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Submission + - U of Calif. San Diego chancellor is a director of outsoucer hired by UCSF (computerworld.com)

dcblogs writes: The offshore outsourcing planned at the University of California's San Francisco (UCSF) campus is following a standard playbook. The affected employees expect to train their replacements as a condition of severance. Their jobs will soon be in India and they'll be out of work. But the chancellor of the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), Pradeep K. Khosla, may still be getting compensated by HCL Infosystems. It is one of the units of India-based HCL, the IT services contractor hired by the university. Khosla is an independent and non-executive director on the HCL Infosystems board of directors. Khosla has reported his HCL compensation to the university at $12,000 last year for 56 hours of total time served. He also earns $12,000 from Infosys Science Foundation as chair of the engineering and computer science jury, according to the compensation report. When asked if the university's contract with HCL creates a conflict for Khosla, a UCSD spokeswoman,replied: "The contract was negotiated between UCSF and HCL; it did not involve Chancellor Pradeep Khosla in any way, nor was it discussed at any HCL meeting that Chancellor Khosla attended." But the HCL contract can be leveraged by any UC campus. The "HCL agreement is UC-wide," according to notes from the university's system-wide Architecture Committee. "Other CIOs looking at UCSF experience before other folks dip in. Wait for a year before jumping in with HCL." Another issue for the university may be having an association generally with the offshore outsourcing industry, which works at displacing U.S. IT workers, including computer science grads of institutions such as the University of California.

Submission + - Ask Slashtot: How to determine if your IOT device is part of a botnet? 1

galgon writes: There has been a number of stories of IoT devices becoming part of
Botnets and being used in DDOS Attacks. If these devices are seemingly working correctly to the user how would they ever know the device was compromised? Is there anything the average user can do to detect when they have a misbehaving device on their network?

Submission + - FBI Agent Posing As Journalist To Deliver Malware To Suspect Was Fine, Says DOJ (vice.com)

An anonymous reader writes: In 2007, an FBI agent impersonated an Associated Press journalist in order to deliver malware to a criminal suspect and find out his location. According to a newly published report from the Department of Justice, the operation was in line with the FBI's undercover policies at the time. Journalistic organizations had expressed concern that the tactic could undermine reporters’ and media institutions’ credibility. The case concerned a Seattle teenager suspected of sending bomb threats against a local school. FBI Special Agent Mason Grant got in touch with the teen over email, pretending to be an AP journalist. After some back and forth, Grant sent the suspect a fake article which, when clicked, grabbed his real IP address. Armed with this information, the FBI identified and arrested the suspect. The Associated Press, the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, and other journalistic organizations condemned the move. They pointed out that an FBI agent posing as a reporter could create distrust between legitimate journalists and sources, and also raised issues with the way the malware was distributed through a fake news story. The new Department of Justice report noted that, today, this activity would require greater authorization, under an interim policy on impersonating members of the media that was adopted by the FBI this June. Now, for the agency to pretend to be a journalist as part of an undercover operation, an application must be made by the head of an FBI field office to the agency's main headquarters, reviewed by the Undercover Review Committee, and then approved by the deputy director, after discussion with the deputy attorney general.

Submission + - Ford moving all production of small cars from U.S. to Mexico (usatoday.com)

FlyHelicopters writes: More jobs continue to leave the country, now Ford has quietly announced to investors that all small car production is moving to Mexico... Can SUVs and Pickup Trucks be far behind? For now, those will stay, but like the frog in boiling water, they are moving it slowly a bit at a time so people don't notice, right up until Ford becomes a foreign car company while no one was watching...

Submission + - Ubuntu torrent removed from Google due to DMCA complaint (omgubuntu.co.uk)

LichtSpektren writes: OMG Ubuntu reports: "Cited in a DMCA takedown request filed against Google on behalf of Paramount Pictures, and spotted by TorrentFreak (and tipped to us by reader ~nonanonymous) is an innocuous link to a 32-bit alternate install image Ubuntu 12.04.2 LTS. The takedown request seeks to remove links to a number of torrent URLS that are alleged to infringe on Paramount movie 'Transformers: Age of Extinction'. Ubuntu clearly doesn’t. All it takes is a quick glance at the URL in question to see that. It’s very much a stock iso of an old Ubuntu release. And yet Google has complied with the request and scrubbed the link to the page in question from its search index."

Submission + - Slashdot Serving up redirect ads on android (slashdot.org) 1

An anonymous reader writes: As many of you may not know, because of AdBlock, slashdot.org has ads to fund their website and continue to provide a "free" service. But lately the ads shown have been redirecting users to malware sights and displaying suspicious popovers. In the recent year the type and form of ads has also gotten more annoying. They have bottom page ads for useless aps and fixed frame ads at the bottom of the screen. All these issues bring the question, is the content on Slashdot really worth the trouble? This user thinks not. Goodbye.

Submission + - NVidia GeForce now requires mandatory registration (pcworld.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: With the newly released GeForce Experience 3.0 software, Nvidia might irk some users. While you will still be able to download the drivers from their web site sans registration, you will now be required to register in order to use the GeForce Experience software http://www.pcworld.com/article... While the Experience software does add some powerful streaming features for games and is "three times faster and consumes 50 percent less memory than the old GeForce Experience", it might seem like a bit of overkill for those users that only used the software to keep their drivers up to date.

Submission + - Scientists named a parasite after Obama (washingtonpost.com)

turkeydance writes: Other presidents have mountains named after them. They're the namesakes for high schools, boulevards, space centers, libraries, airports, and elk. George Washington has the capital of our country named for him, for crying out loud.

But how many of them have the dubious honor of being the namesake for a parasitic worm?

World, meet Baracktrema obamai, a deadly turtle pathogen named in honor of our current president. Believe it or not, it's supposed to be a compliment.

Submission + - General Motors Recalls 4.3 Million Vehicles Over A Software Bug (gizmodo.com)

An anonymous reader writes: If you own a GM vehicle from 2014-2017, listen up: General Motors is recalling nearly 4.3 million vehicles worldwide after discovering a software defect that prevents air bags from deploying during a crash. The software bug may also prevent the seat belts from locking properly. The flaw has already been linked to one death and three injuries. Vehicles affected by the recall include 2014-2016 car models of the Buick LaCross, Chevy SS, and Chevy Spark EVs. It also includes 2014-2017 models of the Buick Encore, GMC Sierra, Chevy Corvette, Chevy Trax, Chevy Caprice, Chevy Silverado. Additionally, the recall affects 2015-2017 models of the Chevy Tahoe, Chevy Silverado HD, Chevy Suburban, GMC Yukon, GMC Yukon XL, GMC Sierra HD, Cadillac Escalade, and Cadillac Escalade ESV. GM will notify owners of affected vehicles and update the software for free, according to the NHTSA.

Submission + - Slashdot ads compromised (imgur.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The Slashdot ad network is potentially spreading malware through malicious redirects as part of what's at the very least a phishing campaign and at worst a drive-by malware delivery network.

This was reproduced on a fresh, fully patched device.

Submission + - New species "Baracktrema obamai" named by President Obama's distant cousin (latimes.com)

tomhath writes: B. obamai is a flatworm that infects black marsh turtles and southeast Asian box turtles in Malaysia. Scientists study turtle parasites because they are believed to be the ancestors of the flatworms that cause schistosomiasis, a disease that kills between 20,000 and 200,000 people each year, according to the World Health Organization.

Submission + - San Francisco fights the stink of piss in elevators with bacteria-eating enzymes

AmiMoJo writes: The Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) system is taking aim at its number one problem — with a new strategy designed to contain the puddles of urine and eliminate lingering pee smells inside its elevators. The overhaul will include testing a prototype odor-eating spray called the "Urine-B-Gone System" currently installed in the elevator at Civic Center Station. The lavender scented, enzyme-based spray is misted hourly into the shaft from a grid of automated puffers. But does something that sounds like an industrial-scale air freshener actually stand a chance against BART’s intractable funk?

Submission + - World's First IC Microcomputer Found (timeslive.co.za)

Tokolosh writes: It’s not often that a YouTube video on a technical topic gives one goosebumps. And it’s not often that someone unpacking a computer makes history.

Francois Rautenbach a computer hardware and software engineer from South Africa achieves both with a series of videos he has quietly posted on YouTube.

It shows the “unboxing” of a batch of computer modules that had been found in a pile of scrap metal 40 years ago and kept in storage ever since. Painstaking gathering of a wide range of evidence from documents to archived films had convinced Rautenbach he had tracked down the very first Guidance and Navigation Control computer used on a test flight of the Saturn 1B rocket and the Apollo Command and Service Modules.

Apollo-Saturn 202 or Flight AS-202 as it was officially called was the first to use an onboard computer – the same model that would eventually take Apollo 11 to the moon. Rautenbach argues that the computer on AS-202 was also the world’s first microcomputer. That title has been claimed for several computers made in later years from the Datapoint 2200 built by CTC in 1970 to the Altair 8800 designed in 1974.

The AS-202 flight computer goes back to the middle of the previous decade.

Submission + - slashdot dns problems? 1

An anonymous reader writes: I'm currently getting 'server not found' when clicking links on the main page, e.g. hardware.slashdot.org

Submission + - September 19th SpaceX Launch will be visible across California, Nevada. (reddit.com)

Bruce Perens writes: The nighttime launch of a SpaceX Falcon 9 containing Iridium satellites at 9:49 PM PST Monday September 19th from Vandenberg AFB SLC-4 is likely to be visible across California and in some Nevada locations. Although Vandenberg has a landing pad for the Falcon under construction, this will probably be a drone-ship landing and some California observers might see two of the landing burns.

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