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Submission + - Colors help set body's internal clock (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: The beautiful color of a sunset might be more than just a pretty picture. It could be a signal to our bodies that it’s time to reset our internal clock, the biological ticktock that governs everything from sleep patterns to digestion. That’s the implication of a new study in mice that shows these small rodents use light’s changing color to set their own clocks, a finding that researchers expect will hold for humans, too.

Submission + - Resistance to antibiotics found in isolated Amazonian tribe (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: When scientists first made contact with an isolated village of Yanomami hunter-gatherers in the remote mountains of the Amazon jungle of Venezuela in 2009, they marveled at the chance to study the health of people who had never been exposed to Western medicine or diets. But much to their surprise, these Yanomami’s gut bacteria have already evolved a diverse array of antibiotic-resistance genes, according to a new study, even though these mountain people had never ingested antibiotics or animals raised with drugs. The find suggests that microbes have long evolved the capability to fight toxins, including antibiotics, and that preventing drug resistance may be harder than scientists thought.

Submission + - Why the Myers-Briggs Test is Totally Meaningless (vox.com) 1

tazbert writes: At one time, it seemed like every employee I talked with knew whether they were an "ENFJ", "INTP", or one of the other Myers-Briggs personality types. I never questioned the efficacy of using these categories to guide my interactions with my co-workers. Now, after reading this article, I wonder if it made any difference. Are companies really still using this as a valid tool?

Submission + - Voting industry pushes online voting with assist from the Pentagon 1

Presto Vivace writes: As states warm to online voting, experts warn of trouble ahead

WASHINGTON — A Pentagon official sat before a committee of the Washington State Legislature in January and declared that the U.S. military supported a bill that would allow voters in the state to cast election ballots via email or fax without having to certify their identities.

What could possibly go wrong>

Submission + - Leaked Sony Contract Reveals Hollywood's Netflix Geo-Blocking Requirements (michaelgeist.ca)

An anonymous reader writes: Michael Geist has uncovered Hollywood's geo-blocking requirements that imposes on Netflix in its content licensing agreements. Included with the Sony documents posted by Wikileaks, the contractual provision requires Netflix to use geo-blocking technologies. However, it is only required to target VPNs and anonymizers that "have been created for the primary intent of bypassing geo-restrictions." Moreover, Sony was forced to admit that "geolocation and geofiltering technologies may in some cases be circumvented by highly proficient and determined individuals or organizations."

Submission + - The Hidden FM Radio Inside Your Pocket (npr.org)

mr crypto writes: Data providers would probably prefer you not know that most smart phones contain an FM chip that lets you listen to broadcasts for free: "But the FM chip is not activated on two-thirds of devices. That's because mobile makers have the FM capability switched off." The National Association of Broadcasters, National Public Radio, and American Public Media — have launched a lobbying campaign to get those radios switched on.

Submission + - FBI Accuses Researcher of Hacking Plane, Seizes Equipment (securityledger.com)

chicksdaddy writes: The Feds are listening and they really can't take a joke. That's the apparent moral of security researcher Chris Roberts' legal odyssey on Wednesday, which saw him escorted off a plane in Syracuse by two FBI agents and questioned for four hours over a humorous tweet Roberts posted about his ability to hack into the cabin control systems of the Boeing 737 he was flying.(https://twitter.com/Sidragon1/status/588433855184375808) Roberts (aka @sidragon1), joked that he could "start playing with EICAS messages," a reference to the Engine Indicating and Crew Alerting System (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Engine-indicating_and_crew-alerting_system).

Roberts was traveling to Syracuse to give a presentation. He said local law enforcement and FBI agents boarded the plane on the tarmac and escorted him off. He was questioned for four hours, with officers alleging they had evidence he had tampered with in-flight systems on an earlier leg of his flight from Colorado to Chicago.

In an interview with The Security Ledger (https://securityledger.com/2015/04/hacker-on-a-plane-fbi-seizes-researchers-gear/), Roberts said the agents questioned him about his tweet and whether he tampered with the systems on the United flight -something he denies doing.

Roberts had been approached earlier by the Denver office of the FBI which warned him away from further research on airplanes. The FBI was also looking to approach airplane makers Boeing and Airbus and wanted him to rebuild a virtualized environment he built to test airplane vulnerabilities to verify what he was saying.

Roberts refused, and the FBI seized his encrypted laptop and storage devices and has yet to return them, he said. The agents said they wished to do a forensic analysis of his laptop. Roberts said he declined to provide that information and requested a warrant to search his equipment. As of Friday, Roberts said he has not received a warrant.

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