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Comment Interesting, but not unexpected (Score 4, Insightful) 210

People running Firefox are users who are more aware than standard users. They have gone out and downloaded a non-standard (for not tech people) browser and are using it. It makes sense that they are more likely aware of their OS, and what they would want or not want; as well as able to avoid the forced Windows 10 upgrade many techies were forced into.

Comment Who is the game for? (Score 1) 221

I think the biggest problem is that I don't know who they are targeting. The casual gamer (generally using phones and tablets) aren't going to pay this, and me as a traditional gamer sees it as a waste of money for a 'Run' style game. I downloaded it and was hopeful since it was Mario/Nintendo, but really I don't think I need much more than the free levels. It's not engaging to me, and seems to be too expensive for people who find $1.99 a lot to pay at times.

Comment Re:Unfortunate (Score 2) 101

No I agree. I mean that people don't understand that cheap cables are a potential problem, regardless of if they say they are compatible or not. The lawsuit issue is that they are lying about packaging. My point is more that people have no idea that there is a real danger or problem, so they just think Apple is trying to gouge them. Which I'm sure the price is a huge profit margin, but there is a real benefit in this case outside of just the name on the package.

Comment Unfortunate (Score 2) 101

This is what happens when people don't understand tech. No one wants to care how their devices work, they just hear battery and equate it to their favorite AA and away they go. Not understanding that there is more involved than that, they just but cheap when they need a new or extra cable. I can understand that, but then we have these sorts of issues.

Comment Ransomeware Only (Score 1) 194

Looking at the links and white paper, this is really related to Ransomware and Defender only. In that regard, they are certainly getting better, which then makes it an easy marketing statement to make. But everyone is (generally) getting better over time. Reading between the lines, what this is really saying is that Windows Defender is most likely Good Enough for most home users, and realistically it probably is. Most signature based software is terrible and has a 40-something% efficacy rating. The free AV has been shown to be untrustworthy with adware or selling data or various unsavory activities.

Compared to enterprise/corporate options, it's really not a worthy comparison unless you have to implement it for compliance reasons. Some corporate solutions are not considered AV in the compliance sense, even if they perform the same role. And if you really are a geek and like to have better control this won't be what you want either. There are a lot of caveats in their claim, but it makes headlines.

Comment Re:Different targets (Score 1) 210

Yes. This is something I've noticed with friends who wear them. I hear how many steps they walked, but I don't know anyone that took a baseline of how many steps they walk normally. If you are already walking 8000 steps a day, then walking 10,000 isn't that big a deal (I'm making up numbers). They really need to build in a deficit to show 'you are below your daily average' vs just a raw total that may make you feel more productive than you really were.

Comment Re:Computer Power and Human Reasoning (Score 3, Informative) 428

Exactly. A person was not sitting there watching the news thinking 'Excellent, we can get some extra dollars from this.' The algorithm saw more people than normal were suddenly looking for a ride, and the prices went up. From what I see, when Uber realized _why_ they tried to make adjustments, but people still complained they weren't adjusting it enough or in all areas or such.

This isn't a company trying to profit from terrorism; this is a company who has a product that is not being accused because they probably haven't had to deal with this before. And accurate news coverage during these times isn't exactly spot on; I doubt it was clear who/what/where was going on so they could accurately make all changes that in hindsight would have made sense.

Submission + - Malibu Media stay lifted, motion to quash denied

NewYorkCountryLawyer writes: In the federal court for the Eastern District of New York, where all Malibu Media cases have been stayed for the past year, the Court has lifted the stay and denied the motion to quash in the lead case, thus permitting all 84 cases to move forward. In his 28-page decision (PDF), Magistrate Judge Steven I. Locke accepted the representations of Malibu's expert, one Michael Patzer from a company called Excipio, that in detecting BitTorrent infringement he relies on "direct detection" rather than "indirect detection", and that it is "not possible" for there to be misidentification.

Comment The Pitch is the Problem (Score 4, Informative) 170

Most people see a tablet and know what they want to do with it, or are surprised when it's better than expected. Only tech reviewers and vendor marketing departments were planning on tablets replacing all those things listed. I bought mine because I wanted a tablet, not a phone replacement or a laptop replacement or an interactive dinner plate/hack du jour. I assume most of it is due to a need to generate sales and page views and all that, but mostly I found it was all fairly silly. I like my tablet because it's a tablet, stop trying to tell me why I _should_ like it.

Comment Re:Actually 3rd point was agreement with trial jud (Score 1) 23

Actually whoever the new guy is, I don't find the site to be "improved" at all; seems a little crummy. The story was butchered and incorrectly interpreted, and the all important software for interaction seems less interactive.

But what do I know?

As to my absence I've been a bit overwhelmed by work stuff, sorry about that, it's no excuse :)

Comment Actually 3rd point was agreement with trial judge (Score 4, Informative) 23

The story as published implies that the ruling overruled the lower court on the 3 issues. In fact, it was agreeing with the trial court on the third issue -- that the sporadic instances of Vimeo employees making light of copyright law did not amount to adopting a "policy of willful blindness".

Submission + - Appeals court slams record companies on DMCA in Vimeo case

NewYorkCountryLawyer writes: In the long-simmering appeal in Capitol Records v. Vimeo, the US Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit upheld Vimeo's positions on many points regarding the Digital Millenium Copyright Act. In its 55 page decision (PDF) the Court ruled that (a) the Copyright Office was dead wrong in concluding that pre-1972 sound recordings aren't covered by the DMCA, (b) the judge was wrong to think that Vimeo employees' merely viewing infringing videos was sufficient evidence of "red flag knowledge", and (c) a few sporadic instances of employees being cavalier about copyright law did not amount to a "policy of willful blindness" on the part of the company. The Court seemed to take particular pleasure in eviscerating the Copyright Office's rationales. Amicus curiae briefs in support of Vimeo had been submitted by a host of companies and organizations including the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the Computer & Communications Industry Association, Public Knowledge, Google, Yahoo!, Facebook, Microsoft, Pinterest, Tumblr, and Twitter.

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