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Submission + - Phony Ubuntu website possibly serving malware 4

An anonymous reader writes: If you accidentally misspell Ubuntu while typing in the address, you may end up at http://uhuntu.com/ . Spelling Ubuntu with an "h" instead of a "b" takes you to a website that looks just like Canonicals Ubuntu website. No word on whether or not they are serving malware ridden Ubuntu ISOs, so watch what you type into that address bar.

Submission + - As Linux Turns 25: Torvalds Credits GPL for Sucess (eweek.com)

darthcamaro writes: There are a lot of things that make Linux work and today at the LinuxCon conference in Toronto, 25 years after he first announced Linux, Linus Torvalds talked about the highlight and the low-lights of Linux (so far). For low lights he talked about the process challenges during the Linux 2.4 timeframe. When asked why Linux hasn't ended up fragmented like UNIX — Torvalds had an easy answer — the GPL.

I love the GPL and see it as a defining factor in the success of Linux," Torvalds said.


Submission + - Something "Unexpected" Happened When Seattle Raised The Minimum Wage

schwit1 writes: The latest research comes from the University of Washington which researched the impact of Seattle's recent minimum wage hike on employment in that city (as background, Seattle recently passed legislation that increased it's minimum wage to $11 per hour on April 1, 2015, $13 on January 1, 2016 and $15 on January 1, 2017). "Shockingly", the University of Washington found that Seattle's higher minimum wages "lowered employment rates of low-wage workers" (the report is attached in its entirety at the end of this post).

Yet, our best estimates find that the Seattle Minimum Wage Ordinance appears to have lowered employment rates of low-wage workers. This negative unintended consequence (which are predicted by some of the existing economic literature) is concerning and needs to be followed closely in future years, because the long-run effects are likely to be greater as businesses and workers have more time to adapt to the ordinance. Finally, we find only modest impacts on earnings. The effects of disemployment appear to be roughly offsetting the gain in hourly wage rates, leaving the earnings for the average low-wage worker unchanged. Of course, we are talking about the average result.



More specifically, we find that median wages for low-wage workers (those earning less than $11 per hour during the 2nd quarter of 2014) rose by $1.18 per hour, and we estimate that the impact of the Ordinance was to increase these workers’ median wage by $0.73 per hour. Further, while these low-wage workers increased their likelihood of being employed relative to prior years, this increase was less than in comparison regions. We estimate that the impact of the Ordinance was a 1.1 percentage point decrease in likelihood of low-wage Seattle workers remaining employed. While these low-wage workers increased their quarterly earnings relative to prior years, the estimated impact of the Ordinance on earnings is small and sensitive to the choice of comparison region. Finally, for those who kept their job, the Ordinance appears to have improved wages and earnings, but decreased their likelihood of being employed in Seattle relative other parts of the state of Washington.

Still not convinced? How about a recent report from the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco that finds that "higher minimum wage results in some job loss for the least-skilled workers—with possibly larger adverse effects than earlier research suggested."

Comment Re:By Hack it, they mean work for 2 bucks an hour. (Score 1) 472

What are you talking about? Of course they are worth the money. You take a department with 10 employees processing ar/ap and have 5 software engineers automate it. The salary is well worth the replacement of those 10 person departments at hundreds of businesses with software programs and teams of implementation engineers that bill 250/hr for about 8 months until either they get some fragile solution up and running or get replaced by another team of implementation engineers who bill 250/hr to implement the software that their 5 software engineers wrote.....

Submission + - Laid-Off Americans, Required to Zip Lips on Way Out, Grow Bolder (nytimes.com)

Indigo writes: New York Times: American corporations are under new scrutiny from federal lawmakers after well-publicized episodes in which the companies laid off American workers and gave the jobs to foreigners on temporary visas.

But while corporate executives have been outspoken in defending their labor practices before Congress and the public, the American workers who lost jobs to global outsourcing companies have been largely silent.

Until recently. Now some of the workers who were displaced are starting to speak out, despite severance agreements prohibiting them from criticizing their former employers.

Submission + - Companies Finding It Harder To Conceal H1-B Abuses (nytimes.com)

JustAnotherOldGuy writes: In America, it's common practice to make severance pay for laid-off workers contingent on signing a "nondisparagement clause" that prohibits workers from ever speaking ill of their former employers. But as more and more layoffs are precipitated by illegal practices like hiring H1B visa-holders and forcing existing workers to train them as a condition of severance bonuses, workers are growing bolder and refusing to sign gag-clauses — or breaking them and daring their former employers to sue. Marco Peña was among about 150 technology workers who were laid off in April by Abbott Laboratories, but he decided not to sign the agreement that was given to all departing employees, which included a nondisparagement clause. Mr. Peña said his choice cost him at least $10,000 in severance pay. “I just didn’t feel right about signing,” Mr. Peña said. “The clauses were pretty blanket. I felt like they were eroding my rights," he revealed in an expose by the New York Times.

Submission + - Visual Studio 2015 c++ compiler secretly inserts telemetry code into binaries (infoq.com) 4

edxwelch writes: Reddit user "sammiesdog" discovered recently that the Visual Studio 2015 c++ compiler was inserting calls to a Microsoft telemetery function into binaries.
"I compiled a simple program with only main(). When looking at the compiled binary in Ida, I see a calls for telemetry_main_invoke_trigger and telemetry_main_return_trigger. I can not find documentation for these calls, either on the web or in the options page."
Only after the discovery did Steve Carroll, the dev manager for Visual C++, admit to the feature and posted a work around. The "feature" is to be removed in Update 3 of the product.

Submission + - Think Tank Blames Wide Disparity in AP CS Test Scores on Inadequate Instruction 1

theodp writes: The Case for Improving U.S. Computer Science Education — a new report from the Information Technology & Innovation Foundation — calls for the U.S. to train and certify 10,000 additional CS teachers "to have high-quality CS courses as common in high schools as calculus courses." Why? "The AP computer science exam has the widest standard deviation of any AP test, and the highest proportion of students receiving a 1, the lowest possible score," the authors explain. "This wide disparity between students who do well and those who do not implies that the quality of many AP computer science courses is highly variable and that many students of advanced computer science courses do not receive adequate instruction."

Comment Cory Doctorow is right There is a war... (Score 1) 535

...on general computing going on. If you can't load this onto a 'handset' what is there stopping google from broadening what is defined as a handset as to restrict developers to specific closed development platforms. We are back to paying 10000 for an intellec8 dev station; living in the nintendo and sony world...

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