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Comment Re: In other words. . . (Score 2) 314

I favor the libertarian model. Just to be clear, I'm not a Libertarian but I like many points of their philosophy.

Many people are surprised by this because as a black man, they don't expect that I'd argue in favor of someone's right to discriminate but yes. If you want to discriminate, it should be legal BUT you have to face the consequences of that decision.

I suspect that the vast majority of the people I know, of all racial backgrounds, would refuse to do business with someone who mistreated me just as I would refuse to do business with someone who had mistreated them.

Being that this is AirBNB, a private entity, I like it. If you're going to discriminate, they will not do business with you.

The power of the Free Market at works.

LK

Comment We're not there yet but... (Score 1) 265

I was a kid when I saw the Terminator. It caused me to do a lot of thinking about autonomous weapons systems and the fear is completely justified.

The killing of human being should only be done BY human beings. There has to be some human cost to be paid by the killer. There are some things that a human being can flat out refuse to do.

Launch a missile at a parking lot full of baby strollers? No.

A machine will not question such an order and will do it without hesitation at the time or remorse later.

LK

Comment Re:Sour Grapes (Score 1) 87

Why are you using this dumbass expression?

I would suspect one of two reasons.

Either 1:
He isn't talking about just musicians. He's talking about musicians, authors and filmmakers.

Or 2:
He's doing whatever he can to avoid calling people like Young Thug, Kodak Black and Lil Uzi by the label "Artists".

LK

Comment Re: And the other end of the deal? (Score 1) 294

There is nothing inherent about women that would make them not work as hard as men. That's nonsense.

If you're talking about "putting forth as much effort", you're probably right but if you're talking about "able to perform as much physical labor in the same amount of time", you're definitely wrong.

Obviously there are individual women who are stronger than most men but on average men are stronger and can perform more physical labor.

It's not discrimination that lead to most loggers, miners and firefighters being male, it's biological differences.

There is some physical recovery for the woman after childbirth, especially depending on the method of delivery. However, the amount of leave goes beyond what's necessary for recovery.

They would probably just outright lose the employee if they didn't give what she deemed to be "Adequate" leave when a child is born. It's a compromise that employers make because it's better for them to wait a few additional weeks for the experienced employee to return than it is to hire and train a replacement.

LK

Comment Re:Big surprise some jackhole Silicon Valley (Score 2) 242

I can hear the 80s era commercial version of their service.

"Is that pesky first amendment getting in your way?
Is someone saying things about you that you don't like?
Did someone publicize something sleazy that you did but was recorded without your knowledge?

We can help. We'll sue them into oblivion and maybe get you some money in the process.

Call 1-800-SHYSTER
There's no fee unless WE get money for YOU!"

LK

Comment Re:NO FUCKING SHIT (Score 1) 183

For the purposes of commercial marketing, it's not incorrect.

Someone who is assigned a "Conservative" marketing profile is probably NOT going to read sponsored content from HuffPo while someone who is assigned a "Liberal" marketing profile is probably NOT going to read sponsored content from FreedomOutpost and if by chance they do, they're not going to patronize the advertisers of those sites.

Someone who reads content from across the spectrum just might look at content from either of those sources and probably won't penalize advertisers quite so much.

LK

Comment It's increasingly difficult to live off grid. (Score 1) 264

Places around the country have been criminalizing it. If you don't tie in to municipal utilities like water, sewage and electricity, they'll condemn your property and then arrest you for trespassing if you remain on it.

We need political solutions every bit as badly as technological ones.

LK

Comment Re:Don't Panic (Score 1) 535

"the pound is already re-stabilizing and didn't fall that far to start with!"

a) no it isn't
b) 10% isn't a big fall????

It's fallen to the lowest level since 1985. It's the 3rd largest currency fall ever, of any currency. It's twice the fall that happened on 'black wednesday' when we crashed out of the ERM - which caused a whopping recession and soaring interest rates.

The FTSE only stabilised after the Bank of England offered an extra £250 billion - yes, with a b - in liquidity to banks, who were amongst the hardest hit.

And that was ONE day of post referendum trading.

HSBC have said they will move at least 1000 jobs to the EU if the leave the single market. The rescue of Port Talbot - 11,000 jobs - is under threat as potential investors are backing out now due to Brexit. Tech, cars, financial services, and all other sorts companies that rely on exports to the EU are all looking at if they'll be better off in Ireland or Scotland (assuming it leaves the UK) to stay inside the EU single market.

The bonfire of the UK economy has literally only just started. Petrol is going up next week due to the sterling crash, electricity & gas prices will follow, and food prices will be going up soon - we import 40% of it.

Comment Re:Why has perl6 flopped? (Score 1) 281

Strange, I could have sworn that I replied to this with a very detailed and lengthy response... urg.

Anyway, upshot is this: Perl 6 hasn't yet had a chance to flop. It was released in beta in December of last year and continues to make steady progress. Users are checking it out slowly, but I don't expect a landslide migration. P6 will have to prove itself as a language.

Comment Re:Why has perl6 flopped? (Score 1) 281

I won't say, "I don't think it has," because it demonstrably has not.

The language has been released in open beta. It still has many properties that I think chase away those who approach it outside of language research communities. As a Perl 5 nostalgia fix, the learning curve is just too daunting, so as the beta progresses, I expect it to continue to build its own base of enthusiasts, the same way Perl did when it was first released.

So the language has not "flopped" yet because it hasn't had a chance to succeed yet.

It took Perl many years to go from a small toy that a trivial number of Usenet enthusiasts had heard of to a standard part of the Unix and Unix-like toolset. I don't think Perl 6 will gain traction any faster, especially given the learning curve. That's not flopping.

However, it has some substantial advantages over other languages. High on that list is the trivial nature of slinging highly functional grammars as first-class objects. That's something that you just can't do as easily in any other language that I know of. Perl 5 parsers and those of many other high level languages have some pretty severe performance penalties; yacc and its kin aren't dynamic enough; the various parser generators for Java are fast and mostly complete, but really painful to use.

Basically, you need a language that closely integrates grammars with the language itself in order gain the benefits of Perl 6. Here's and example parser I posted to reddit the other day:

https://www.reddit.com/r/perl6...

A few other notable things that I think will draw people in:

The generalization of operators over iterable sequences and the hyper-operator version of reduction are features that you're going to hear a lot more about, I suspect. Perhaps in Perl 6, perhaps in other languages that adopt these ideas. I'm especially stunned by the utility of hyper-method-invocation (foo>>.method) which dispatches a given method over any iterable sequence of objects (whether they are the same type or not).

Full macros have not yet landed, not least because we've never had a full understanding of what macros would be. We know that they need to operate on the ASTs that represent code, and all of the self-hosting properties necessary to support that are there, but the exact syntax and semantics that are most Perl-friendly haven't fully gelled, yet. Once they do, I think that every language to have true macros in the past (mostly Lisp variants) has demonstrated the power of this tool.

A few other languages auto-generate accessors for classes, but I find the way Perl 6 does it to be a substantial improvement on the field, and it really is a joy to use. I think others will feel the same.

Speaking of objects, role composition will take some time for people to get used to, but as in other languages that have had similar features, I think this will be critical to Perl 6's adoption.

There are dozens of smaller features that are just quality-of-life benefits ranging from lexical variable/named parameter passing to the way any block can be turned into an anonymous closure and even curried. Some of these will be important to some, but not to others. It will be interesting to see it play out.

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