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Comment Re:Look a bit higher (Score 1) 251

"Plain sight," as in "you don't need tools to get to it." The sort of thing any FAA inspector could simply walk over and easily see/get to.

Otherwise, semantics. You can't fly your over 9-ounce toy, at all, unless it bears your registration information. The uniqueness of the registration between someone's multiple toys is neither here nor there. It's "you can't fly your toy without federal involvement and a way to track the toy back to you via a publicly searchable database." That's what matters.

Comment Re:It's already known (Score 1) 251

The FAA has statutory authority over every bit of US (and territorial) air space from 1mm above the ground. They are exactly who defines who can fly where. That has nothing to do with things like privacy laws - that's about what you do with, for example, images taken while flying. Right now, that's a patchwork of local and state laws. But who (and what) can fly where and how high: that's FAA turf, entirely.

Comment Re:Look a bit higher (Score 1) 251

The over .55, under 55 pound RC aircraft must carry a registration number in plain site. If you own four of them, all four must carry that number. If you operate under part 107, all of your RC devices need their own unique registration codes. These aren't "guidelines," these are rules now formally in place with serious consequences should you blow them off.

Comment Re:Easy answer to the federal question (Score 2) 251

The answer to the federal question is easy. Get a few of these drones flying over the White House and see if anybody complains. Done.

The FAA has already designated a 30-mile-wide circle around the White House as a No Fly Zone - with serious penalties if you operate there. Bad example. You are not "done."

Comment Re:It's already known (Score 0) 251

Funny how you're asserting such specific details (anonymously) without something as simple as a link to this incredibly well established law. It doesn't exist. You're making it up. You're lying. And you know it, which is why you cannot cite even a general bit of guidance from the FAA (let alone a specific federal rule or piece of legislation) that to back up your hand-wavy assertion. Here's what we know: the FAA requires (without specific waiver) that operators stay UNDER 400'. The agency goes to great length to spell out dozens of specific rules that apply to newly certificed (part 107) commercial operators, and of course the rules for recreational operators are quite a bit looser. At no point, anywhere, does the FAA indicate the altitude below which you "own" the airspace around private property.

That doesn't mean operators should be jerks. But we know you're being one.

Comment Re: Rule of thumb (Score 1) 251

There are places for people to fly drones. A neighbor's property isn't one of them.

Why? What if the neighbor not only permits it, but encourages it? What if the neighbor has asked you to photograph her gutters or her chimney before she calls a roofing guy to come out and climb up for a look? What business is it of yours if your neighbor is just fine with it? Perhaps your neighbor doesn't think you should be allowed to go use your lawn mower to cut some OTHER person's lawn. Should they be able to stop you? No? I see.

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