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Comment You moved the goal posts (Score 5, Insightful) 251

It isn't a false equivalence: instead, you moved the goal posts.

First, we made fun of those nations because the government spied on everyone.
Now we spy on everyone.
So in response, we changed the argument. We claim that it was never really the spying that was the problem, it was that they were blocking free speech.
Next, we block free speech.
Then we can change the argument again: It wasn't the blocking of speech that was the problem, it was that they jailed people and held them without charges.

In the US, we've been playing this game for decades:

We now have a special jail where we can hold people without charges (Guantanamo Bay).
But we can move the goal posts again. We still aren't as bad as those other guys, because they do it on their own soil!
We used to make fun of Russia for requiring paperwork to travel, now we require it.
But it wasn't the paperwork that was the problem! It was that they had special "watch lists." Now we have them.
But it wasn't the watch lists that were the problem! It was that they had to all be personally inspected in order to travel. Well now we do to.

As you can see, we have already gone down the slippery slope, we merely hide it by moving the goal posts. Eventually, the next generation will grow-up expecting this kind of stuff, having never known what it was like to be free. If you find yourself saying "well, we are nothing like place XXXX" then you should pause, reflect, and see if this is the same standard you applied a decade ago.

Comment Re:Cadmium based LEDs (Score 3, Interesting) 46

Your experience with OLED seems to match the theory. Blue degrades fastest. Some causes of degredation are proportional to usage, while some are not. As a counterexample however, I have a 2.5-year-old Samsung Galaxy S5, which uses "Super AMOLED", with no noticeable degradation so far. Unsurprisingly, the OLED association claims that OLED lifespan is as good or better than LCD. Wikipedia implies that too, but it sounds like it depends on exactly how it is constructed.

Comment Yes, and I'm Rick James, b*itch! (Score 5, Interesting) 471

Trump is a brilliant improviser. One way to redirect criticism is to accept the criticism, and spin it as though it agreed with you. I actually took a course on collaboration in a corporate environment that talks about this. Their idea was not to use it to spin things though, but to keep people open to ideas. Instead of saying "no, you are wrong because" you say "yes, and..." elaborate on how you will address the problem. Trump takes this to the next level.

Trump: "I'm going to build a wall"
The world: "That's ridiculous, that will cost 5 billions of dollars!"
Trump: "My wall idea is soo ridiculous, it will cost 10 billion dollars!"
The world: "We can't afford that."
Trump: "So I'll have somebody else pay for it!"

Trump: "I'm going to build iPhones in America."
The world: "That will cost too much."
Trump: "Yeah! They will cost so much that we will have to construct robots to build the phones!"
The world: "But if robots build them, that won't employ workers."
Trump: "My robots will be so awesome that they will cook breakfast for the workers!"

Sometimes I want him to say "Because I'm Donald Trump, bitch" in the same voice that Dave Chapelle used when he said "'Cuz I'm Rick James, bitch!"

Irony: One reason you can build iPhones cheaply in China is because Chinese workers don't get the kinds of protections and rights that US workers do. That was part of the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP): to raise the worker protections in China to level the playing field. Trump is doing the opposite. He says regulations will be removed in the US. So instead of raising worker protections for Chinese workers, it sounds like he is going to remove protections from US workers. And ironically, the blue-collar workers voted for this.

Comment Re:Commute Chelsea Manning's sentence (Score 2) 534

Why does Chelsea Manning deserve a pardon?

Snowden leaked information about an illegal NSA program. He released the information to several high-class American newspapers in the hopes that they would filter it appropriately. What he released caused material changes to public policy. He may darn well deserve whistle-blower protection for that. Unfortunately, Snowden also leaked a bunch of stuff that was totally legal that the NSA did, just to shame them into paying attention to him. This leaves his status as a potential whistle-blower in a more dubious position.

Chelsea Manning just grabbed every random document he/she had access to and sent them, unfiltered, to a foreign national. Foreign diplomats now hold-back from talking to US diplomats out of fear of their confidential communications being leaked. No public policy changes were made as result of those leaks. What did Manning do that makes him/her a whistle-blower?

I see a big difference between the actions of these two people.

Comment Re:Ideally a manifest/profile from IoT makers... (Score 2) 230

I do not understand the questions. I will try to answer.

But how would that work for devices that aren't tied to a specific service?

Any labeling system has standard lingo. When labeling food for example, vitamin content is listed as a % of the estimated daily value required for an average adult. Protein however is listed in grams. Terms such as "Yellow #5" are standardized. The same would happen when labeling your speakers. When a device is listening, we would need to have a term for "I listen on all IPV4 addresses" and "I listen on the local IP multicast address." If you've ever written socket code, there are already standards for these. We would need other standard terminology for payloads.

When you open the box, you would see a little piece of paper that says "This wifi speaker system communicates on the following protocols:"
IP4ANY | RTCP+TCP/UDP | 554 - 556 | LAN realtime streaming service for receiving audio; PCM audio data, device name, model number
*.spotify.com | HTTPS+TCP | 443 | Internet streaming service for receiving audio; PCM audio data, device name, model number
*.manufacturer.com | HTTPS+TCP | 443 | Firmware update service; sends model number, firmware version, device name, last update date

Hopefully it would not say:
*.centralmonitoringservice.cn | HTTP+TCP | 80 | Remote video monitoring and tunneling service; sends video, wifi password, user name, email address, device name

And the OP was saying this information is also coded into the device, in some standard machine-readable way.

If i cut them off from the internet then they simply don't work. I'd have to manually identify every IP that spotify uses and there seem to be a lot of them

This is where I am confused. Why would you need to do that?

My interpretation of what mlts proposed is kinda like what UPnP does. Today, UPnP already has a way for a device to request that the firewall open a port. I don't think it is super broadly used because security wasn't really considered when UPnP was designed. It is part of why some people just universally turn off UPnP on their routers. But my knowledge may be totally out of date. I didn't interpret mlts to be saying that all outgoing communication was turned off by default, and that the owner of the firewall would need to manually whitelist sites. That would be secure, and you could certainly do that today, but that won't be convenient for the end-user. One could certainly make a "friendlier" firewall that made this a bit easier, kinda like how personal firewall software works. "Hey, device WIFI_CAMERA_1234 wants to talk to nsa.trustme.cn. Allow Y/N?" :-)

Comment Re:Ideally a manifest/profile from IoT makers... (Score 5, Insightful) 230

I love that idea! It's like FDA labeling laws, but for electronics. It would be totally cheap for the manufacturer to do, and it would make it totally transparent as to which devices are total crap. And if they lie, they could be liable for it at LEAST under false advertising laws. Now that you say this -- why the heck haven't we done this before? It seems so simple and obvious.

This device communicates on the following protocols:
IP address | Protocol | Destination
.
.
.

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