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Comment Re:What's so "unreasonable"? (Score 1) 183

This actually happens in state government too - politicians or talk show hosts say the pension isn't viable (ie - they take in less than they have to pay out). You look at the data and its like yeah if every single employee retires right now this very second - no they cannot pay it all out, but the data overwhelmingly shows they can keep up with the rate of retirement.

I have no clue, but I'd guess that if everyone collecting a 401k (or a 403b if you are a gov employee) - retired today - it probably couldn't pay 100% of it out either. But that's not going to happen - you have to be 65 to even start collecting it.

I honestly think its just a way to screw over the rest of us still collecting a pension. So they can't just dissolve it with a pen, so what they do is start changing parameters on it enough until it screws over the entire organization and the people who paid into it (by law!).

Comment Not a chance (Score 1) 268

There is just about 0 chance that either Apple or Microsoft will produce even mostly open source operating systems.
I think the concept is so stupid that I'm more likely to ignore anything else he says, other than to respond:

"Use the best tool for the job. There is value added if you can read, modify, and fix tools that are open source, as is the great value of not being required to pay for it. If there is a closed source tool that is free, there is value in that as well. And if there is an expensive closed source tool that is a better value than others because it is much closer to what you need/want: Use that."

See? Easy.

Crime

Journalist Matthew Keys Sentenced To 24-Month Prison Term For Helping Anonymous (theverge.com) 99

An anonymous reader writes: The former Reuters journalist convicted last year for aiding the hacker group Anonymous has been sentenced to 24 months in prison today. Matthew Keys faced up to a possible 25 years for three counts of hacking. Keys will be on supervised release and he is set to surrender on June 15th. In October 2015, Keys was found guilty for violating the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act when he provided website login credentials to The Los Angeles Times, a Tribune Media-owned newspaper. In the past, he's worked for a companion Tribune property, KTXL Fox 40 in Sacramento, California, which gave him possession of the login information to the join content management system. As a result, Anonymous members altered one story on the Los Angeles Times website. He then went to work for Reuters, where he was fired from his position as social media editor after charges were filed in March 2013.

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