Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!


Forgot your password?
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Comment Re:Not a copyright violation, a Trademark violatio (Score 1) 195

No it's not legitimate if he merely mentioned either. Merely mentioning a trademark doesn't mean you're in violation of trademark law, otherwise you wouldn't be able to talk about most commercial products. The precise restrictions on trademarked word use are best described by a lawyer, but remember the intent of trademark law is to prevent people from passing an item off as something associated with the trademark owner, not to restrict people's ability to talk about products they've seen or owned.

For more information, visit Bing and google "trademarks".

Comment Re:About time. (Score 1) 121

Medical professionals have a professional duty to state medical facts. If they refuse, they can and should be placed in a different career path.

An accountant or lawyer promoting a Sovereign Citizen view of the relationship between client and state would be struck off. A Bridge Engineer who rejects Newtonian (or better) mechanics would be struck off.

This isn't like banning a doctor from discussing gun safety because you lobbyists are worried it might lead to a decrease in household gun ownership. This is about nurses being required not to mislead people about medicine, abusing their positions as respected medical professionals to sow misinformation. It's not a freedom of speech issue, it's a professionalism issue, and critically it's a life and death issue.

Comment Re:Or... (Score 1) 84

Funny thing is after I lived with the flip phone for a year or so, about a year ago I bought the cheapest smartphone I could ($30, at Walmart!) and was stunned at how much better it was than the GN. OK, the screen was worse, as was the amount of storage -- though the fact it took SD cards mitigated that in part, but it really was faster, smoother, and the UI had less bugs. It resold me on Android.

I honestly don't think price has much to do with device "niceness" in the Android world. Sure, in the early days, you had a few "cheap" phones with sub-WVGA screens that were barely usable, and right until a couple of years ago even the slightly better ones seemed cobbled together, but right now I'm actually seeing low end hardware that's caught up with Android's needs, while critical features continue to get removed from phones as they get more expensive.

And some of those removed features do, actually, make the phone less frustrating. That cheap $30 Walmart special had dedicated navigation buttons for example - its replacement doesn't, meaning I have to swipe from the corners to get buttons that'll close a full screen app or just send that full screen app a "back" signal. How is that an improvement? It isn't. The buttons are removed because it interferes with the lines of the device and would make it fractionally bigger, aesthetic considerations that undermine usability and makes the device more annoying to use.

Comment Or... (Score 3, Interesting) 84

...maybe it's because people who buy $600 phones tend to have more money (and less worries) than people who buy $50 devices.

I'll be honest, the most expensive modern smartphone I bought was a Galaxy Nexus. It definitely didn't make me happier; the quirks and horrible UI actually made me switch to a flip phone in an effort to regain my sanity.

Comment Re:Leave the douchebag alone (Score 2) 162

And "international criminals" like Assange also do not need to be here if they are charged with something like distributing classified information. If there is evidence, then charge him with a crime. If there's not, leave him alone.

The 2 things that stick out to me is how they can charge an Australian citizen living abroad with violating a domestic US law, and how is it that the US based NYT was not guilty of the same basic charges in the Pentagon Papers leak publication as the ones they level at Assange.


Comment Re: Phone (Score 4, Insightful) 162

However this man is not a hero, he is a criminal trading in stolen goods - goods he stole from every American. We need to keep that in mind.

"Trading in stolen goods" eh?

Since when has theft of public ignorance been a crime?

Oh yeah, ever since we've had criminal politicians who've relied on public ignorance to avoid prosecution, that's when.


Comment Re:I wonder... (Score 2) 172

Bad news. I just invented time travel, and rather than do something worthwhile like kill Hitler (or, in some other way, ensure he never gains power) I've decided to cause minor annoyances for other Slashdotters.

I'm going to go back in time, suggest to Steve Jobs he adds a scroll wheel to the iPod, and change history so it becomes the most popular MP3 player of all time, and Creative becomes an also ran rather than the inventor of the cPhone!

That'll make the comment you just wrote look ridiculous!

Comment Re:we need more disenfranchisement (Score 1) 40

I don't know that I've ever heard anyone propose an east/west division

Neither have I. The line formed by the Missouri Compromise is the most common reference used by the nutcases who want to build more fences to lock people in/out. Extending it through the middle of California would be the ideal for *his people* (except he and his redneck friends would have to move south, into lala land, the horror!).

Comment Re:Nintendo OFFICIALLY has left the "console" mark (Score 1) 237

This might be the next thing in portable gaming systems, but there is no way this will be 'console' class.

The latest Nvidia Tegra X series chips have excellent performance, in the same ballpark as previous generation of game consoles. Now, while you might say "Yeah, but not the current gen", Nintendo has lately prioritized price and flexibility over having CPUs and GPUs comparable to Microsoft and Sony's. If the Wii and Wii U were considered console class at the time, so is this. Except they couldn't cluster, while this one can.

I don't think it's reasonable to suggest it's a PS-vita with a dock either. The video is at pains to suggest the technology is designed for a more fluid playing experience, with the type of thing you want to do (play against friends, play a conventional game at home in comfort, play in a plane or train, etc) determining how you configure your console.

Will it work? No idea. If they can keep the price down, conceivably yes. I think the big problem with consoles right now is that they're expensive toys for a committed minority. Nintendo misfired with the WiiU, but the biggest, most glaring, fault wasn't the hardware, but the price and pricing.

Comment Re:Escalation? (Score 1) 300

They're not removing USB, they're removing the original, large, four dimensional USB socket for USB-C. It's a standard USB port, and about the only inconvenience is that you'll need adapters or new cables for your older USB gear. Right now, I'm seeing "USB sticks" as being the main loser.

You guys think this is bad, but I started computing in the 1980s, and I can tell you back then this kind of thing would have been considered a giant leap forward. Virtually every brand of computer had:

1. Its own idea of what a keyboard port should look like
2. Its own idea of what a monitor port should look like
3. Its own idea of what a serial port should look like (hell, that even varied from model to model in a computer makers own product line.)
4. Its own idea of what a printer port should look like
5. Its own idea of what a mouse port should look like
6. Its own idea of what a joystick port should look like
7. Its own idea of what a disk drive port should look like

USB-A switching to USB-C? Great! They're switching from one standard to another, but it's still a well supported standard, and there are good reasons to do so. Well done Apple. Now, if you could add USB to your iDevices...

Comment Re:I mean... (Score 1) 195

In fairness, pretty much everyone already knows about the Note 7 fiasco.


If the modder were to modify the mod to include references to other Samsung phones, other than the Note 7, which would be used in the same way, then Samsung can consider the merits of either leaving it be, or doing the same thing, resulting in a large amount of publicity for a story that suggests the Note 7 was not unusual, that Samsung might actually have an exploding phone problem in general.

Slashdot Top Deals

The following statement is not true. The previous statement is true.