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Comment Re:What's the big problem? (Score 1) 468

Hyperbole or not, it appears to offer nothing but hassle to end users, which probably means it's getting unpopular.

Virtually all US credit cards are chip and signature, offering little in improved security. It's slow. Most card readers have a slot but haven't had that feature activated (honestly, the only store around here that allows chip vs swipe is Wal-Mart. Publix, as one major example, doesn't) leading to confusion. The card readers themselves seem to be bug ridden, with some freaking out if you don't insert the card at the exact moment they expect it. Wal-Mart's even, until recently, made a noise like a submarine klaxon when the payment was accepted - someone and completely unnecessarily embarrassing.

Add to that the delays, and you have the least popular technology since GMX.

Comment Terminology (Score 4, Insightful) 67

Can anyone explain why we continue to use the term "ride sharing" when Uber, Lyft, et al, have nothing to do with ride sharing? They're basic car-for-hire services. Ride sharing has always been used to mean "People who share a car to get to a common destination" (eg commuters who work together and live close by saving on gas, that kind of thing), and while Uber started by claiming that this was essentially what they were doing, it became obvious pretty quickly that the service resembles ride sharing in no way whatsoever.

Comment Re:I am with Snowden 100% (Score 1) 155

I agree with most of what you say - though hard evidence is not a bad thing, there was a lot of "He said, she said" stuff before the leak proved the DNC was rotten on this issue - but the Turkey data dump was not a Wikileaks thing, despite early reporting suggesting it was. Snowden's almost certainly talking about the release of private information - credit card numbers, private phone numbers and home addresses of donors - that was also in the leak.

Comment Re:Basic Journalism... (Score 2) 155

What modern-day journalist working for anything resembling a respectable newspaper has published the credit card numbers, home addresses, and private phone numbers of their subjects?

Snowden didn't state specifics, but the scandal around Wikileaks release of the DNC emails has generally focused on two things - the possibility it came from Russia (nothing to do with Wikileaks themselves or editing, so unlikely to have been Snowden's concern), and that it included private information about individual - often blameless - people that could cause them serious harm without having anything to do with holding them to account.

Everyone, to the best of my knowledge, is on board with the idea of Wikileaks leaking an email that says "Hi, DWS here! I need a list of ways in which we can secretly handicap Sander's campaign, but remember guys, technically this is illegal so mum's the word!". Fuck DWS. If she goes to prison over this, then nobody's shedding any tears beyond a few die hard Clinton worshipers.

What we're not on board with is "Oh, Jeff Atl called to donate $100 to the general election fund. Could you handle it? His credit card number is 4111 0291 3839 1212, expires 06/17, CVV 971. Address if you need it is 9821 SE Sunflower Rd, Trenton Gardens, NJ 19281." Even if the full email continues "I let him know that with his donation comes a 30 minute meeting with the Secretary of the Environment so he can deal with that little problem his factory is having with the inspectors", we'd at least expect the credit card details and street part of the address redacted.

Comment Re:A no-brainer... (Score 1) 480

It's not more secure than Windows 7. How can it be more secure if it leaks your information, without your knowledge, to a third party, AND if the software update mechanism is so user hostile (unrequested reboots, machine slowing to a crawl at random times) that the only workaround is to disable updates completely, either at the firewall or via hacks?

I like a lot about Windows 10, but it's less secure, more resource intensive, and less responsive. I'm keeping Windows 7 machines around in my home for a reason.

Comment Re:Naturally they'll investigate to help HRC. (Score 1) 157

They're not prosecuting, they're investigating. And in terms of them being treated equally - they did investigate HRC, but found there wasn't enough wrongdoing to make it worth prosecuting.

And... it's unlikely the FBI will prosecute any of the hackers, albeit this time because the hackers are likely not within any US court's jurisdiction.


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Comment Re:Amazon fire is more locked down (Score 1) 108

Which is IMHO actually a great selling point of the Fire line, they are the best devices for young children going, especially as they now sport a microSD slot so you can load them up with video content.

I'd just go for Kodi to my NAS... which is what I actually do. Runs great on the Fire TV Stick so far. AFAICT the Fire TV stick is the cheapest reliable platform for Kodi which comes with a halfway decent remote, and I do mean it's only about halfway decent. Still, it has enough buttons to drive the interface.

Comment Re:Why encourage them? (Score 1) 181

why is anyone entitled to anything others produce?

Why are you entitled to go on breathing if you have something I want and you're standing in my way? What makes you think you have the right to life, liberty, or personal property?

because I do. you can personally try and take any of those from me, but you will pay with your life.

You are such a trite and tedious brand of moron. First, let's just say you're right, and I can't possibly take any of those from you even those I have a scoped rifle in a high power caliber. (This is explicitly not a threat; we are discussing capabilities. I have no intention of killing anyone for any reason. ObDisclaimerWhee!) I and a few of my buddies clearly could do so.

which is why you cowards group together and have government do all your dirty work for you and think it's ok, "because democracy".

That's not how it works at all. In practice, you really can not keep any of your stuff without the system of law, or some other system of law. You would be forced to group up (like a coward, apparently) with other people who have stuff in order to protect all your stuff, both because you have to sleep sometime and because you are not invulnerable even when awake, whatever your personal Rambo fantasies might look like. And that's why others are entitled to a share of what "you" earn; they're helping you keep it.

If you don't like the entitlement argument, you can consider this alternative one, which I also consider to be valid: If you don't share your wealth with them, they will share their poverty with you. People with nothing to lose have no motivation not to take your stuff. You can help them better themselves, you can give them stuff, or you can watch them take everything you have because they have no other recourse and they have every bit as much right to life as you do. What's right doesn't even enter into it. This is basic biology. It's how the world works. You can put your hands over your ears and shout right up until the world shows up at your doorstep and eats your fingers.

we are a nation of laws,

HA HA HA HA HA

and Apple is doing nothing illegal or immoral.

Apple may or may not be doing anything illegal, but what they are doing is certainly immoral. Even if you don't care about the moral aspect, it's also unsustainable.

no one is obligated to pay the maximum taxes possible. avoidance is not the same as evasion.

And legality has never equaled morality.

Comment Re:it's amazing what you can accomplish (Score 2) 47

That is because Burning Man treats the land like it is theirs and theirs alone.

It's a fucking desert. One does need to clean up, but they have cleanup crews for that. That's where most of the non-permit money apparently goes.

Now it's just a way for 20-30 somethings to burn through mad amounts of cash, all while feeling like they're somehow counter cultural.

When was it anything else? The ratio of cool shit on fire to people just getting wasted may have changed. But I know many longtime burners. They went for entertainment, not to make a statement. Some of them have deluded themselves since about it, but it's bullshit.

When the event is over the land looks and smells like human waste and takes an insane amount of resources to reclaim, clean, and restore it to some remote resemblance of what state it use to be in.

Which helps explain why payroll is the single largest expenditure at burning man.

Comment Re:Time IS on Apple's Side (Score 1) 108

Actors are on the way out because of course as computers increase in capability so virtual acting bots become possible and they live forever

I was with you until you took a left turn into sheer fantasy. The most compelling stories are about humans (or analogies), after all, so I have a hard time believing we'll be discarding the human element entirely from story-driven entertainment.

Actually, I think he's right. I don't think they'll go away completely; it's really cheap to make a movie which mostly consists of some people doing mundane things. You can shoot on location (getting easier and easier as gear gets smaller) so you don't have to build sets. Your only big cost is talent. On the other hand, I think we'll see action movies without real humans in them eventually.

I also think we'll see more and more video games, and they will have digital actors. More and more of the public plays games now, and every time I watch an action movie any more I think "this would be better as a video game." Er, granted it was any good to begin with, but most of them would make great FPSes.

Comment Re:it's amazing what you can accomplish (Score 1) 47

It seems to me like this is what deserts are for. We should be trying to reclaim as much of them as possible, but we ought to use them while we have them.

Which reminds me... Not that I've ever gone or will go, but it's tragic what burning man has to pay for permits now, especially when it takes place on land that supposedly belongs to all of us.

Comment Re:pivoting (Score 1) 160

No, I don't know. What difference does that make?

It's not your mom and pop computer store up the road, where if it folds a couple of people lose their jobs. It's Microsoft, and when they lay a bunch of people off they're changing course and it affects the whole industry. It can have negative downstream effects as businesses who have [foolishly] depended on them have to change their course, as well.

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