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Comment Re:Supply and Demand - where is the demand? (Score 1) 375

Several million times a year, guns are used to deter or prevent crime. Most of those are merely showing the gun or announcing its presence. Very very few of these make the news, because they are boring. But they work because guns are simple and effective. If all guns were smart guns, they'd bo so unreliable that very few criminals would be deterred by them, and crime would skyrocket.

On, and all your police would be be effectively disarmed too. Unless of course you think police (who commit more crimes off-duty than conceal carriers) are more responsible than "civilians".

Fuck off, slaver who is too stupid to think.

Comment Re:If the point was ... (Score 4, Insightful) 317

There's no proof that it has anything to do with Wikileaks, but in a world of IoT devices with no thought toward security, anyone who cares to do so can mount DDOS with the power of a national entity.

What's the point of doing what Assange and Wikileaks have been doing without any moral position? He isn't helping his own case.

Comment Re:Legal? (Score 2) 264

No, of course it is not legal to set a trap to intentionally hurt someone, even if you expect that the trap could only be activated by the person committing property theft or vandalism. Otherwise, you'd see shotguns built into burglar alarms.

Fire alarm stations sometimes shoot a blue dye which is difficult to remove or one which only shows under UV. Never stand in front of one when pulling the lever! But they are not supposed to hurt you.

And of course these booby traps generally are not as reliable as the so-called "inventor" thinks and tend to hurt the innocent.

Comment Re:First lesson (Score 4, Interesting) 134

I have two major beefs with IPV6. The first is that the end-point 2^48 switch address space wasn't well thought-through. Hey, wouldn't it be great if we didn't have to use NAT and give all of those IOT devices their own IPV6 address? Well... no actually, NAT does a pretty good job of obscuring the internal topology of the end-point network. Just having a statefull firewall and no NAT exposes the internal topology. Not such a good idea.

The second is that all the discovery protocols were left unencrypted and made complex enough to virtually guarantee a plethora of possible exploits. Some have been discovered and fixed, I guarantee there are many more in the wings. IPV4 security is a well known problem with well known solutions. IPV6 security is a different beast entirely.

Other problems including the excessively flexible protocol layering allowing for all sorts of encapsulation tricks (some of which have already been demonstrated), pasting on a 'mandatory' IPSEC without integration with a mandatory secure validation framework (making it worthless w/regards to generic applications being able to assert a packet-level secure connection), assumptions that the address space would be too big to scan (yah right... the hackers didn't get that memo my tcpdump tells me), not making use of MAC-layer features that would have improved local LAN security, if only a little. Also idiotically and arbitrarily blocking off a switch subspace, eating 48 bits for no good reason and trying to disallow routing within that space (which will soon have to be changed considering that number of people who want to have stateful *routers* to break up their sub-48-bit traffic and who have no desire whatsoever to treat those 48 bits as one big switched sub-space).

The list goes on. But now we are saddled with this pile, so we have to deal with it.


Comment Flood defenses? (Score 5, Informative) 134

There is no flood defense possible for most businesses at the tail-end of the pipe. When an attacker pushes a terrabit/s at you and at all the routers in the path leading to you as well as other leafs that terminate at those routers, from 3 million different IP addresses from compromised IOT devices, your internet pipes are dead, no matter how much redundancy you have.

Only the biggest companies out there can handle these kinds of attacks. The backbone providers have some defenses, but it isn't as simple as just blocking a few IPs.


Comment Best fix for poverty is removing regulation (Score 1) 1

One of the worst aspects of the regulatory state is how it gets in the way of people helping themselves. Occupational licensing, state-sponsored cartels like taxis, land zoning, regulations which prevent people planting vegetable gardens, all these things hit the self-supporting the most. Minimum wage laws hurt the unskilled by cutting back the opportunity to learn skills from entry level jobs. Too many places even make it illegal to feed the poor without restaurant-level food prep, or for groceries to give away food on its sell-by date, or fruit and veggies which are too ugly for commercial sale.

US local, state, and federal governments spend $7-8 trillion every year, which is around $50,000 for every household in this country. It's amazing that people have anything left for themselves, and since income taxes don't come close to matching this, it must come from sales taxes (10%), property taxes, business taxes (35%, I think, which is just passed on to consumers), and all the other taxes that are hidden away and people aren't aware of. This is an incredible drag on the economy -- 40% of GDP. Estimates are that somewhere around 15% of the work force get their pay from taxpayers -- whether directly (employees, military) or indirectly (military and other contractors).

Certainly a lot of this would be spent anyway (roads, schools), but competition would make it cheaper, better, and more innovative.

If welfare were cut way back to the essentials of people who cannot take care of themselves, if unemployment insurance were obtained privately like car and home insurance and related directly to work record, if health care were privately obtained and insurance was strictly for catastrophes, and if the poor and unskilled could help themselves by cutting hair for friends and neighbors without six months or a year of full time schooling, if neighbors could baby sit for neighbors without government regulators setting standards that parents are better able to judge -- if, if if the government would just stop making it so hard for people to help themselves --- the need for government welfare would drop like a rock. /rant

Comment Re:Interesting, Dave Chappelle. (Score 1) 550

So, smokers yes, races no.


In your fallacious example, you attempt to conflate an activity with a state of being. You cannot ban a black person for being black. Likewise, you cannot ban a smoker for being a smoker. However, you can ban the activity of smoking in your venue.

Comment Re:Let's not forget... (Score 1) 99

Your theory requires a constant level of habitable terrain that humans merely need to move fast enough to exploit. It totally ignores the more likely scenario -- The Sahara will remain an uninhabitable dessert, and North America, South America, Australasia and Eurasia will join it.

Why do you believe that your scenario is more likely, when it's not a scenario with any support in the climate science as documented by the IPCC?

Comment Re:No, it's not time. (Score 1) 183

You just use the scroll-wheel. The scroll bar is always a last resort. I prefer the scroll-wheel myself, but if the system doesn't have a mouse -- that is, one only has the trackpad, then either two-finger scrolling (Apple style) or one-finger-right-side-of-pad scrolling is a pretty good substitute.


Comment Primary problem is the touchpad hardware (Score 1) 183

The real problem is the touchpad hardware. The touchpad device itself may not be able to accurately track three or four fingers, and there isn't a thing the operating system can do to fix it. I've noticed this on chromebooks, in particular when I ported the touchpad driver for the Acer C720. The hardware gets very confused if you put more than two fingers down on the pad horizontally (or you cross them horizontally while you slide your fingers around).

It basically makes using more than two fingers very unreliable. My presumption is that a lot of laptops out there with these pads probably have the same hardware limitations.


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