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Comment Re:You made the bed. Now sleep in it. (Score 3, Informative) 253

The problem is that areas had record cold this past winter, and "deniers" get slammed for correlating a weather event to global climate change

Record cold can be evidence for global warming. The key is to understand what "warming" actually is: adding energy to the system. Consider a glass of water. What happens when you add energy to it by shaking it? The answer is, it sloshes around -- the maximum height of the water surface gets higher, and the minimum height gets lower. Or consider the refrigeration thermodynamic cycle: one part of the system gets colder even though the total energy of the system is increasing.

That's not to say that record cold is always evidence of global warming, or indeed that it could never be evidence of an oncoming ice age. I'm just pointing out that the issue is more complicated than "record cold = cooling" or "record heat = heating" considered in isolation. We only know that record heat actually is evidence for heating because it's been observed as part of a larger pattern and was predicted by climate models and such (i.e., all the actual science that climatologists do that a Fox News sound bite is inadequate to explain).

Comment Re:From where does the FAA get power to regulate i (Score 1) 40

Where does the FAA claim it gets the power to regulate drones which are only engaged in INTRA-state commerce and flying too low to interfere with interstate air traffic? Seems to me that's the state's job

From 49USC app 1301 - the Federal Aviation Act of 1958 ...

No, no, no. Not what I meant.

From where in the Constitution, in the face of the 10th Amendment and Norton v. Shelby County 118 U.S. 425 (1886), does the Federal Government's Congress claim to get the power to delegate to such an executive branch agency?

Comment From where does the FAA get power to regulate it? (Score 1) 40

I'm curious:

Where does the FAA claim it gets the power to regulate drones which are only engaged in INTRA-state commerce and flying too low to interfere with interstate air traffic? Seems to me that's the state's job.

(Similarly with the FCC and radio signals that are too weak to be decoded outside the state of origin or substantially interfere with reasonable interstate services. Sure "radio goes on forever". But so does sound - with the same inverse-square law and similar interference characteristics - and we get along just fine without federal regulation of speech and bullhorns.)

Comment Re:Interesting ... but not things I use much (Score 2, Interesting) 312

100% behind you. Did they add what I actually need ?
  • - readable fonts. The current font aliasing is horrible, horrible, horrible. Yes, they provide ways to tweak it, but it's useless gobshite. Even external tweakers can't seem to make them less fuzzy and more readable.
  • - a Win2K theme. WinXP if you want to go extra fancy (not me).
  • - a file explorer window without all the extra shit of 'anything goes' as virtual folders. And with proper indentation of trees, not just 2 pixels. And lines.
  • - actual buttons where there is something to press. Grey on grey without border doesn't fucking count. I have to click at random on your stupid shit of a user interface to figure out where the buttons are and where the comments are yah fucking cunts.
  • - a single button (or a single page) to disable all the spy stuff, instead of having to find 2 page-long list on forums and downloads utility progs to do it for me.
  • - give us an option to get rid of all the ribbons and replace them with old-style menus with accelerator keys, it saves a lot of vertical real estate and your icons look like shit. If I wanted to have stupid looking icons everywhere instead of plain text, I'd learn chinese (no offence to the chinese).

Yes, I hate it. All the good stuff has been replaced with wastes of time and ugly shit. If I hate it so much, why do I use it ? It's in a VM under Linux for the 3 windows programs I still need to use.

Comment Re:Still a proprietary, DRM'd piece of shit. (Score 1) 137

The only 'negative' things I can see about it are the Microsoft connection..and that it'll eventually RROD on me.

It's also violating your privacy (especially if instead of a 360 it were an Xbone, as this topic is actually about). By using it, you are also tacitly signalling your support for Microsoft's continuing assault on property rights (by attempting to subordinate them to copyright law run amok). Those costs may not be measured in dollars, yet they are real.

Comment Re:What took them so long? (Score 1) 126

Sure, but unless you've developed a superconducting substrate, or come up with a reliable, efficient 3D cooling system, or are willing to run the 3D transistors only at very low speed/power, you're going to run into serious heat dissipation problems.

Back then I was proposing a diamond semiconductor - supported and powered by water-cooled silver busbars. Diamond is extremely conductive thermally. The bandgap is 5.5V, corresponding to the deep ultraviolet, so you can run it very hot without fouling the electrical properties (though you have to keep; it below 752 F or it will gradually degrade.) I'd want to put it in a bottle with an inert atmosphere so it wouldn't oxidize at high temperature, either.

The flip side of the big bandgap is that it consumes more energy - and generates more heat - when switching than current silicon designs which run at about a third that voltage.

These days I'd probably go for layers of graphine, which conducts heat even better than diamond.

With a rectangular solid you can get a LOT of transistors (and their interconnects) into a few cubic feet. The original proposal was for a six-foot cube - 216 cubic feet. Powering and cooling on two faces gives you 72 square feet of heat and power transfer serice, with 432 square feet on the other two faces for optical I/O fibers. Nowadays I'd take a page from Gene Amdahl and go a tad smaller: so, like the 1960s-era cabinets for IBM compter components, the block of logic and its supporting structures would fit into a standard elevator.

Comment What took them so long? (Score 1) 126

The report adds that processors could still continue to fulfill Moore's Law with increased vertical density.

What took them so long?

I've been pointing out that a three-dimensional arrangement off components could continue FAR longer than an essentially single-layer arrangements since at least the 1970s.

Comment Models and simulations (Score 1) 504

I've long wondered why models and simulations aren't used a lot more in economic and political matters. They're used everywhere in physics and engineering, even when there are many unknowns (look at the Lorenz equation of climate models and how much it's improved since then). So why aren't modelisations with positive outcomes OBLIGATORY before voting some new laws that nobody really knows if it'll improve things or not ? Models may not be perfect but they provide a starting point and WILL be improved.

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