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Comment Re:Abandoning Time-Worn Processes Leads to Atrophy (Score 1) 153

But as far as I can tell, they're not making any statement about long term change at all - it's just that when you're using navigation assistance, the part of your brain which would otherwise handle that itself simply turns off.

I'm not sure what the problem is - other than the fact that, under those circumstances, your brain is not learning the route, I guess. And if that's what they're saying, I take issue with that. I've used Waze to get me to locations I've never visited, then subsequently been able to drive there unassisted.

Comment Abandoning Time-Worn Processes Leads to Atrophy (Score 5, Insightful) 153

Scientists determined that those people who made use of machine washing rather than hand washing had diminished hand strength and neurological motor communication necessary for fine motor control. Seamstresses who bought thread rather than using the spinning jenny were similarly impaired. But worst off were teamsters who used the internal combustion trucks rather than teams of horses and used forklifts and other mechanical devices rather than loading their vehicles by hand. Their overall body strength was much reduced.

Comment Pity, since I can't accept the EULA (Score 1) 132

Google's Chrome browser, on the other hand, remained unhackable during the contest.

Unfortunately for me, I can't accept Chrome's EULA.

It incorporates Adobe's, which (if I recall correctly from my AT&T Android-based smartphone) has several clauses I can't abide - including a never-compete, don't block updates, don't work on circumvention tools, we can change the license without notice, ...

I don't intend to do anything that might come back to limit my future software work or employability. Clicking through such a license (even if every bit of it is struck down by the courts - which I'm not holding my breath expecting), especially on a device that "phones home" in a way that is easily identified with my true name, is an invitation for an all-versus-one gladiatorial match with two multibillion-dollar corporations' legal departments.

Comment Bosco (Score 1) 57

One limitation of the one-time code, though, is that it won't work on the secure doors that many branches have for non-business hours that require a customer to swipe an ATM or debit card to gain entry. Wells Fargo said those secure doors are found at a small percentage of branches, mostly in major metropolitan areas like New York City or Chicago.

George, tell him your code. Shout out your code, man!

Comment Impressive work. (Score 4, Insightful) 65

Aside from the egregious delay in fixing these things; does anyone else get a very, very, bad feeling about the expected quality of the firmware when 'supply a string longer than a normal user would type' is a successful attack?

If you aren't sanitizing your inputs against that one; what are you sanitizing?

Comment GitHub is in California (Score 1) 74

I struggle a bit to understand why this isn't a bigger issue. ... I wonder why some politician hasn't attempted to differentiate themselves by even mentioning the stifling effect on innovation [company-owns-all-your-inventions] policies impose.

Because it's already been adressed, long ago.

GitHub is in San Francisco, which is in California and governed by California labor law.

California labor law says that (paraphrasing from memory):
  - As a compelling state interest
  - overriding anything in the employee agreement
  - if an employee invents something
  - while not on company time or using company resources
  - and that invention is not in the company's current or immediately foreseeable business
  - then the invention belongs to the employee
  - (and the employment agreement must include a copy of this information as an appendix.)

(IMHO that law is THE reason for the explosive growth and innovation in Silicon Valley and why other states have been unable to clone it. Invent something that your current company won't use, get together with a couple friends, maybe get some "angel funding", rent the office across the street, and go into business with your new shiny thing. So companies bud off new companies like yeast. And innovators collect where they can become the inventor, the "couple of friends", or the early hires, creating a pool of the necessary talent to convert inventions into companies when they happen.)

What GitHub has apparently done is say to the employees:
"For the purposes of us claiming your IP, your lunch time and breaks are your time, even on company property, and your use of our computers and disk storage for things like compiles, storing code, and web research in aid of your project, does not count as 'using company resources'."

In other states, and other companies even within CA, that might be a big deal. For a company in CA, whose whole business model is providing archives for other people's software projects - and giving it away free to small groups, while charging large groups (or small groups that grow into large groups), it's not a big deal, and right IN their business model.

Comment Re:This Worked So Well For Yahoo! (Score 1) 289

Didn't Yahoo! do something similar shortly before tanking? It seems pretty short-sighted to make oneself less competitive at attracting technical workers in the U.S. at a time when many are predicting increased competition for U.S. technical workers.

Nonsense - it worked out very well for Marissa Meyer, who is the one that made that decision at Yahoo.

Comment Re:Its rather exaggerated (Score 1) 61

But with potentially only 33,000 rewrite cycles per cell to failure that's seriously problematic. (And that's the best guess, since Intel won't actually tell us what the cell durability is).

I can guarantee you it's not 33.000 R/W cycles - the only tech that would allow that is SLC, and practically nobody sells SSD based on SLC anymore. A few manufacturers sell highly overpriced SLC-based SD and microSD cards. Hell, nowadays you'll struggle to even find MLC-based SSDs (~10.000 rewrite cycles AT BEST). Every SSD manufacturer today uses TLC, which means 1000 R/W cycles per cell.

Comment Re:Mercator straight lines are not great circles! (Score 1) 318

Ironically, that's the main sense in which arguments that Mercator projections are 'imperialist' aren't total nonsense:

You don't 'imperialize' by drawing the other guy's country really small and hurting his feelings; you do so by having the maritime expertise to deliver troops and maintain supply lines across large areas of the world; and conquering the other guy's country.

As a rather useful projection for navigation, Mercator can definitely help you out with that; the wonky land areas are just a minor side effect.

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