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Comment Re:Perhaps a better method... (Score 1) 451

It's sort of like if someone explains Japanese is a language, you know, like Spanish or Portuguese. Don't use two other mutual-intelligible languages, which happen to be totally different than the one you're talking about, as your examples.

To be fair, there really aren't *any* languages similar to Japanese. The closest is probably Chinese (Mandarin), but that's only because Japanese borrows a bunch of written characters from it, for one of the three character sets, called Kanji. (So Japanese people can make out a few written words in Chinese, and vice versa, much like English speakers can make out a few words in French which we've borrowed.) The pronunciation, grammar rules, syntax, etc. are all completely different. Japanese isn't even a tonal language like Chinese.

The only languages similar to Japanese are other "Japonic" languages, which are all used only in Japan, and within Japan are merely considered dialects of Japanese, and almost no one outside of Japan would have heard of these languages anyway as they're endangered, much like other languages spoken only by a small number of people, such as Romansh used in a small part of Switzerland by about 60k people, or the Frisian languages used by about 500k people in Netherlands and Germany.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

So if you wanted to say "Japanese is a language, you know like...", you'd do best just listing 2 or 3 completely unrelated languages, such as Portuguese, Russian, and Hindi, because there simply aren't any well-known languages that are similar to Japanese.

Comment How I interview my candidates. (Score 1) 451

Lucky for me I have not had to take an interview since 1994. And I have been on the asking side ever since.

I give them a problem to solve. I ask for an algorithm, not specific language. Something like: "A trip has a starting city and an ending city. There is a list of all the trips made by John. Where did he start and where did he finish?". Then the interview proceeds based on the answers I get. Most people do linear search. "How does this answer scale as the number of trip increases?" "What happens if he started and ended in the same city?" "What if the trips did not form one chain?" "Can you find how many chains there are?" "How will you speed up your code?".

More than the solution or the answer, I am looking to see if the candidate understands me and can he/she tell me what she/he is doing. If I say, "ok, Let us say you build a map between starting point and the trip index. Would that help you speed up your code?" can the candidate understand what I am saying, if he/she can't understand ask intelligent questions to understand me, do they show an interest in understanding and solving the problem, are they comfortable in communication etc.

Puzzles have their place. If you solve puzzle instantly, it just means you have seen it before. That gives me no input. If you muddle through the solution, it means it is a fresh puzzle. Opens up lots of avenues for communication, letting me ask questions, offer suggestions and hints, and see how these hints are understood etc. I take extreme pains to put the candidates at ease. Tell them up front, "I am not looking for a final finished correct answer. I am looking to see how you find the answer. So feel free to think aloud, tell me how you plan to solve the problem, ask me if something would work or not etc. "

Comment Re:How is this a bad thing? (Score 1) 185

Whether you are politically left, right or agnostic, the surveillance state should be a serious concern for all those who value privacy and liberty.

Which is who? Not very many Americans, as proven by all the people who use Twitter and Facebook and happily make themselves dependent on monopolistic corporations.

Face it; no one cares about privacy any more.

Comment Re:This happens with every change in administratio (Score 1) 185

However, every time that people point to a single incidence or something like that and then use it to characterize the entire community of intelligence or law enforcement, all it does is make those people feel like they are being attacked.

Every time cops do something wrong, all the other cops, and the prosecutors and judges, stand behind them even when it's as blatant as shooting unarmed people in the back.

These people *should* be attacked.

That is not actually a good thing. If you think it is, go talk to the people in neighborhoods that the police now avoid because they feel like they don't have the support of the community. Ask them if they think it is a good thing.

Why should I care about what a bunch of thugs and murderers think is a good thing? If they weren't such abusive assholes, then maybe they'd have more community support. They've earned their reputation fairly.

Second, I have said this before and I will say this again: the government (at all levels, from local to federal, including military, policy, intelligence, etc.) is a representation of the society from which it is drawn.

Now this is exactly correct. The problem is, our society is not homogeneous. So the police are not drawn from across society; they're drawn from one part of society that loves authoritarianism and approves of brutality and murder of anyone who doesn't meekly obey their racist authority. But there is a significant part of society which does back up the police, including authoritarians like you, which is why they stay in power.

Absolutely, if something is being done against the law, the perpetrators need to be dealt with

Except when it's done by the police, right? Because that's the way it's been up until everyone and their brother had portable video recorders in their pockets to document their abuses.

In fact, when you look at law enforcement and intelligence, the special power which they have over their fellow citizens means that any violation should be dealt with very harshly.

Sounds great; an authoritarian giving lip service to doing the right thing. Problem is, it doesn't work out that way in practice; people like you will always side with the cops no matter how blatant their abuse.

Comment Re:This happens with every change in administratio (Score 1) 185

In addition to that, if Trump gets the defense budget increases he is seeking, that will translate directly into increased funding for the intelligence community, which will likely improve morale overall.

No it won't. You're somehow assuming that increased defense spending will somehow equate to higher salaries, which is simply preposterous. Increased spending just means more mandates to do more stuff: build more ships, more weapons, etc. That doesn't mean that individual salaries will actually go up, in fact likely the opposite, because Trump is really big on decreasing Federal spending and "doing more with less". So sure, maybe the intelligence community will get more funding, but that comes with the provision that they hire more people and do more stuff. The actual workers will still be held to the same Federal worker pay schedules, and most likely the cost-of-living increases will be cut to keep spending low.

Comment Re:Help them leave (Score 1) 185

You'll fuck over the poor, you'll fuck over the future. You poor deluded fuck.

Wow, you're really the deluded one here. In case you haven't noticed, Trump and the GOP are working very hard to fuck over the poor, such as by repealing the Medicaid expansion and by repealing Obamacare without replacing it with anything that actually works for lower-income people. Then they want to lower taxes for ultra-rich people. You talk about "fucking over the poor", while simultaneously defending the people who have that as their explicit party platform. Sad.

Comment Re: All my friends in NSA are looking (Score 1) 185

I disagree entirely. Walking away is *always* the best course of action, unless you're in a position of power (and even that's questionable, because if you're the NSA director and refuse to "do your job" you'll probably be sacked).

Decisions and policy always come from the top. If you're a low-level peon (as any engineer is; face it, this is not a prestigious profession with any real power), then you either do what your superiors tell you, or you resign, or you get fired. There is no "stay and try to fix the problem"; you do not have that power.

Comment Re: All my friends in NSA are looking (Score 1) 185

Everyone has a different bar; obviously, Snowden's and your standards are different from this unnamed guy's. It's not black and white.

What's remarkable about this article is how apparently bad the morale is at the NSA now. So obviously, a lot of NSA insiders were at least somewhat OK with things post-Snowden (or with the things Snowden revealed), but now they're *not* OK with how things are going now with Trump in office.

It's kinda like the Mafia: even they have their limits. They'll happily do "protection" rackets, prostitution, etc., but do something that victimizes young children and suddenly they're morally opposed. (A lot of hardened criminals are like this, which is why child predators have to be kept separate from them in prison.) This isn't to say NSA employees are like the Mafia or other hardened criminals, I'm just pointing out the parallel: everyone has different standards, and at some point can be pushed too far, or asked to do something that's beyond their morals, and that appears to be what we're seeing here.

Comment Re:Perhaps a better method... (Score 1) 451

My interviews are generally as follows (this is for a testing role where they are expected to understand and be able to code, but not be a rockstar developer):

* get to know you, see if you would gel with the team (because if the team hates you and you hate the team, we're not going to waste anyone's time)
* simple coding problem (why doesn't this work):

use strict;
print "this is the header of the output\n";
for (my $i=0;$i>30;$i++){
print "mod5: " . $i%5 . "\n";
}
print "where are the entries?\n";

It's crazy simple. It's also amazing how many people get tripped up on it.

* some harder questions about "how would you" and not dumbassed (for our work needs) determine the number of piano tuners in seattle questions, but rather "handle conflicting priorities, that you know are both critical, and you don't have enough time to finish in time."
"handle a hostile customer in the lab" (and we let their imagination run with what we mean)

It's all about how they think.

As to the "implement a bubblesort on the whiteboard" I have had these kinds of interviews and have always passed them with:
"I'll do it if you want, but I'll certainly make at least one error. In real life I would #include "sortLib" and be done with it, and I know where to look for the answers to nearly all problems in code structure I am likely to face; including asking Sr devs if needed.

Comment 1 billion hours watched on you tube (Score 1) 139

Take that figure with a pinch of salt. Many you tube videos automatically load and play the next stream. So many hours of it are played on monitors that have gone to sleep or played on monitors no one is watching.

But still, most of the streaming is done to handheld tablets, or phones or laptops or netbooks. My 14 inch chromebook screen at 3 feet covers the same range as the 42 inch across the room. Unless there is more than one person watching the same thing, it does not make sense to cast anything to the TV. Given the full keyboard on chromebook and unusable screen key board in Roku there is no real reason to mess with it.

Submission + - Brianna Wu Is A Harsh Mistress (washingtontimes.com) 2

Applehu Akbar writes: A transgender-issues activist and Democratic candidate for Congress says the advent of the space tourism industry could give private corporations a “frightening amount of power” to destroy the Earth with rocks because of the Moon’s military importance.
Brianna Wu, a prominent “social justice warrior” in the “Gamergate” controversy who now is running for the House seat in Massachusetts’ 8th District, suggested in a since-deleted tweet that companies could drop rocks from the Moon.
“The moon is probably the most tactically valuable military ground for earth,” the tweet said. “Rocks dropped from there have power of 100s of nuclear bombs.”

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