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Submission + - Microsoft Posts 'No Boys Allowed' Signs at State of RI High School CS Event 3

theodp writes: "Girls and women are half of the world's population," Rhode Island Governor Gina Raimondo told hundreds of high school girls gathered behind doors with signs that read "[Microsoft] DigiGirlz: No Boys Allowed". "They are half of the world’s brains, problem-solvers, leaders. This world cannot solve problems unless they are at the table. That’s why I started programs like CS4RI, partnering with Microsoft and other leaders [including Microsoft-backed Code.org] to offer computer science in every Rhode Island school." Raimondo also noted she was dismayed to learn that only 12 of Rhode Island's 42 students who took the AP Computer Science test were girls (RI has 43,000+ enrolled HS students). The best way to make girls feel welcome in K-12 CS education, some influence-wielding tech giants, politicians, and educators seem to agree, is by making boys even more unwelcome via things like gender-based federal K-12 CS education funding; girls-only learn-to-code initiatives, STEM schools and summer computer camps; and gender-weighted teacher incentive programs from Google and tech-backed Code.org (Google and the U.S. Government even sought to exclude boys from programming White House Christmas tree lights in 2014).

Comment Re:If I had my way... (Score 2) 184

I'd seriously like to see the courts side with consumers and insist Lexmar must refill the cartridge for free as long as I own the printer. Let's see how fast the printer companies back off from their outrageous claims.

All of the printer companies have a history of abusing the legal system. Lexmar just happens to the worse offender.

Comment Re:Poor business (Score 4, Insightful) 372

One guys "crap" is another guys entertainment.

The problem is that any given reviewer wont "mesh" with what *YOU* like. Or what *I* like. In the dark ages (before www), I used to religiously read two or three movie reviewers in my area. After 5 or 6 reviews the lights clicked. If X liked a given movie it would be likely that I WOULDN'T like it. If Y liked a movie, then it was pretty good odds that I would enjoy it. It was a bit more complicated than that but that's the gist. I learned what THEIR criteria was pretty quick.

Occasionally, I'd see a crappy movie my "rules" would indicate I would enjoy it or vise versa but it was otherwise pretty accurate.

Good example of an exception -- Back to the Beach (1980s reunion movie). I did *NOT* want to see that film. Some friends and I went to see the latest Bond film (can't recall what it was) but it was sold out. They decided to see this and I didn't drive. Everything told me that this movie would be crap. I'm embarrassed to say I enjoyed it. The opening on the airliner set the tone and it was just fun to watch. My "rules" told me to avoid this film like the plague.

Submission + - Why You Should Care About The Supreme Court Case On Toner Cartridges (consumerist.com)

rmdingler writes: A corporate squabble over printer toner cartridges doesn’t sound particularly glamorous, and the phrase “patent exhaustion” is probably already causing your eyes to glaze over. However, these otherwise boring topics are the crux of a Supreme Court case that will answer a question with far-reaching impact for all consumers: Can a company that sold you something use its patent on that product to control how you choose to use after you buy it?

Here’s the background: Lexmark makes printers. Printers need toner in order to print, and Lexmark also happens to sell toner.

Then there’s Impression Products, a third-party company makes and refills toner cartridges for use in printers, including Lexmark’s.

Comment Re:Conflict of interest (Score 1) 243

So basically all the money the government has collected as fines and penalties is distributed evenly to all taxpayers. That money was collected as compensation for crimes against society, and this way it gets distributed back to society.

Even your seventh-grade Social Studies teacher wouldn't buy that as having any chance of happening. An empiricist would say that you're being farmed for tax money to be distributed to political cronies for favor and power and that this recalibration is a response to simmering unrest which is building due to the abuse.

They have the right idea in Britain - there they climb the pole, throw an old tire around the red light camera, fill it full of diesel fuel, and light it up. At least some of their citizens realize that red light cameras haven't really ever been about safety, except on the overt marketing literature.

Comment Re:Two things: (Score 1) 225

Hilary's thug wranglers told them to do that when they were hired

Impossible. Every body knows Trumps Russian assassins killed all of Hillery's thug wranglers right after they killed those three million Mass. residents that illegally voted in New Hampshire. That was Putin's "congratulations" present to all the Trumpanzees.

Now, for a serious question; Is there anyone at all that really thinks this? Because wow man, you dudes are supposed to be way too unhip to trip.

Please come back to Planet Consensus reality, your family misses you.

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