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Comment Re:massive parallel processing=limited application (Score 1) 108

Also, there is caching, and also, some loads are heavy on longish FPU operations.

So... it doesn't quite work out that way. Also, multicore designs can have separate memory.

One example of multicore design that's both interesting and functional are the various vector processor graphics cores. Lots of em in there; and they get to do a lot of useful work you couldn't really do any other way with similar clock speeds and process tech.

Comment Re:Solution: Buy legislators. All of them. (Score 1) 188

You cherry pick the bad ones.

Well, I cherry picked the high end devices, yes -- because they were sold claiming the feature sets that were compelling. Now, the fact that those feature sets were incomplete, and/or buggy, and/or mischaracterized... that's something I didn't pick. But it's been very consistent, and the higher end the device, the more consistent it's been.

It just sounds like you do business with shitty companies.

Well, Canon for the camera. Marantz for the pre-pro. Kenwood for the radio. I totally agree they are shitty companies. And they won't be getting any more of my money. It's not like I can't learn.

The bottom line is, these devices have, and were sold trumpeting, the mechanisms that would allow them to be fixed and/or improved. They aren't fixed, and they surely aren't improved in any significant way. I'm just reporting it, and drawing a general (and accurate) conclusion about considering "network upgradable" to be anything more than marketing hype.

You don't like what I'm saying, okay, more power to you. I'm still saying it, though. And I'm still right, so there's that. :)

Comment Re:Who would have guessed? (Score 4, Interesting) 251

Government procurement contracts pretty much preclude the government obtaining goods and services on the open market. Instead it must rely to a large degree on contractors and vendors who have the capability of handling all the special paperwork and requirements.

So if you're on a procurement committee you don't have much choice. Once you discard the vendors who (a) can't absorb the amount of money to be spent on schedule and (b) jump through the statutory federal contractor hoops, what you're left with is a rogues gallery of usual suspects.

Comment Re:How dare they hack NY Times reporters! (Score -1, Troll) 61

So...it's NSA's fault when foreign intelligence services conduct espionage against US political parties, media organizations, etc., and actively try to influence the outcomes of US elections, and manipulate the opinions of US citizens? You realize that no matter who wins in November, possibly millions of Americans will believe the election was stolen or rigged, and possibly by foreign influence?

I know, I know -- in this crowd, the US is the enemy, here, and we don't actually need to have any kind of foreign intelligence capability; NSA's sole purpose for being is to figure out ways to illegally spy on Americans so it can solidify the power base of shadowy elites. Or something. Whenever I need to be reminded of just how out of touch many people are with history, reality, or both, I read Slashdot comments.

Comment Solution: Buy legislators. All of them. (Score 5, Interesting) 188

Captain Obvious Competition.

Yep.

These companies already have your money, so updating a device that's already been sold is a needless expense. There's also a good argument to be made that updating a device hurts future sales. If your phone isn't updated, it will start to feel old, so you're more likely to buy a new phone sooner.

Yes. I have a high-end preamp-processor, updatable over the net. Plenty of bugs. Did they ever fix them, much less add new features? No. Did they release a new model? Yes. I have a high-end camera. Updatable over the net. Plenty of bugs. Did they ever fix them, much less add new features? No. Did they release a new model? Yes. I have a high-end radio transceiver. Updatable over the net. Plenty of bugs. Did they ever fix them, much less add new features? No. Did they release a new model? Yes. And so on.

The whole "we can update your device" bit is a scam (and often, so is the "we can update your software" bit.) The only way a corporation is likely to actually update hardware responsibly is if legislation forces them to. And good luck trying to get THAT in place when corporations outright buy the decisions of the legislatures.

Comment Simple answer: (Score 1) 188

Charge for the non-security feature updates -- maybe even do it through the app store. Customers have to pay for updates one way or the other, so you should be able to sell a competitively priced phone and then make just as much money selling fewer physical phones and more software updates as you would under the status quo. That'd be good for the environment too.

The one sticking point is, as always, the carriers. They'd much rather you trade in your perfectly good phone for another one whose price is rolled into a contract extension. I'm convinced that Verizon on several occasions deliberately botched upgrades to force you to buy a new phone with more RAM.

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