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Submission + - Clinton Campaign, DNC Coordinated With Organizations To Incite Violence At Trump ( 7

Kneo24 writes: In a video shown by independent investigative reporter James O'keefe, you can see that there was collusion between Clinton's campaign and the DNC, to incite riots and violence at Trump's rallies. One of the key operatives states: "It doesn’t matter what the friggin’ legal and ethics people say, we need to win this motherfucker."

Submission + - Music recorded on Ferranti 1 computer (

eionmac writes: Many years ago I trained with Basil de Ferranti and wrote 'machine code' . Ah! Recordings of music on an early computer has been restored (speed change to make playable) Listen to the German hymn (Used by UK) and some other tunes in "RAW form"

Submission + - Commodore C64 Survives Over 25 Years Balancing Drive Shafts In Auto Repair Shop (

MojoKid writes: One common gripe in the twenty-first century is that nothing is built to last anymore. Even complex, expensive computers seem to have a relatively short shelf-life nowadays. However, one computer in a small auto repair shop in Gdansk, Poland has survived for the last twenty-five years against all odds. The computer in question here is a Commodore C64 that has been balancing driveshafts non-stop for a quarter of a century. The C64C looks like it would fit right in with a scene from Fallout 4 and has even survived a nasty flood. This Commodore 64 contains a few homemade aspects, however. The old computer uses a sinusoidal waveform generator and piezo vibration sensor in order to measure changes in pressure, acceleration, temperature, strain or force by converting them to an electrical charge. The C64C interprets these signals to help balance the driveshafts in vehicles.

Submission + - How ITT Tech Screwed Students and Made Millions (

An anonymous reader writes: This is a grim story about a company that screwed poor people, military veterans, and taxpayers to turn a profit. It includes shocking details about the inner-working of the for-profit college including stuff like this:

"ITT recruiters even manipulated prospective students using pain-based sales techniques. Recruiters used a sales strategy called the “Pain Funnel” that encouraged them to ask progressively more hurtful questions to get prospective students to enroll in the school."

Submission + - Police forces are stockpiling massive databases with personal information

Presto Vivace writes: The Post and Courier

A person can end up in one of these databases by doing nothing more than sitting on a public park bench or chatting with an officer on the street. Once there, these records can linger forever and be used by police agencies to track movements, habits, acquaintances and associations – even a person’s marital and job status, The Post and Courier found in an investigation of police practices around the nation. ... What began as a method for linking suspicious behavior to crime has morphed into a practice that threatens to turn local police departments into miniature versions of the National Security Agency. In the process, critics contend, police risk trampling constitutional rights, tarnishing innocent people and further eroding public trust.

Submission + - How Spy Tech Firms Let Governments See Everything on a Smartphone (

schwit1 writes: Want to invisibly spy on 10 iPhone owners without their knowledge? Gather their every keystroke, sound, message and location? That will cost you $650,000, plus a $500,000 setup fee with an Israeli outfit called the NSO Group. You can spy on more people if you would like — just check out the company’s price list.

The NSO Group is one of a number of companies that sell surveillance tools that can capture all the activity on a smartphone, like a user’s location and personal contacts. These tools can even turn the phone into a secret recording device.

What that gets you, NSO Group documents say, is “unlimited access to a target’s mobile devices.” In short, the company says: You can “remotely and covertly collect information about your target’s relationships, location, phone calls, plans and activities — whenever and wherever they are.”

And, its proposal adds, “It leaves no traces whatsoever.”

Submission + - Phony Ubuntu website possibly serving malware 4

An anonymous reader writes: If you accidentally misspell Ubuntu while typing in the address, you may end up at . Spelling Ubuntu with an "h" instead of a "b" takes you to a website that looks just like Canonicals Ubuntu website. No word on whether or not they are serving malware ridden Ubuntu ISOs, so watch what you type into that address bar.

Submission + - As Linux Turns 25: Torvalds Credits GPL for Sucess (

darthcamaro writes: There are a lot of things that make Linux work and today at the LinuxCon conference in Toronto, 25 years after he first announced Linux, Linus Torvalds talked about the highlight and the low-lights of Linux (so far). For low lights he talked about the process challenges during the Linux 2.4 timeframe. When asked why Linux hasn't ended up fragmented like UNIX — Torvalds had an easy answer — the GPL.

I love the GPL and see it as a defining factor in the success of Linux," Torvalds said.

Submission + - Something "Unexpected" Happened When Seattle Raised The Minimum Wage

schwit1 writes: The latest research comes from the University of Washington which researched the impact of Seattle's recent minimum wage hike on employment in that city (as background, Seattle recently passed legislation that increased it's minimum wage to $11 per hour on April 1, 2015, $13 on January 1, 2016 and $15 on January 1, 2017). "Shockingly", the University of Washington found that Seattle's higher minimum wages "lowered employment rates of low-wage workers" (the report is attached in its entirety at the end of this post).

Yet, our best estimates find that the Seattle Minimum Wage Ordinance appears to have lowered employment rates of low-wage workers. This negative unintended consequence (which are predicted by some of the existing economic literature) is concerning and needs to be followed closely in future years, because the long-run effects are likely to be greater as businesses and workers have more time to adapt to the ordinance. Finally, we find only modest impacts on earnings. The effects of disemployment appear to be roughly offsetting the gain in hourly wage rates, leaving the earnings for the average low-wage worker unchanged. Of course, we are talking about the average result.

More specifically, we find that median wages for low-wage workers (those earning less than $11 per hour during the 2nd quarter of 2014) rose by $1.18 per hour, and we estimate that the impact of the Ordinance was to increase these workers’ median wage by $0.73 per hour. Further, while these low-wage workers increased their likelihood of being employed relative to prior years, this increase was less than in comparison regions. We estimate that the impact of the Ordinance was a 1.1 percentage point decrease in likelihood of low-wage Seattle workers remaining employed. While these low-wage workers increased their quarterly earnings relative to prior years, the estimated impact of the Ordinance on earnings is small and sensitive to the choice of comparison region. Finally, for those who kept their job, the Ordinance appears to have improved wages and earnings, but decreased their likelihood of being employed in Seattle relative other parts of the state of Washington.

Still not convinced? How about a recent report from the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco that finds that "higher minimum wage results in some job loss for the least-skilled workers—with possibly larger adverse effects than earlier research suggested."

Comment Re:By Hack it, they mean work for 2 bucks an hour. (Score 1) 472

What are you talking about? Of course they are worth the money. You take a department with 10 employees processing ar/ap and have 5 software engineers automate it. The salary is well worth the replacement of those 10 person departments at hundreds of businesses with software programs and teams of implementation engineers that bill 250/hr for about 8 months until either they get some fragile solution up and running or get replaced by another team of implementation engineers who bill 250/hr to implement the software that their 5 software engineers wrote.....

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I'm still waiting for the advent of the computer science groupie.