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Comment Re:Contrast this with the incoming administration (Score 1) 86

The peasants don't understand that most "green" energy causes more pollution than natural gas...

At most, only during the manufacturing phase, and this is more than compensated for by the vastly smaller environmental footprint accumulating over the lifetime of the device.

Comment Re:As someone with a masters in this -exact field- (Score 1) 269

When they make you feel like a moron, it's not because they are trying to, or because what they are saying sounds like something you could never understand, but exactly the opposite. You can fully understand what they are saying, but you simultaneously gain some insight into just how far beyond you they really are. It's a humbling experience, being taught by a genius in their field... and I was fortunate enough to have it happen to me once... While I came out of it knowing vastly more than I knew going in, I can honestly say I still felt stupider than when I started.

Comment 3D movies and television would be good if.... (Score 2) 397

... one, there was no requirement to wear glasses, and two, no matter where you are viewing it from, you would see it as it would naturally be seen from that angle if the things depicted in the scene were real and solid objects in the space that they seem to be in. Each of your eyes, by virtue of seeing the image from a slightly different angle, would cause your brain to perceive a 3 dimensional image automatically, exactly as you perceive the real physical world around you.

The only way to do this that I know of is with holograms, but seeing a full color holographic display at any time in the near future seems unlikely.

Comment Re:Very dissapointing. (Score 1) 558

Yup, and it's apparent now that probably the only reason he ever said what he did in the first place was because at the time, he likely didn't think it would actually happen.

Nowhere in his original comment did the word "immediately" appear. Although the Justice Department claims that Assange's comments were not the basis for her sentence being commuted, the conditions that Assange originally stated were nonetheless fulfilled completely by Obama's decision to do this, and Assange is now backpedaling and trying to make it look like he might have meant something other than the words that he actually originally said.

And for what it's worth, her sentence *WAS* commuted 'immediately'. Obama decided it, and it's now it's happened. Done and done. It's my understanding that the 120-day waiting period until her actual release is standard for giving the person opportunity to relocate successfully instead of just pushing someone out to the curb from prison and them not having anywhere to go or anything to do.

Assange is a liar. Full stop.

Comment Re:"developed an artificial intelligence(AI) progr (Score 1) 153

The definition of artificial could be obvious... it is anything that is not natural. which is to say that it is not made or caused by mankind. Artificial intelligence would therefore be intelligence that *has* been made or caused by mankind. However, since "intelligence" is so poorly defined, the expression still cannot mean anything, despite half of the expression having an unambiguous meaning.

Comment Re:"developed an artificial intelligence(AI) progr (Score 2) 153

The only reason the term doesn't have any meaning is because everyone's definition of "intelligence" is different in the first place. If you can define an unambiguous metric for intelligence, then it becomes pretty obvious what AI has to be: intelligence that is artificial, rather than natural.

Comment Re: It's about landmass (Score 1) 467

I think the Gigafactory 1 will make ZERO cars. It's about making batteries.

I tried to point out that it was a typo.... I didn't clarify immediately because I thought it might have been clear. What I meant was:

Do you seriously think the gigafactory is going to be making anything for anything but luxury-priced cars?

I wouldn't trust *any* company these days to bring down their own prices unless they were driven to do so by competition. Tesla is already having considerable success at selling cars priced more than 3 times as much as a similarly sized gasoline powered car, what possible incentive would they have to change that unless somebody else starts competing directly competing directly in their own class? I have heard, but not been able to confirm that other EV manufacturers are going to benefit from Tesla's gigafactory, but I'm pretty sure that if they did, Tesla would probably charge fees for its usage that would make it unviable for other manufacturers to be able to lower their prices much anyways. The only real difference would be in the quantity they could produce, not the end consumer price.

Comment Re:It's about landmass (Score 1) 467

If you reread what I wrote, I said that in general, the most costly maintenance that needs to be done on cars doesn't tend to happen any sooner than the extended warranty would *otherwise* offer. I did not suggest that everyone would necessarily get an exteded warranty. I do, but that's beside the point. My own experience is that the costs of doing so are *MORE* than compensated for by even a single unexpected incident that would otherwise be covered, and are in fact only modestly above what you would have otherwise paid for the kinds of regular maintenance it covers in that period anyways. bviously they are making a profit on it, but I don't object to other people making money, nor do I object to paying a little more for a convenience factor. I *do* object to paying more money for something that is less convenient, however, and the cost of maintenance over the first 5 years or so works out to perhaps a quarter of the price difference between an EV and a comparable sized vehicle, where gasoline is perhaps double that. Just around the time that the different in up-front cost for an EV might otherwise start to pay for itself in terms of savings, you have to replace the battery, which chews up another several years worth of maintenance and gasoline. Sure, in the long run an EV will save you money.... but the amount of time that you have to wait for it to do that is longer than the time that most people even own a car, unless they drive old beater cars that are so reliable that they'd be nuts to consider a trade-in.

And frankly only an idiot buys a new car.

Bad form... that's called poisoning the well, and is a type of ad-hominem argument that is equivalent to a logical fallacy.

I buy new cars because my experience has been that they have fewer maintenance issues and unexpected surprises than used vehicles. This makes them easier to budget for. I don't buy a car because I expect to get my money back, I buy a car to reliably and economically get me from place to place. Generally, I will try and drive a car until the cost of maintenance starts to climb to unacceptable levels. This invariably happens much sooner with used cars than with new. And somehow, my trying to be prudent with the money that I have at the moment makes me an idiot... Not sure how that works, but if you want to believe that, I'm not gonna stop you.

Comment Re: It's about landmass (Score 1) 467

I saw the typo instantly after I hit submit, but I was hoping it would be clear. Apparently not.

What I meant was:

Do you seriously think the gigafactory is going to be making anything for anything but luxury-priced cars?

It's Tesla's gigafactory.... And Tesla is not cheap. Even their so-called economy model costs more than 3 times as much as a similarly-sized gasoline car. Tesla isn't about to lower their price because they are already associated with a luxury brand, and people who can afford them are buying them, so Tesla has no incentive to drop their price.

Comment Re:It's about landmass (Score 1) 467

Yes, EV maintenance can be about 35% cheaper than ICE... but most of this maintenance cost difference does not typically even come into play until the car is past the period of any extended warranty that the manufacturer would otherwise offer... by which time you've finished paying for it, and can afford the extra couple of thousand dollars per year for maintence. EV's are more expensive up front, and the costs that you save on gasoline, the only significant cost for the first few years of ownership, are not as much as the price difference you'd have to pay on financing for the same amount of time as you would have financed a less expensive gasoline-powered car that was the same size as the EV you might have been considering. You can push out the payments over a longer period to lower the overall monthly burden and make it more financially attainable, but then you are making it take even longer before you actually will be begin to break even.

Not long after that, you would be looking at replacing the battery on an EV, which will chew up several more years more of gasoline and maintenance costs. In practice, you are not going to see any savings at all until well over a decade of driving it. Many people don't even drive a single car for that long.

Comment Re: It's about landmass (Score 1) 467

Less than a decade? Not likely. By the middle of this century, more probably. However, that is most probably outside of my expected lifespan, unless I am very lucky.

I would be completely willing to get an EV if and when they 1) didn't have such a large up-front cost such that you wouldn't even start to see any savings on gasoline costs for years down the road; and 2) there were subsidies that brought the costs down for installing electric charging outlets in older buildings. I just don't think that they are both likely to happen as soon as you believe that they will. You call it myopia, I call it cynical skepticism. Life is anything but ideal, and in my experience, it is never realistic to expect to ever become so.

Comment Re:It's about landmass (Score 1) 467

Yes, prices have dropped significantly on EV's.... but I honestly don't expect them to come down in price that much more. Cheaper cars will come out sure, but the Nissan Leaf, for instance, which retails in Canada starting at about $33k is a quite tiny car that is comparable in size to a gasoline-powered car that you could probably buy brand new for about $10k. And that's just for the cheapest electric car that there is.... for something of more usable size, it's just a whole lot more money. More reasonably, I'd be looking at upwards of $50k where a comparably sized gasoline vehicle currently costs about $20k. Costs are going to come down, sure.... but slowly. They'll become more popular certainly, but I don't think that they will hit a critical mass threshold in anything less than 30 years.

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