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Submission + - Physicists detect whiff of new particle at the LHC

randomErr writes: Physicists are finding signs of something unexpected at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world’s biggest atom smasher at CERN. The hints of a new particle doesn't come from the LHC’s two large detectors that found the Higgs boson particle in 2012. Instead a smaller detector, called LHCb. Each one of LHCb’s sub-detectors specializes in measuring a different characteristic of the particles produced by colliding protons.

The latest signal involves deviations in the decays of particles called B mesons. While not significant on it's own together with other results could point to new particles lying on the high-energy horizon. “This has never happened before, to observe a set of coherent deviations that could be explained in a very economical way with one single new physics contribution,” says Joaquim Matias, a theorist at the Autonomous University of Barcelona in Spain.

Comment Re:COBOL isn't hard to learn (Score 5, Funny) 306

SAP is more likely to go the way of the dinosaurs than Cobol.

Which reminds me of this joke:

In 1998, a programmer who had been working on Y2K fixes started to get anxious because he couldn't believe how pervasive the problem was. He switched from company to company trying to get away from it, but everywhere he went he became regarded as the Y2K expert and immediately became the team lead for that company's Y2K contingencies. He finally had a nervous breakdown, quit his job, and decided he wanted to be knocked unconscious when the Y2K actually came about.

A month before Y2K he was put into an artificial coma and cooled down to a near cryogenic easily sustained long term life support.

Unfortunately the life support notification system had a Y2K bug, and no one revived him for 8000 years.

Finally he was found and revived. He woke up, and saw himself surrounded by lots of glass, light, stainless steel, and tall beautiful people in white robes. He asked if he was in Heaven.

They replied, "No, this is Chicago. Actually but it's a lot like Heaven to someone like you."

"Someone like me?"

"You are from the 20th century. Many of the problems that existed in your lifetime have been solved for thousands of years. There is no hunger and no disease. There is no scarcity, or strife between races and creeds."

"What year is it now?"

"Yeah, about that - it's the year 9,998. You see, the year 10,000 is coming up, and we understand you know something called COBOL?"

Comment Re:Why not? (Score 2) 306

OO is good for cases where you have use for multiple instances of known items. That is applicable to many solutions but it comes with a cost too. That cost is added overhead caused by inheritance since not every object uses all stuff it inherits, only parts of it - especially when the model is built by many persons that need a very general solution to a problem.

Maintainability is also a problem when you get stuff that's obsoleted - it may be impossible to remove stuff from the parent objects because at least one inherited object still seems to use it. So code rot can be a problem in a system where people don't have full understanding of what was written a decade ago.

Submission + - Spying on Students in the Classroom (eff.org)

schwit1 writes: It seems a day doesn’t go by without another report of a company monitoring what we do on the Internet and selling that data to generate more revenue. And now the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has examined what happens to the data that's collected from students using technology in the classroom. They released the results of an extensive survey covering students in grades K-12.

What they found was that little work has been done to protect the privacy of the student information that is collected from both the classroom and from using the online software the schools issue for use at home on the students' own devices. They found that while many school districts have embraced technology and all of the benefits it can bring to the schools and students, often little thought has been given to one of the unintended consequences of this: the students' privacy.

The study was very extensive and took two years to complete. Virtually everything was examined, including what's being done along each point from the suppliers of hardware and software and the cloud services, to the schools and the students. They found that lots of data is being collected without permission and that it's easy for outside companies to access the data. They also discovered that there's little to prevent suppliers from sharing data with others, including advertisers.

Submission + - Intel Puma6 modems highly vulnerable to DOS attack (dslreports.com)

Idisagree writes: It's being reported by users from the dslreports forum that the Puma6 Intel cable modem variants are highly susceptible to a very low bandwidth DOS attack.

To add to this there are class actions lawsuits already going forward for performance issues with the Puma6. (https://www.classactionlawyers.com/puma6/)

It would appear the atom chip was never going to live up to the task it was designed for and these issues may have been known within Intel for quite some time.

Submission + - Norwegian slow TV with raindeer migratin live for an entire week.

gaijin_ writes: The Norwegian broadcasting company (NRK) has a new slow TV program running. They are following a group of Sàmi raindeer herders moving with their herd the 230km migration from winter to summer pastrures. All of this is sendt live 24 hours a day from one of the most remote places in Europe. The Guardian has an article in english. The show is running on broadcast TV in Norway and is available for streaming all over the world.

Comment Re:Yes but (Score 1) 716

Just ad Honorary to the title Dr and you are good. Then it's up to the reader to put values into that - or do their research for why it was a honorary awarded title. Some people just do a heck of a good job without hunting titles and some of them can rightfully get a honorary award.

Of course there are people knot knowing anything of the subject that also get those awards because they have at least promoted the subject, possibly as an actor.

Submission + - US ISP Goes Down as Two Malware Families Go to War Over Its Modems (bleepingcomputer.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Two malware families battling for turf are most likely the cause of an outage suffered by Californian ISP Sierra Tel at the beginning of the month, on April 10. The attack, which the company claimed it was a "malicious hacking event," was the work of BrickerBot, an IoT malware family that bricks unsecured IoT and networking devices.

"BrickerBot was active on the Sierra Tel network at the time their customers reported issues," Janit0r told Bleeping Computer in an email, "but their modems had also just been mass-infected with malware, so it's possible some of the network problems were caused by this concomitant activity."

The crook, going by Janit0r, tried to pin some of the blame on Mirai, but all the clues point to BrickerBot, as Sierra Tel had to replace bricked modems altogether, or ask customers to bring in their modems at their offices to have it reset and reinstalled. Mirai brought down over 900,000 Deutsche Telekom modems last year, but that outage was fixed within hours with a firmware update. All the Sierra Tel modems bricked in this incident were Zyxel HN-51 models, and it took Sierra Tel almost two weeks to fix all bricked devices.

Submission + - Why Did Google Really Block A Guerrilla Fighter In The Ad War? (fastcompany.com)

tedlistens writes: Google's decision to ban the Chrome plug-in AdNauseum due to a violation of its "single purpose policy"—shortly after the app began supporting the EFF's new Do Not Track standard—was only the latest salvo in an ongoing war over online advertising. The ad industry knows that ads are a nuisance, and it's now taking pre-emptive measures to make them more palatable—or, in Google's case, to block the unpalatable ones. But Google's positions also point to a crucial disagreement at the heart of the ad war: What makes ads such a nuisance to begin with?

Ads aren't just ugly, annoying, and bandwidth-sucking: They pose a risk to privacy, as the networks of software behind ads—cookies, trackers, and malware—watch not only where you go on the web but, through your phone and your purchases, what you do in real life. But privacy is largely missing from Google's discussion of problematic ads, says Howe. By avoiding mentioning AdNauseum's actual intent, Google's explanation for banning it echoes the advertising industry's discussion of web ads, which focuses on aesthetics rather than privacy.

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