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Submission + - If you had to lecture on Cyber Terrorism 1

quantumghost writes: I have a high likelihood of presenting for a group of about 400 healthcare workers at a disaster preparedness conference next year. It is a 20 minute slot (and nothing more than a primer), but obviously, I want to capture their attention. I was thinking of working with the venue to set up a fake WiFi hotspot to capture those who randomly link to any hotspot, but how do I use that to full effect (e.g. anyone ever light up all their phones at once)? Or any suggestions about how to get their attention? Any topics that you think should be stressed? My plans for the talk will be about ransomware (and the need for backups), attacks on medical devices (hacking pacemakers, insulin pumps etc), (spear) phising attacks on providers/institutions, and awareness of social engineering — are there other topics that should be addressed?

Submission + - Terrifying anti-riot vehicle created to quash any urban disturbance (ibtimes.co.uk)

drunkdrone writes: A formidable remote-controlled anti-riot vehicle called the Bozena Riot has been designed to make light work of angry mobs with a giant expanding shield and packing an arsenal of crowd dispersal tools.

Built by Slovakian company Bozena, the high-tech security system keeps law enforcement units safe with its shock-absorbing barrier, which can be expanded out to 7.5 metres to protect 36 officers and features a rising platform to give riot police an elevated view of their surroundings and provide tactical advantage against aggressors.

The shield has ports for firing non-lethal projectiles and is equipped with tear gas guns to "guarantee control of crowds" when things get dicey. Mounted loudspeakers can be used either to issue instructions to officers or to appeal to crowds, and the vehicle can optionally be equipped with smoke grenade launchers and a radio jammer for blocking mobile communications.

Submission + - Why You Should Care About The Supreme Court Case On Toner Cartridges (consumerist.com)

rmdingler writes: A corporate squabble over printer toner cartridges doesn’t sound particularly glamorous, and the phrase “patent exhaustion” is probably already causing your eyes to glaze over. However, these otherwise boring topics are the crux of a Supreme Court case that will answer a question with far-reaching impact for all consumers: Can a company that sold you something use its patent on that product to control how you choose to use after you buy it?

Here’s the background: Lexmark makes printers. Printers need toner in order to print, and Lexmark also happens to sell toner.

Then there’s Impression Products, a third-party company makes and refills toner cartridges for use in printers, including Lexmark’s.

Comment Re: RICO (Score 2) 226

Problem is, RICO has long been abused. A law designed to stop the Mafia and similar criminal organizations has been used to smear political opponents, prosecute anti-abortion activists, and attack corporations over alleged collusion over 'climate change'.

It's also a favorite tool to employ when a prosecutor or law-enforcement agency wants to grab assets, under criminal AND civil forfeiture. . .

Submission + - SPAM: Soviet cover-up of nuclear fallout worse than Chernobyl

schwit1 writes: It was a nuclear disaster four times worse than Chernobyl in terms of the number of cases of acute radiation sickness, but Moscow’s complicity in covering up its effects on people’s health has remained secret until now.

We knew that in August 1956, fallout from a Soviet nuclear weapons test at Semipalatinsk in Kazakhstan engulfed the Kazakh industrial city of Ust-Kamenogorsk and put more than 600 people in hospital with radiation sickness, but the details have been sketchy.

After seeing a newly uncovered report, New Scientist can now reveal that a scientific expedition from Moscow in the aftermath of the hushed-up disaster uncovered widespread radioactive contamination and radiation sickness across the Kazakh steppes.

The scientists then tracked the consequences as nuclear bomb tests continued — without telling the people affected or the outside world.

The report by scientists from the Institute of Biophysics in Moscow was found in the archive of the Institute of Radiation Medicine and Ecology (IRME) in Semey, Kazakhstan. “For many years, this has been a secret,” says the institute’s director Kazbek Apsalikov, who found the report and passed it on to New Scientist.

More nuclear bomb tests were conducted at Semipalatinsk than anywhere else in the world during the 1950s and early 1960s. Western journalists have reported since the breakup of the Soviet Union on the apparent health effects on villagers downwind of the tests. And some recent studies have estimated radiation doses using proxies such as radioactivity in tooth enamel.

The newly revealed report, which outlines “the results of a radiological study of Semipalatinsk region” and is marked “top secret”, shows for the first time just how much Soviet scientists knew at the time about the human-health disaster and the extent of the cover-up.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - SPAM: Modified Gravity vies with Planet9 to explain Solar system structure- and fails.

RockDoctor writes: One of the serious contenders to the majority opinion Matter/ Dark Matter/ Dark Energy hypothesis for explaining the structure of the universe is the "MOdified Newtonian Dynamics" or MOND hypothesis in which the gravity field strength decreases not according to a 1/(radius^2) factor, but according to some other function of (radius), which would then explain the movements ("Dynamics") of galaxy-scale structures — the original evidence for postulating the existence of Dark Matter. This hypothesis dates back to 1983 — before the observations that prompt the Dark Energy hypothesis — and has been championed mainly (but not only) by physicist Mordehai Milgrom. While it is definitely not "mainstream" physics, it is certainly a respectable hypothesis.

One way to look for MOND effects is to look closely at the outer Solar system, where distances are larger than can be examined on Earth, but things are close enough for small effects to be measurable from Earth. And in a new paper published on Arxiv, people have done just that. The known "Extreme Trans-Neptunian Objects" ("ETNO"s — closest separation from Sol outside Neptune's orbit ; furthest separation 150 ~ 1500 AU) are closely clustered in direction — the evidence that Batygin, Brown, Sheppard and Trujillo have used in the last five years as evidence for a ninth planet in the Solar system. (No, Pluto is not a planet. Unless you want it to be about 10th or 11th in a 100+ planetary system.) It was possible that the MOND hypothesis might explain the orientation of the ETNOs, so the idea has been examined in detail (paper) — and found it less than 1% likely to explain the observations.

MOND remains an attractive type of hypothesis to explain the observational evidence of the universe's structure without postulating major changes in our understanding of physics. But again, it has failed at the test of new data types. Which still leaves physics with no viable alternative to the Matter / Dark Matter/ Dark Energy hypothesis.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Fathers 'afraid to ask for flexible working' (bbc.co.uk)

AmiMoJo writes: Dads who want to be more involved in the care of their children fear that asking for more flexible hours might damage their careers. Such requests can even lead to employers questioning their workers' commitment. Research suggests 44% of dads have lied about family-related responsibilities. The UK government forecasts that between only 2% and 8% of eligible fathers will take up Shared Parental Leave.

Submission + - EFF needs your help to stop Congress dismantling Internet privacy protections! (eff.org)

Peter Eckersley writes: Last year the FCC passed rules forbidding ISPs (both mobile and landline) from using your personal data without your consent for purposes other than providing you Internet access. In other words, the rules prevent ISPs from turning your browsing history into a revenue stream to sell to marketers and advertisers. Unfortunately, members of Congress are scheming to dismantle those protections as early as this week. If they succeed, ISPs would be free to resume selling users' browsing histories, pre-loading phones with spyware, and generally doing all sorts of creepy things to your traffic.

The good news is, we can stop them. We especially need folks in the key states of Alaska, Colorado, Maine, Montana, Nevada, Ohio, and Pennsylvania to call their senators this week and tell them not to kill the FCC's Broadband Privacy Rules.

Together, we can stop Congress from undermining these crucial privacy protections.

Submission + - Trump Is Weeks Away From Missing His Chance to Reform Work Visas (bloomberg.com)

pteddy writes: We haven't heard much from Trump or Congress on the issue of H1-B reform lately. As Bloomberg points out time is running out:

President Donald Trump and Congress have said they want to overhaul policies that allow companies to bring employees from overseas to the U.S. But the application deadline for the most controversial visa program is the first week of April, which means new rules have to be in place for that batch of applicants or another year's worth of visas will be handed out under the existing guidelines. The current H-1B visa program has been criticized for hurting American workers and undercutting salaries.


Comment Oh frabjous. . . . (Score 2) 73

. . . . now, instead of MANUALLY getting spammed for GenericCo's latest Miracle Product, now they'll systematize it.

LinkedIn will become even LESS useful to the typical professional. At this rate, it'll be all sales types and keyword-spamming recruiters in a few years. . .

Hint: not EVERY transaction or networking event has to be pointed towards sales or recruiting, but that does seem to be the way LinkedIn is developing. . .

Submission + - How H-1B Visas Are Being Used to Replace American Workers (numbersusa.com)

walterbyrd writes: According to 60 Minutes investigation:

When confronted with the tech companies’ argument that they cannot find enough qualified American workers the former Congressman replied, “there are a lot of qualified American workers, but the companies will do better financially if they hire the foreign worker rather than the Americans.”

Submission + - How the Internet Gave Mail-Order Brides the Power (backchannel.com)

mirandakatz writes: For decades, the mail-order bride system in the Philippines went something like this: Western men picked Filipinas out of catalogues, and the women had little to no information about the men they were agreeing to marry. The internet has changed all of that. As Meredith Talusan reports at Backchannel, technology has empowered Filipinas to be choosy about the Western men they pursue—and indeed, when it comes to online dating, they now hold much of the power. As Talusan writes, "in one sense, the leveling of dating power between Filipinas and Westerners is the fulfillment of the global internet’s promise to equalize relations between disparate places and people. Yet even as Filipinas and Westerners face off as equals online, the world of dating exposes the ultimate limitations of the web."

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