Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Compare cell phone plans using Wirefly's innovative plan comparison tool ×

Submission + - Google's AlphaGo beats Lee Se-dol in the first match (theverge.com) 1

Fref writes: Quote "The Verge": "A huge milestone has just been reached in the field of artificial intelligence: AlphaGo, the program developed by Google's DeepMind unit, has defeated legendary Go player Lee Se-dol in the first of five historic matches being held in Seoul, South Korea. Lee resigned after about three and a half hours, with 28 minutes and 28 seconds remaining on his clock. "
Lee will face off against AlphaGo again tomorrow and on Saturday, Sunday, and Tuesday

Submission + - Gravitational waves detected: Einstein was (again) right! (theguardian.com)

onestep42 writes: Albert Einstein finalized the General relativity theory nearly a century ago and it has never been defeated by experimental results.

One of the big man prediction was that events involving massive gravitational objects like a collision of neutron stars, a blackholes swallowing a neighbouring star or even a supernova, would shake the very ground of space-time continuum itself. These ripples would be named Gravitational Waves.

Those vibrations would be so strong that they would distort space-time on very large distances, propagating at the speed of light. Those Gravitational waves were detected by the Ligo / Virgo experimental collaboration, that were running for decades to prove their existence.

The basic concept is to measure the length of two long tunnels with lasers. Those tunnels are in T shape, orthogonally placed, so that if one is affected by a wave, the other one would be either not touched or with a different magnitude. If light takes more or less time than usual to travel along one of the tunnel, the length of it varied, because of Gravitational wave effect.

Those research not only confirm the waves existence themselves, but also open a new field of gravitational wave observation (beyond electromagnetic waves usually used). Also, the recorded event itself is probably proving that two blackholes merged together, creating those waves, adding to the discovery itself.

Nobel prizes at the horizon...

Submission + - What it will mean if LIGO detects gravitational waves

StartsWithABang writes: When we look out into the Universe, we normally gain information about it by gathering light of various wavelengths. However, there are other possibilities for astronomy, including by looking for the neutrinos emitted by astrophysical sources — first detected in the supernova explosion of 1987 — and in the gravitational waves emitted by accelerating masses. These ripples in the fabric of space were theorized back in the early days of Einstein’s General Relativity, and experiments to detect them have been ongoing since the 1960s. However, in September of 2015, Advanced LIGO came online, and it was the first gravitational wave observatory that was expected to detect a real gravitational wave signal. The press conference on Thursday is where the collaboration will make their official announcement, and in the meantime, here’s an explainer of what gravitational waves are, what Advanced LIGO can teach us, and how.

Submission + - Bjarne Stroustrup announces the C++ Core Guidelines

alphabetsoup writes: At CppCon this year, Bjarne Stroustrup announced the C++ Core Guidelines. The guidelines are designed to help programmers write safe-by-default C++ with no run-time overhead. Compilers will statically check the code to ensure no violations. A library is available now, with a static checking tool to follow in October.

Here is the video of the talk, and here are the slides.The guidelines themselves are here.

Submission + - New Zealand ISP's anti-geoblocking service makes waves (computerworld.com.au) 1

angry tapir writes: New Zealanders and Australians are often blocked from using cheap streaming services such as Netflix and Hulu and instead at the mercy of local content monopolies for popular shows such as Game of Thrones. However a New Zealand ISP Slingshot has caused a stir by making a previously opt-in service called 'Global Mode' a default for its customers. The new service means that people in NZ don't need to bother with VPNs or setting up proxies if they want to sign up to Netflix — they can just visit the site. The service has also caused a stir in Australia where the high price for digital goods, such as movies from the iTunes store, is a constant source of irritation for consumers
Windows

Submission + - NVIDIA entering mainstream CPU race with ARM (pcper.com)

Vigile writes: For many years NVIDIA has been rumored to enter the highly competitive general processor markets and while the speculation of x86 never actually panned out, at CES yesterday NVIDIA did something nearly as dramatic. Shortly before the Microsoft announcement of a Windows operating system running on the ARM architecture, NVIDIA CEO Jen-Hsun Huang went on stage and discussed Project Denver, the NVIDIA initiative to create high performance ARM processors suitable for desktop and server use at standard wattage and TDPs. This indicates a fundamental shift in computing technology where companies like NVIDIA can compete with Intel without the often-litigated x86 licenses.
Microsoft

Next Generation of Windows To Run On ARM Chip 307

Hugh Pickens writes "Sharon Chan reports in the Seattle Times that at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Microsoft showed the next generation of Windows running natively on an ARM chip design, commonly used in the mobile computing world, indicating a schism with Intel, the chip maker Microsoft has worked with closely with throughout the history of Windows and the PC. The Microsoft demonstration showed Word, PowerPoint and high definition video running on a prototype ARM chipset made by Texas Instruments, Nvidia. 'It's part of our plans for the next generation of Windows,' says Steve Sinofsky, president of Windows division. 'That's all under the hood.' According to a report in the WSJ, the long-running alliance between Microsoft and Intel is coming to a day of reckoning as sales of tablets, smartphones and televisions using rival technologies take off, pushing the two technology giants to go their separate ways. The rise of smartphones and more recently, tablets, has strained the relationship as Intel's chips haven't been able to match the low power consumption of chips based on designs licensed from ARM. Intel has also thumbed its nose at Microsoft by collaborating with Microsoft archrival Google on the Chrome OS, Google's operating system that will compete with Windows in the netbook computer market. 'I think it's a deep fracture,' says venture capitalist Jean-Louis Gassee regarding relations between Microsoft and Intel."
Microsoft

Submission + - Microsoft Multitouch Mouse - stroke your mouse? (i-programmer.info)

mikejuk writes: Multitouch is great — as long as you have an input device that supports it. For the desktop machine this is something of a problem. Not many have multitouch enabled monitors and the ones that do aren't exactly natural to use in a vertical mode. Multitouch works best on mobile devices that you tend to hold horizontally. Now Microsoft thinks it has the answer in the form a new mouse — Touch Mouse, that supports gestures. This mouse has a capacitive touch sensor on its back bring new meaning to "now stroke your mouse".
Graphics

Submission + - NVIDIA Unveils Denver ARM-Based CPU For HPC (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: In a jam-packed meeting room in Las Vegas today, NVIDIA CEO Jen-Hsun Huang spoke about the massive influx of mobile computing devices over the last few years and NVIDIA’s plans to better infiltrate the burgeoning market moving forward. During the address, Mr. Huang spoke almost about the company’s Tegra 2 processor and its capabilities, although he also dropped a bombshell to close his talk about NVIDIA’s “Project Denver.” Denver is not an x86 device, but rather a custom designed, high-performance ARM core that will target the HPC space. Though low-power ARM architecture hasn’t been geared for the HPC space, instead finding its way into a myriad of mobile devices and smartphones, NVIDIA aims to change that by pairing a custom core with their high performance GPU on a single SoC. NVIDIA's Denver chip is in a good position potentially if the company can execute, especially in light of Microsoft’s announcement earlier today that the next version of Windows will support next-gen System on a Chip (SoC) architectures from Intel, AMD, and ARM.
Microsoft

Submission + - Next Generation of Windows to Run on ARM Chip

Hugh Pickens writes: "Sharon Chan reports in the Seattle Times that at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Microsoft showed the next generation of Windows running natively on an ARM chip design, commonly used in the mobile computing world, indicating a schism with Intel, the chip maker Microsoft has worked with closely with throughout the history of Windows and the PC. The Microsoft demonstration showed Word, PowerPoint and high definition video running on a prototype ARM chipset made by Texas Instruments, Nvidia. "It's part of our plans for the next generation of Windows.," says Steve Sinofsky, president of Windows division. "That's all under the hood." According to a report in the WSJ, the long-running alliance between Microsoft and Intel is coming to a day of reckoning as sales of tablets, smartphones and televisions using rival technologies take off, pushing the two technology giants to go their separate ways. The rise of smartphones and more recently, tablets has strained the relationship as Intel's chips haven't been able to match the low-power consumption of chips based on designs licensed from ARM and Intel has also thumbed its nose at Microsoft by collaborating with Microsoft archrival Google on the Chrome OS, Google's operating system that will compete with Windows in the netbook computer market. "I think it's a deep fracture," says venture capitalist Jean-Louis Gassee regarding relations between Microsoft and Intel."
Science

Submission + - Hari Seldon is starting to look less fictional (physorg.com) 2

jthill writes: "Psychohistory" is the basis for the eentirentire Foundation series. Hari Seldon is a university mathematician, develops models good enough to predict social developments the same way engineers can predict physical ones: given enough individuals, probabilistic aggregate behavior becomes all but completely predictable.

So now some mathematicians at Cornell have developed a probabilistic model that behaves like real social groups. Karate clubs. Republicans and Democrats. From the article:

They plugged in data on international relations prior to World War II and got almost perfect predictions on how the Axis and Allied alliances formed.


Submission + - Stuxnet was designed to subtly interfere with uran (wired.com)

ceswiedler writes: "Wired.com is reporting that the Stuxnet worm was apparently designed to subtly interfere with uranium enrichment by periodically speeding or slowing specific frequency converter drives spinning between 807Hz and 1210Hz. The goal was not to cause a major malfunction (which would be quickly noticed), but rather to degrade the quality of the enriched uranium to the point where much of it wouldn't be useful in atomic weapons. Statistics from 2009 show that the number of enriched centrifuges operational in Iran mysteriously declined from about 4,700 to about 3,900 at around the time the worm was spreading in Iran."
Microsoft

Submission + - Microsoft vs McAfee:How free antivirus outperforme (zdnet.com)

suraj.sun writes: Microsoft vs. McAfee: How free antivirus outperformed paid

How effective is free antivirus software? I had a chance to see a real, in-the-wild example just this month, and the results were, to put it mildly, unexpected. The bottom line? Microsoft’s free antivirus solution found and removed a threat that two well-known paid products missed.

Microsoft Security Essentials had detected several files files that it considered malicious. One was a rigged PDF file (not shown here). The other was a single file in the Java cache folder on this system that contained three separate exploits. Using the information in the MSE history pane, I found the file and uploaded it to Virustotal.com, which is a free service that allows you to scan a suspicious file using 43 separate antivirus engines.

Only 17 of 43 antivirus products detected this as a threat. The full results page showed the identification, if any, for each product on the list. Microsoft, Symantec, Avast, and F-Secure were among the engines that flagged the file. But the majority didn’t.

ZDNet: http://www.zdnet.com/blog/bott/microsoft-vs-mcafee-how-free-antivirus-outperformed-paid/2614

Submission + - Michio Kaku: Invisibility Cloaks, Singularity (singularityhub.com)

kkleiner writes: Michio Kaku is a physics professor at CUNY with an impressive resume of publications – he was among the first to develop string field theory. Despite this intimidating background, or perhaps due to it, Kaku is also a very approachable popularizer of science. He’s a best selling author many times over, hosts two radio programs that explain and discuss experiments and technology, and has an ongoing blog at Big Think wherein he answers questions from his readers. Recently, he discussed the possibilities of invisibility cloaks, programmable matter, and a Technological Singularity. According to Kaku, Moore’s Law alone isn’t enough to guarantee the rise of artificial intelligence, but we may have human like AI by the end of the 21st century.

Slashdot Top Deals

The brain is a wonderful organ; it starts working the moment you get up in the morning, and does not stop until you get to work.

Working...