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Submission + - 'Star Trek' actor who played Chekov, dead at age 27 (

An anonymous reader writes: "The young actor who played Chekov in the newer "Star Trek" movies has died tragically at age 27.

Anton Yelchin was killed in a car crash early Sunday morning on June 19, 2016, according to his publicist.

Yelchin started small with roles in indie films and various television shows, before breaking out in films like "Alpha Dog" and the teenage comedy "Charlie Bartlett." His biggest role to date has been in the rebooted "Star Trek" films. The third reboot, "Star Trek Beyond," is in theaters in July 2016.

Yelchin was born in Russia. His parents were professional figure skaters who moved the family to the United States when Yelchin was a baby."

Submission + - Due process is under assault in America (

An anonymous reader writes: Due process isn’t the sexiest part of the Constitution. It doesn’t get all the attention like the First or Second Amendments. But it is so incredibly important to the foundation of our country that it’s painful to see the hits it’s been taking these past few years.

The latest attempt has been incredibly direct, with Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., declaring that “due process is what’s killing us right now.” Manchin’s comments came in response to the Orlando terrorist attack that killed 49 people and injured 53 more. Speaking on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe,” Manchin said that due process was keeping legislators from banning those on the Terrorist Watch List from purchasing guns.

“The problem we have, and really the firewall we have right now, is due process,” Manchin said Thursday. “It’s all due process.”

Darn that pesky due process and its constitutional protections!

Manchin is just the latest pol to advocate trampling on Americans’ constitutional rights. On Wednesday, a number of pols told my colleague Joel Gehrke that the presumption of innocence was unnecessary when government seeks to deprive someone of a constitutional right.

Submission + - Tesla's Model 3 Hype May Be Hiding Problems

Daetrin writes: Every time a story about Elon Musk comes up on Slashdot there are those that complain that there is too much hype about him and his companies. That "hype" has been in full swing with the Model 3 announcement, but the Daily Beast has put forth a case that such skepticism is entirely justified and that the $115 million of Model 3 preorders is actually a sign of problems to come for Tesla and Musk. "It won't hit the road for two years, it won't be as cheap as promised, and it will be plagued with problems. Worst of all, the firm may run out of money before the car takes the road." Are the problems real? Or is this anti-hype just a cynical attempt to ride the coattails of the hype?

Submission + - Firefox 29 is a Flop; UI Design Trends Getting Worse 2

An anonymous reader writes: Firefox 29 marked the release of the UI overhaul codenamed "Australis" and the jury is back with a verdict: the vast majority of feedback on Firefox Input is negative and traffic to the Classic Theme Restorer add-on has aggressively spiked since Firefox 29 came out on April 29. Considering this is a year and a half after the backlash against the new Windows 8 user interface, it seems that even though the "dumbing down" trends in UI design are infuriating users, they continue to happen. Chrome will soon be hiding URLs, OS X has hidden scroll bars by default, iOS 7 flattened everything, and Windows 8 made scroll bars hard to see. If most users hate these changes, why are they so ubiquitous?

Submission + - Facebook retaliates; says 'Princeton may be in danger of disappearing entirely' (

hypnosec writes: A recent report from two Princeton researchers claimed that Facebook is like an infectious disease currently experiencing a spike before its decline and will lose 80 percent of its user base by 2017, which caught attention of Facebook and in its reply the social networking giant claimed that ‘Princeton may be in danger of disappearing entirely’. Facebook data scientists Mike Develin, Lada Adamic, and Sean Taylor used some of the same techniques used by Princeton researchers to arrive at their conclusion. The trio used parameters such as Facebook Likes, Percentage of Princeton papers in journals, student enrolment, and Google Trends.

Submission + - CmdrTaco Launches Trove, a Curated News Startup (

jigamo writes: The Verge reports:

A long list of startups have put forth a Herculean effort to find the best way to suggest new things for people to read, and former Slashdot editor-in-chief Rob Malda, also known as CmdrTaco, just unveiled his: Trove, a people-powered app initially available on the web and for iPhone and iPad.

Trove basically lets users opt in to feeds of stories that align with their interests. Users are encouraged to curate "troves," collections of stories that relate to a particular theme. You could create a trove for "Ukrainian Politics," "Dog Heroes," or "Best of The Verge," for example, to which other Trove users can subscribe.

"The core of the product is that people have many interests and rather than just giving them information through pure algorithms and picking particular publications, we want to connect them with people who share those interests, who can pick the best content in those topical areas," says Vijay Ravindran, CEO of Trove.

Submission + - Supercomputer smashes simulation speed record 1

Lank writes: A team of computer scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have managed to coordinate nearly 2 million cores to achieve a blistering 504 billion events per second, over 40 times faster than the previous record. This result was achieved on Sequoia, a 120-rack IBM Blue Gene/Q normally used to run classified nuclear simulations. Note: I am a co-author of the coming paper to appear in PADS 2013.

Google Pledges Not To Sue Any Open Source Projects Using Their Patents 153

sfcrazy writes "Google has announced the Open Patent Non-Assertion (OPN) Pledge. In the pledge Google says that they will not sue any user, distributor, or developer of Open Source software on specified patents, unless first attacked. Under this pledge, Google is starting off with 10 patents relating to MapReduce, a computing model for processing large data sets first developed at Google. Google says that over time they intend to expand the set of Google's patents covered by the pledge to other technologies." This is in addition to the Open Invention Network, and their general work toward reforming the patent system. The patents covered in the OPN will be free to use in Free/Open Source software for the life of the patent, even if Google should transfer ownership to another party. Read the text of the pledge. It appears that interaction with non-copyleft licenses (MIT/BSD/Apache) is a bit weird: if you create a non-free fork it appears you are no longer covered under the pledge.

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Doubt is not a pleasant condition, but certainty is absurd. - Voltaire