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Comment LTE takes after GSM on the insecurity tree (Score 1) 79

GSM was full of holes and worthless and now its direct descendant LTE has similar holes. WHAT A SURPRISE.

And of course the industry rubbed their hands about the GSM issues and they will do so again about LTE. Everyone has spent too much money on this shit to go back now and fix it.

Apple had some major issues with their early iPhone security because they were of course GSM-only for a long time and any competitor who wanted to listen in on test calls or record everything only needed to setup a GSM eavesdropping station, would would fit in a briefcase and could be run from a car in the parking lot, and they'd have the whole thing. I have no doubt that happened. And now, it will with LTE too.

The presentation was by a woman, too. The world has changed, basement dwellers.

Comment Re:What impresses me is that it's electric (Score 1) 88

No. Multiple companies have electric planes in the works. One powered by the sun flew around the world. Airbus has several different concepts in the works.

It's not really novel anymore and nobody has proven it's practical for a mass production. Normal aviation powerplants need to be lightweight and powerful which are not things easily achieved with current batteries and electric motors.

Comment Re:It's cool. It's also going to be a while. (Score 1) 88

None of these concepts solve the problem of utility lines. A LOT of streets are criss-crossed with the damn things and none of it is on maps.

One advantage of airports is that they don't have overhead wires all over the place. And one advantage of regular cars is that they don't need to care about overhead wires, which is great, because cities and utility companies love stringing crap everywhere and making it all into an eyesore.

Comment This is mostly a Red Herring (Score 5, Interesting) 428

Fingerprints are an inherently insecure way to 'secure' a device of any kind because there are techniques to obtain latent fingerprints, which we all leave everywhere anyway, and use them to make a replica fingerprint which will open devices, security doors, phones, whatever, which is supposedly secured by said prints.

If you secure anything with fingerprints as your sole method of security, you have accepted having no security. It's a really bad way to secure anything unless you just don't care.

A normal search warrant already gives the police the right to obtain those latent prints and, hell, make you submit to fingerprinting on the old ink pad or the new electronic scanners. The same warrant also gives them the right to seize the devices that they wish to open.

Apparently the cops think they don't have the right to go through the steps to make a replica print and get the device to open. They are manufacturing something rather than just looking at the evidence. Personally I don't see a hill of difference here between that need and a police raid that seizes a padlocked box for which the police are unable to find a key. They would get a locksmith to open it, or more likely, cut the lock. So you have a locked phone. Make a replica print. Done.

This fingerprint warrant just sounds like they didn't want to spend time on doing it the hard way. Or they were after something else.

Comment Meaningless without population curbs (Score 1) 904

Make no mistake: there IS a coming job crisis as we continue to replace people with automation. The lower end of jobs will be hit especially hard by this, deeply affecting people who already had few job options anyway. Left unchecked, that is a recipei for civil unrest and riots and mass numbers of youth have nothing else to do and no hope. The UK saw riots like that in the 80s. It's bad.

The writing is on the wall that this is going to happen in the US. Now the question is, does the US owe these people anything? Is it society's problem when there are far fewer minimum wage jobs? Traditionally the answer is no. But these kids will have no hope and absolutely nothing to lose by going on rampages and stealing what they can't afford to buy. It may end up being the worst period of civil unrest in American history and we can see it coming now. Do we say this is not society's problem and do nothing, or do we do what we can to mitigate this disaster before it gets out of control? Citizens will demand the future government DO SOMETHING. We have time now to keep it from getting that bad. We can probably do more now than we will be able to do in 20 years. But do we have the will? I doubt it.

Universal Income, or whatever it will be called, is an interesting idea but the fatal flaw with it is that as long as people keep having kids and we still allow immigration, then there will always be more and more and more and more people who want the money.

Eventually there won't be enough money to pay for this and we have living examples of what happens. Several towns in New England had very generous benefits for unemployed, the poor, etc. The few local people making use of these benefits were cared for thanks to the generosity of the towns, who assumed they would only ever need to support a few such beneficiaries. Things were fine.

But word got out about how amazing things were in these towns, how you could get money and food and a free place to stay, etc. and more and more indigents and especially foreign refugees began arriving in those towns having travelled there specifically to acquire the benefits. The towns suddenly became burdened with dozens and dozens and then hundreds of people in need and the entire towns were destroyed economically from trying to keep up with their commitment to the poor.

So if we adopt a national benefit, then the birthrate alone is going to bankrupt the country (nevermind that we're always on deficit spending anyway so we are already technically bankrupt). Minority groups already have much higher birthrates than the traditional caucasian groups so the country will continue toward "the browning of America" as some have called it with more and more people born every year. So the universal income would balloon out of control right away.

This is going to be a challenging period for the USA. I probably won't live to see how bad things get. THAT is the only thing I am happy about.

Comment Mom wants her basement back (Score 1) 475

How do we know it wasn't Ecuador who cut him off? Maybe they are sick of being used as a tool for this guy, who, instead of acting like he wants asylum, is busy actively conducting various ongoing activities that are considered crimes in many countries?

He's afraid of being extradited? Well duh. The rape charge is one thing. He needs to man up and deal with it. But all the OTHER shit he's pulled is not excused because of his fear of being held accountable.

Why DOES he have all this freedom to break more laws? Why does he think he is above the law? And since he acts that way, dragging Ecuador along with him, why should they keep supporting him? He's a bully and a criminal hiding behind the generosity of his hosts. Even if they continue to allow him to live there, nobody ever said he had to have all the accoutrements of a normal life. He could be given a closet to live in and scraps of food and if he does not like it, he can leave. Hell, I would throw a mop at him and make him earn his keep. Janitor Julian. Piso Mojado, my friend.

Just like mom says, if you want to stay at home, you are going to do chores and you are going to behave. If you don't like it, get a job and move out. Nobody is stopping you.

Comment Now fix co=mingling! (Score 5, Interesting) 77

Since Amazon has clearly clobbered the bogeyman of honest reviews in exchange for a discount, maybe now they can DO something about the fraud that is co-mingling.

For those not up to speed, co-mingling takes place when various suppliers all certify they have x number of identical products and they ship these items to Amazon who then holds them for fulfillment. As far as Amazon is concerned, the items supplied by Larry are the same as those supplied by Sara so the items get pooled together and orders are filled by whichever one makes sense to Amazon.

The problem is, a LOT of vendors are faking it, certifying other products are the same or supplying counterfeit versions. Suppose you order a bottle of Coke. Larry and Sara both sell Coke on Amazon and both of them ship the bottles to Amazon and Amazon then fills the orders. But Sara hasn't supplied a REAL Coke, no she's sent in some store brand drink.

You order a Coke on Amazon from Larry's store. Amazon says well, we have 15 Cokes in stock, and Larry's are the same as Sara's so we'll send you one from Sara's supply since it's closer to you. Your Coke arrives and you spew it all over the place when it turns out to be store brand and not the real Coke. So you leave a bad review! Larry has shipped you fake coke and he's cheating! His reputation takes a pounding and he doesn't even know why.

Larry is then put in the spot of trying to make things right with you even though HIS Cokes were fine and it was Amazon who shipped you the fake one. Amazon does zero policing to validate products are what they say, so Sara gets away with it.

This sort of fraud is happening all the time now. Legit vendors are faced with bad reviews for fake products they didn't supply, but they have to turn around and make the customer happy or else Amazon penalizes them for negative reviews and bad feedback.

The fake suppliers don't care because they don't get caught very often and even if they do, they just toss the account and make a new one, and of course they never had legit merchandise to sell anyway so any sales that DO take place stand odds to be fulfilled with the real merchandise.

Amazon is doing nothing to fix this and thousands of honest vendors are being slammed with bad reviews about fake or counterfeit or dangerous products that got co-mingled into the system.

Comment Re:I hope this helps (Score 1) 77

Co-mingling of goods was already a huge issue Amazon is doing nothing to fix it.

But god forbid somebody get a discount to do a review. Oh no, can't have that.

Here's the thing: the people doing those reviews are at least incentivized to do a review. The co-minglers, on the other hand, are already up to fraud the moment they start.

Comment Value = zero (Score 1) 51

Something is worth what someone is willing to pay. That's all.

For something like this, if one group stole it, then another group can also steal it and not pay a dime. You can't sell something if your buyer can obtain it for free. Why would they pay? Makes no sense.

Anyway, I would not want anything to do with this stuff. Somebody ELSE can find out if it's a honey pot and somebody ELSE can stick their finger up the NSA's butt hole and make them mad. Making the NSA mad at you is not a game.

Comment Re:Why does anyone update? (Score 1) 172

This. The update went fine on all of my computers that touch the internet or do internety things. Hooray for security patches. But the update failed on one PC that happens to do nothing more than run security cameras and record video. Nobody uses it for surfing or any other work. So the broken update is of no consequence on any PC where it would matter.

ymmv but I'm not losing sleep on it.

Comment Re: So what's the story? (Score 1) 80

Wake me up when any of these bloggers demonstrate ethics. They're FAR too interested in posting things meant to gain clicks and ethics is somewhere down the ladder below "feed the dog" in terms of importance.

Not only that but they tend to be PROUD of not having to act like real journalists with sources and confirmations and ethics and an editor to answer to. None of that stuff matters or has ever mattered to most bloggers, and yet they demand press credentials to events and get them, companies like Apple shower them in invites and free review samples and treat them occasionally to travel costs and meals and even stipends. All the while, they run around acting like they have a better grasp on things than "real" journalists for traditional media outlets.

It's all bullshit. There are SO many kickbacks and spiffs and freebies flowing, it has spawned hundreds of bloggers and Youtubers and Twitchers many of who are in it for the free shit they can snag and the ego kick from having people read and click.

Comment Re:Don't rush to conclusion (Score 1) 84

It's easy to bash the incumbents but let's not just hand the keys to the city over to Google just yet.

They're not handing over the keys. OTMR is a normal part of wiring poles. It happens ALL the time. Google is asking for something that Comcast and AT&T themselves use in other areas for the same reasons: OTMR works and everybody wins.

Unless you are an AT&T or Comcast and you don't want a competitor coming in. Then suddenly it becomes a big deal.

Comment Drastic must have special meaning in Tenn (Score 1) 84

OTMR is done ALL the time, all over the US and probably in other countries. It's not drastic. It's NORMAL.

You know, a word that means the opposite of drastic. Normal. A word that means, well, normal.

AT&T and Comcast NORMALLY have little to no problem with OTMR except well, in this case, a competitor they don't want is the one who needs to do a lot of OTMR. And then suddenly the thing everybody has done for years is drastic.

Riiiight. Nothing fishy going in here. They just, you know, faxed it over, while the rep was out of town. Perfectly drastic. I mean, normal.

Comment Re:Two thoughts (Score 1) 73

How and why Star Trek did what it did was a LOT more complicated than simply beaming onto whatever miscellaneous set was available, as you state.

Go read the "These Are the Voyages" books. Even the free sample from Amazon will do.

Star Trek had almost nothing to work with and no budget and went to extremes to make the show look as good as they could. Sometimes they failed but a lot or times they succeeded. I never much cared for the old show but having now read how they did it and why, and how much genius went into simple things like lighting a set... it's completely different now.

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