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Comment Re:Don't Panic (Score 1) 535

"the pound is already re-stabilizing and didn't fall that far to start with!"

a) no it isn't
b) 10% isn't a big fall????

It's fallen to the lowest level since 1985. It's the 3rd largest currency fall ever, of any currency. It's twice the fall that happened on 'black wednesday' when we crashed out of the ERM - which caused a whopping recession and soaring interest rates.

The FTSE only stabilised after the Bank of England offered an extra £250 billion - yes, with a b - in liquidity to banks, who were amongst the hardest hit.

And that was ONE day of post referendum trading.

HSBC have said they will move at least 1000 jobs to the EU if the leave the single market. The rescue of Port Talbot - 11,000 jobs - is under threat as potential investors are backing out now due to Brexit. Tech, cars, financial services, and all other sorts companies that rely on exports to the EU are all looking at if they'll be better off in Ireland or Scotland (assuming it leaves the UK) to stay inside the EU single market.

The bonfire of the UK economy has literally only just started. Petrol is going up next week due to the sterling crash, electricity & gas prices will follow, and food prices will be going up soon - we import 40% of it.

Comment Re:Why has perl6 flopped? (Score 1) 281

Strange, I could have sworn that I replied to this with a very detailed and lengthy response... urg.

Anyway, upshot is this: Perl 6 hasn't yet had a chance to flop. It was released in beta in December of last year and continues to make steady progress. Users are checking it out slowly, but I don't expect a landslide migration. P6 will have to prove itself as a language.

Comment Re:Why has perl6 flopped? (Score 1) 281

I won't say, "I don't think it has," because it demonstrably has not.

The language has been released in open beta. It still has many properties that I think chase away those who approach it outside of language research communities. As a Perl 5 nostalgia fix, the learning curve is just too daunting, so as the beta progresses, I expect it to continue to build its own base of enthusiasts, the same way Perl did when it was first released.

So the language has not "flopped" yet because it hasn't had a chance to succeed yet.

It took Perl many years to go from a small toy that a trivial number of Usenet enthusiasts had heard of to a standard part of the Unix and Unix-like toolset. I don't think Perl 6 will gain traction any faster, especially given the learning curve. That's not flopping.

However, it has some substantial advantages over other languages. High on that list is the trivial nature of slinging highly functional grammars as first-class objects. That's something that you just can't do as easily in any other language that I know of. Perl 5 parsers and those of many other high level languages have some pretty severe performance penalties; yacc and its kin aren't dynamic enough; the various parser generators for Java are fast and mostly complete, but really painful to use.

Basically, you need a language that closely integrates grammars with the language itself in order gain the benefits of Perl 6. Here's and example parser I posted to reddit the other day:

https://www.reddit.com/r/perl6...

A few other notable things that I think will draw people in:

The generalization of operators over iterable sequences and the hyper-operator version of reduction are features that you're going to hear a lot more about, I suspect. Perhaps in Perl 6, perhaps in other languages that adopt these ideas. I'm especially stunned by the utility of hyper-method-invocation (foo>>.method) which dispatches a given method over any iterable sequence of objects (whether they are the same type or not).

Full macros have not yet landed, not least because we've never had a full understanding of what macros would be. We know that they need to operate on the ASTs that represent code, and all of the self-hosting properties necessary to support that are there, but the exact syntax and semantics that are most Perl-friendly haven't fully gelled, yet. Once they do, I think that every language to have true macros in the past (mostly Lisp variants) has demonstrated the power of this tool.

A few other languages auto-generate accessors for classes, but I find the way Perl 6 does it to be a substantial improvement on the field, and it really is a joy to use. I think others will feel the same.

Speaking of objects, role composition will take some time for people to get used to, but as in other languages that have had similar features, I think this will be critical to Perl 6's adoption.

There are dozens of smaller features that are just quality-of-life benefits ranging from lexical variable/named parameter passing to the way any block can be turned into an anonymous closure and even curried. Some of these will be important to some, but not to others. It will be interesting to see it play out.

Comment Re:Okay... so what am I supposed to do about it? (Score 1) 368

I happen to think that it's a scam.

It's only designed to punish more successful nations and help less successful ones.

Third world countries are already eating our lunch on the cost of labor but if you add in carbon taxation, it'll cause Third and First world nations to switch places on the economic scale.

LK

Comment Re:A question I keep asking that no one ever answe (Score 1) 241

Then they send you to prison for refusing to decrypt it?

See the UK for example - the RIP Act - where you can get a sentence of up to 2 years for failing to decrypt, when ordered, anything the police have a 'reasonable belief' that you have the keys to. Several animal rights' activists have already been convicted under this law.

Forget the password for that encrypted backup? Get sent an encrypted email you don't even have the key for? Have some file of randomly generated garbage you used to test drive throughput that might be mistaken for encrypted data? Better hope the police don't go looking for a reason to put you away...

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