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Comment Re:Reverse engineering (Score 1) 502

Yeah, because as we all know Obama inherited a great economy and Trump a crappy one...oh wait thats right, reality is Republicans greatest enemy. There is a huge difference between policies enacted by a president and the fallout from that vs the conditions of the country when said person became president. If there were massive #s of terrorists from these countries in the US currently then yes you could blame Obama. But us grown ups like to live in what is called the "evidence based world". You should join, then you can see what a insecure clown Trump really is. I mean ALL HAIL THE GREAT AND GIGANTIC PENISED TRUMP!

Comment Fundamental Missing Features (Score 3, Insightful) 449

Forget compiled languages. That's not fun.

We want command based (imperative) languages that can be run in a REPL for fun. BASIC basically fits this.

Take Python as a contemporary example. Now look at how many basic features of interactivity are NOT enabled in an easy way in Python by default: LOCATE, INKEY, SOUND, PLAY, SCREEN, PSET, LINE, CIRCLE, PGET.

Just these. You can't do ANY of these things in Python with a basic install. "Yes," if you have tkinter in your install, you kind of can. But it's hairy and complex. It's not anywhere near as simple or accessible as BASIC. Pygmy makes some of these things possible, but those are further steps of installation away, and the interactivity feels further away.

Line numbers are incredibly simple (read: understandable) as a flow control model. "Why Johnny Can't Code" outlined the problem with mandatory complex abstract control structures.

I think there are basic fundamental missing pieces in the contemporary programming environment, and that the industry is worse for it.

Comment Re: Beta versioning (Score 1) 143

Yeah, I could do that easily enough but it's money I'd rather not spend. DVDs are kind of dead media now, that's where this branch of the discussion originated. I skipped the whole BD hardware era because BDRips are easy enough to find online. I used to do a lot of DVD mastering with DVD Studio Pro but I haven't touched it in years, everyone wants files for online delivery now. For the rare occasions I would ever need a DVD drive, the kludgy Remote Drive is good enough.

Comment Re: Beta versioning (Score 1) 143

Well that's another problem right there. My mini doesn't have a DVD drive, if I want to rip a DVD I have to use Remote Drive and link to my old G4 Windtunnel machine, the last machine I owned with an internal DVD drive. So I usually just copy the VOB to my local Mini and transcode it there. I don't know if that is any faster or slower, I have nothing to compare it to, I haven't ripped a DVD in years probably. In transcoding, Handbrake will peg the CPU but I don't recall exact fps, something around 100 I think. It's an old dual core i7, it's no speed demon. Jeez, I remember when I got a PowerPC G5 and I thought it was a fucking miracle that I was able to encode mpegs for DVDs in just a bit faster than 1x realtime. The G5 would kick out so much waste heat, my office temperature would get up to over 100F.

Comment Re: Beta versioning (Score 1) 143

It would be difficult to judge by my encoding times, I'm using an antique Mac mini 2011 model with a 2.7Ghz i7. I have an SSD but encoding is CPU intensive so the CPU is the bottleneck. I haven't done any direct comparisons at similar encoding rates, the Compressor settings are so dissimilar that I'm not sure how I'd even compare them to Handbrake. But overall Compressor seems more flexible and faster. Apple pro apps tend to use multithreading very efficiently so they're fast on multicore computers like mine (i7 with 2 real cores, 4 virtual cores).

Comment Re: Beta versioning (Score 1) 143

There's something ironic about the fact that it got out of beta long after the media it originally supported went extinct - it's a little late.

Be fair, it does a good job of transcoding. I tried using the previous version of Handbrake to transcode some video files that wouldn't play on my iPhone, it was good enough. But I use a Mac and the feature to add a batch of files all at once is missing from that version, so it was a bit inconvenient to set up a big encoding run one file at a time. Maybe they added it to this release. But ultimately since I'm on a Mac and I have Final Cut Pro, it's faster for me to use Compressor.app.

Comment Re:Praying (Score 1) 118

That's actually what motivates a lot of western terrorists. Look at most of them(Al-waki, the Nice terrorist, the Charlie Hebdo guys, the Orlando shooter, the list goes on) and you will find that most of them lead very "sinful" lives before "finding" religion and then committing terrorist acts

The religious leaders convince them that they aren't at fault for "succumbing" to sin, its the fault of society for allowing them to fail in the first place, thus the "logical" conclusion for them is to attempt to change the society so it won't allow such sin in the future by installing Sharia law. First step in doing so is obviously killing as many infidels as possible....

Comment Movie Makers do NOT get money from candy. (Score 1) 341

...that by offering you new titles so early they are going to lose on all the overpriced cold drinks, and snacks they sell you at the theatre.

This is incorrect. Movie theaters make ZERO money on ticket sales for the first few weeks, then a small portion of the ticket sale, and then eventually a good portion. Pretty much ALL ticket money goes to the makers of the movie.

THE REASON why you have those overpriced drinks and such, is because it's the only source of income for the movie theater itself.

Comment Re:Give up (Score 1) 435

I'm 39, I've been programming since I was 6. I relate to this completely.

I observe, as Alan Kay has observed, that the industry is fad-driven and youth-focused. I remember when Node.js was exploding out, and asking myself, "What's the big deal here?" People were getting insanely excited about... ...call-backs. As if it were this bold new paradigm in programming.

I think what happens is that young people get into programming, discover some idea, and then hype the fuck out of it. Other new programmers hear this idea, their brain explodes, and they start tapping the shoulders of all the other young programmers. Next thing you know, they all want to learn this programming language and it's the best thing in 4ever.

I have a very hard time getting excited about most "new" technologies; I have a very hard time getting excited about most "new" **ideas.** Reason being: I see very little that is new in them, a lot that is very old, and I see terrible implementations behind them most of the time.

I often find myself asking:
* "Why not just use TCP sockets, cron, and a couple hundred LOC, rather than importing this entire massive technology stack?"
* "I hate to be a jerk, but do you know it should only require about 12 bytes of data to store each entry here?"
* "Have you thought about using shared memory here?"

I see far more work going into sorting out and arguing for technology stack X vs. Y, rather than in what the problem actually is, and what would be the simplest and most direct way of solving it. Then our energy is lost in upgrade hell, attack vectors, and work-arounds for simple things that are very basic but didn't happen to be included in the stack.

I have seen more code written in work-arounds and patches and side-solutions and configuration systems, then it would take to simply just write our own solution -- with total control, all versatility required, easier flow, and far fewer places for bugs and attack vectors to arise.

So, I don't care about New Language X, or New Technology Y. I can learn the pieces of it as needed, but I just can't work up the exuberance for it.

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