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Comment Re: oh, yes (Score 1) 133

The polls say otherwise...

Hillary is supposed to be running against the anti-Christ but she seems to be barely scraping by. Perhaps she shouldn't say Trump's name so much. That's a pretty rookie mistake for politics.

DNC arrogance and incompetence is far more of an influence on this election than Putin.

Comment Re:Superdistribution of Content (Score 1) 183

Generally it's from some stupid millennial, or the mouthpiece of a social networking company that offers a messaging feature that, for all intents and purposes, is email (except with centralization, censorship, advertising and data-mining). What they really mean is "we wish email were dead, so everyone would be forced to become one of our users and we could become the new defacto email".

FTFY.

Comment Re:In other words (Score 1) 66

limited participation blockchain is redundant because the trust is already established by the exclusivity of the system.

Imagine that not all of the participants turn out to be honest. Or, imagine this is finance, and 0% of the participants are honest.

Majority-signing works well when the majority are honest, even if a substantial minority are not. It also works well when everyone is dishonest, but very unlikely to collude. This is solving a different problem than Bitcoin tries to solve. This is an implementation of "mutual auditing", not an alternative currency.

The thing that establishes trust on bitcoin is that no one miner can easily own a large portion of the compute power on the system,

Perhaps. I think it's possible the NSA has the compute power to take over bitcoin, After all the NSA had "ASIC miners" for at least 7 years before BTC existed. (You don't think the NSA published SHA-2 before they had ASICs, do you?)

Comment Re:Not a bad guess (Score 1) 143

Human population has expanded tremendously in the last part of those 800,000 years, and all of us consume oxygen.

It's worth remembering that Earth's total biomass is:
* 99.9% Prokaryote bacteria
* 0.1% Other (mostly plankton)

The tiny remainder that's not bacteria or plankton is mostly fish. Humans, sure, are reasonably successful within what's left over, but so are cattle, termites, ants, and krill.

Comment Re:Why do people care... (Score 1) 80

If a person wants or expects privacy, I believe that the onus is upon them to take measures to sufficient degree

They do. They beat the crap out of glassholes. Sufficient measures thus taken, effective privacy is restored.

)there's no rational basis to be worried about it

Says you. Most people see it differently.

When I want privacy, I go somewhere private. I step outside, however... and it's fair game.

Says you. Most people see it differently.

Comment Re:In other words (Score 2) 66

In other words: They are doing something completely different, but still call it "blockchain" because that's the current buzzword.

A blockchain with limited participants is still a blockchain. It's as trustworthy as those participants. If the participants all trust one another, or trust the system to protect them from the others, it serves its purpose, even if they are in fact pathologically lying shitsacks like financial companies.

I'm dubious of the "editing", but if it's really just new records that say "this record replaces record XYZ", i.e., it's still write-only except by convention, that's fine too.

Reminds be a bit of what "cloud" should have stood for until it became a generic moniker for simple online storage.

Not sure what you mean here. Sure lots of marketeers talk about "stored in the cloud", but most often that does mean "stored with AWS or Azure, behind the scenes". And there's plenty of "cloud computing" too: more and more distributed scientific jobs are moving that way, as well as naturally-distributed work like animation rendering. Heck, it's the new fad for small software companies to build and test jobs in the cloud.

Comment Not a bad guess (Score 1) 143

Human population has expanded tremendously in the last part of those 800,000 years, and all of us consume oxygen. It probably can't explain the first 700,000 years, though, since total global hominid population was probably fairly constant, with one species supplanting another.
But what about methane? We know it leaks from places like hydrate ices underwater, especially when there is an earthquake and landslide, and of course since it exists underground as natural gas, we know it can leak from there, too, if an earthquake happens to rupture the ground enough. Methane is a light gas that will rise toward the stratosphere, and likely react in the ozone layer. I'm talking about a long term slow thing, not fast enough to deplete ozone as fast as solar ultraviolet makes more from atmospheric oxygen. But the reaction produces water and CO2, and takes oxygen out of the air.

Comment Re: The U.S. ain't perfect, but... (Score 1) 522

That's one side's view, yes - there are differing accounts. You might want to read up more on the prelude to that battle. Workers had already been killed in previous clashes. The situation should never have been escalated like that - sending in hundreds of men with guns all but guaranteed further deaths.

Comment Re:Am I reading this right? (Score 1) 70

The weird thing, if it is the COPVs, is... there was so much attention focused on them after CRS-7. It'd be weird if this was the cause. And extremely frustrating, too, as they're not manufactured in-house. SpaceX surely tests the tanks, so they too would bear some responsibility for it getting past their test procedures, if this is the cause. Personally (as I mentioned elsewhere in the comments), having a composite vessel sitting in liquid oxygen always strikes me as a dangerous situation to begin with.... if we were good at maintaining LOX-composite compatibility, we'd be making the stages themselves out of composites rather than aluminum.

Of course, the COPVs aren't the only part of the "helium pressurization system". Still concerning that whatever it was slipped past them.

Comment Re:Huh. (Score 3, Interesting) 70

The helium isn't used for cooling; it's a pressurant. It's lower mass to make a small COPV and have that store your pressurant in it than to have the whole LOX tank be strong enough to withstand the pressure.

It's always bothered me, the concept of having a COPV sitting around in LOX, though. Ignoring the thermal cycling, LOX and epoxy aren't exactly fast friends. We don't make LOX tanks out of composites because composites tend to become impact sensitive in LOX (there've been some attempts, but it's still an active reseach field, not a "solved problem"). Not sure there's that much difference between making your whole tank out of composites vs. having a composite tank inside of one. I don't know what SpaceX does, if anything, to try to protect them, but the general concept has always concerned me.

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