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Comment Re:Strange Logic (Score 1) 209

Manning wasn't pardoned. He had his sentence commuted. That means, in the view of the US government, she'd served enough of his sentence, not that the government agreed with what he did. This was after 7 years of imprisonment, during which time she was tortured. The US government can take the position that what Manning did was wrong, and something it wants to discourage, while still feeling that she had suffered enough.

Snowden hasn't been tried or convicted, and as a result the US government cannot reasonably say he's been "punished enough" without their position being that leaking state secrets isn't a crime that rises to the level of any punishment at all.

That's the logic behind pardoning Manning but not Snowden.

Comment Re:Price has other factors (Score 1) 89

I suspect that sentence was mangled between brain and keyboard, because a hallmark of cheap* phones is that they don't get updates, and the entire point of the sentence is to suggest that Android One devices are superior to regular cheap phones.

* Yeah, OK, let's be honest, almost all Android phones, cheap or not, don't get updated.

Comment Re:Best fucking part (Score 1) 748

So just to be clear, Britain and Sweden are organizing a very public extradition process so that the two nations can cooperate with a secret request by the US to (illegally, in both countries) kidnap Assange, transfer him to Saudi Arabia, and torture him there?

Why bother? Why not just let the US do the kidnapping on British soil?

Comment Re:Your move, Assange.... (Score 1) 748

I think everyone's missing the major loophole here. I'm not sure there even is an extradition request from the US for Assange, but even if there is one, the laws an Australian citizen can be prosecuted for regarding US secrets are dubious.

The actual extradition request that actually matters, the one the UK has agreed to, is to Sweden. Assange doesn't mention that one.

As you point out, it's not offer for a some future negotiation of a treaty. And as others have pointed out, "Clemency" somehow only meaning "pardoning" isn't Assange's escape route either. But it'd be interesting if he was extradited to the US, and then promptly extradited to Sweden.

Comment Re:False premise (Score 1) 482

Well, it hasn't happened yet. That said, why would you cancel your cable Internet for this? Yes, cellular Internet will be useful for your Chromebook when you're away from home, but in the same way it is today - a useful supplementary service that fills in the gaps, not as your primary system.

As for how you'd connect to a server at home, there are two options: VPN, or IPv6. The latter tends to get forgotten, but I connect to machines at home directly via IPv6 from my (T-Mobile) cellular connection without any problems. This sounds horrifying in terms of security, but if you imagine the development server being as locked down as a Chromebook or iDevice, without the back doors associated with too many modern IoT devices, it should be fine.

I'm more bothered about having to develop using a web interface, especially in an era in which leaving Firefox open for a day with 20 or so tabs open seems to result in it eating 4+Gb of memory, not the connectivity part. The connectivity part is actually the nice part.

Comment Re:False premise (Score 1) 482

Maybe...

I bought a consumer NAS a year or so ago, which is a collection of servers (software, from Samba to various video streaming DLNA type things) running over GNU/Linux, connected to a big hard drive. It's still a little bit of a nerds thing, but I can totally see people wanting to use things like this to ensure they have control over their own content.

And after I got a Chromebook, I started to wonder how far off we are having similar devices that host IDEs (don't laugh, there are quite a few web based IDEs out there, Eclipse has two such projects, though in my view they're not ready for prime time.) You could, in theory, use your Chromebook as-is in the future, with a third party, locked down, server that has an IDE on it, to develop Android apps. Hell (and I mean hell), if Google gets involved, that might become the recommended development environment.

Comment Re: This will never happen, even if I want it to. (Score 2) 272

Obama has only said he can't. He's never said why. Those claiming he said he can't because of legal reasons related to admissions of guilt or trials are lying (or unwittingly repeating lies) - he's never made any such assertion.

In all honesty, the reason he "can't" probably has to do with setting a precedent. Hopefully the same principle doesn't apply to commuting a sentence, and Obama can commute Manning's before he leaves office.

Comment Re:Whoah there (Score 1) 22

But in saying it this way, you're attempting to imply you can provide evidence. And I am simply pointing out that there is no reason to even consider that this is a possibility. Don't tell me you will do it later, because that's irrelevant. It's no different than saying nothing at all, or even saying "I have no evidence" or "I cannot provide evidence." They are all exactly equivalent in the end, except that the other methods do not have the implication that you might actually provide the evidence, despite you not giving us a reason to believe that, so it smacks of dishonesty.

Just say nothing at all, unless you have something to contribute. You'll be better off.

Comment Re:It's the media's fault (Score 1) 22

If not for you, then it's not difficult for anybody.

I make no claims about what is not hard for others. I do assert that most people do not do it, regardless of how hard it is.

In this case blaming the media is just doing the democrats' dirty work ...

Yawn. I am uninterested of your characterizations. Either actually make an argument against what I wrote, or do not. So far, you have not.

We all have the same power to turn our backs. You're not that special.

You are not, in any way, arguing against what I wrote.

In theory humans can make the choice.

Of course they can. So? Again: this, in no way whatsoever, implies that the media is not to blame. It just means that we have the power to ignore their bad behavior. But it's still their bad behavior. They are still to blame for it. Obviously.

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