on your politics

(0. You don't have the vote. Sit down, relax, and watch the fireworks I guess.)
1. You're voting for Trump because you agree with him or hate Clinton that much: You're probably a horrible person. You should definitely feel bad.
2. You're voting for Trump because you want to upend the establishment: I don't think you're very bright. Hey, I don't want to live in suburbia any more, but I'm not going to get out of it by committing a Federal felony and letting the FBI know. I'd rather bit

Comment Re:Commodore engineers (Score 2) 167

That works/worked* in the car industry where a car that's twenty five years old isn't typically much less advanced than one twenty years old. But in our industry?

Commodore's problem was more that they took an age to substantially improve the Amiga and make those improvements available. The A500 was more or less an A1000 in a keyboard case and was still being sold as one of TWO Amiga models five years later. And the A2000, the other model, wasn't more powerful than the A1000 (or A500), it was just more expandable. In the same year they finally relented and released the A3000, a 32 bit Amiga, but priced it way out of consideration for most people.

None of this was the engineers' fault it should be pointed out. While it took a while to come up with a better base chipset to replace OCS/ECS, the engineers were still belting out some fantastic designs, most of which were squished by upper management. Commodore Management's response to the increasing obsolescence of their low end model wasn't to replace it with something better, it was to replace it, at the same price, with the A600, a machine that was worse in almost every respect (well, it did have an IDE interface...), and which had been designed as a replacement for the Commodore 64.

Had the A3000 replaced the A2000 in 1990, with a similar upgrade given to the A500, I think Commodore might have stood a chance.

* OK, there's a reason I put 20 years there and "worked" - the car industry is genuinely going through a development phase which is nice to see.

Comment Re:Who said what? (Score 1) 377

The summary is fine. Pepe the Frog is a beloved meme, check. Pepe has been recently adopted by the far right, check. The only thing wrong is the headline, which can easily be misread as meaning the ADL has made a blanket "All uses of Pepe are examples of Hate".

The biggest thing that's wrong is... well, Slashdot's readers. Give them something you can easily misunderstand, and they'll launch half cocked, often with an interpretation even more stupid than the obvious misinterpretation.

And, BTW, to the OP of this thread: the ADL is one of the oldest surviving and famous groups that fights anti-semitism. It's hardly obscure, and a quick Google search would have given you the answer.

Comment Re:i.e. I think I can ignore the law if I want to (Score 1) 164

The trolls appear. The reason the U.S. exists is because it got tired of being England's whipping boy and paying tax after tax but getting nothing in return.

The colonies then pursued peaceful means by sending protest letter after protest letter to the King outlining the usurpations they were enduring and even suggested remedies.

In the end the King ignored all peaceful attempts at resolving the underlying issues. Only then did the colonists take up arms against those they perceived as oppressors.

Hardly ignoring the law.

Comment Re:No authority (Score 1) 66

The Senate, in conjunction with the House, can write laws to affect Yahoo! including requirements on reporting data breaches.

Yes, the Senate does have authority over Yahoo! and every other business in the country, especially when it pertains to people's personal information being stolen/hacked/whatever because quite obviously private industry doesn't give a crap how you might be affected.

Your statement would be like saying the Senate has no authority over the paper industry which dumps millions of gallons of polluted water back into streams and rivers.

Comment Re:Consumers (Score 1) 303

Try bandcamp.

Here, I'll start you off with some premium grade-A smokey music. Nope, that's not marijuana (though if that's your thing, it should still work out for you). Inhale again and you'll realize it's mesquite. I suppose the two are similar, because smelling this music gives me the munchies, except I don't wanna settle for anything less than slow-fuckin'-cooked brisket.

Comment Re:This simply means we're succeeding. (Score 1) 229

Not so fast.

Passenger air travel is becoming ever more fuel efficient. Airlines are keenly interested in the lowest fuel used per passenger seats, especially the low cost airlines. EasyJet's fleet (a low cost European airline) is almost brand new, same with RyanAir (who are notorious for making everything as cheap as possible). Not only do the airlines want efficient planes, but they want them as full as possible. EasyJet's load factor is 90% for example (meaning on average at least 90% of the seats are filled).

EasyJet's A319-neo aircraft have an average fuel burn (no wind) of about 2L/100km per passenger seat (about 115 mpg (US)). Adjusting with a 90% load factor about 103mpg per passenger flown. This is roughly equivalent to a reasonably efficient mid-size car carrying 3 people (note: most cars most of the time only carry 1 person), but remember the plane is doing 500+ mph while getting this efficiency, whereas the car will only be doing about 60mph to get that efficiency per seat.

A well-loaded electric train can better this of course, but airline travel isn't as absurdly fuel thirsty as you presume - there have been very impressive efficiency gains over time.

Comment Re:Reduced OS for short term gains. (Score 1) 56

In Android at least, only one application can be running at the same time (no background processing unless you program a service for your app)

Bollocks.

And the rest of what you say has nothing to do with Android or ChromeOS. You can have access to root in both. Android devices generally have it disabled but it can be enabled - of course, even CyanogenMod discourages root access these days, as it shouldn't be necessary. ChromeOS? Off by default, but every ChromeBook let's you reconfigure ChromeOS to allow root if you desperately want it. As for "Spyware", it's entirely up to you whether you use Google's services or not.

And none of your objections have anything to do with the original point. You're complaining about the UI disabling certain features. The underlying operating system has those features. And, frankly, easy access to root was something that Windows 95 gave you by default that NT made a little harder to get...

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