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Comment Re: Has the dark web shrunk 85%? (Score 1) 107

If you believe that TOR is not compromised, then you should read this excerpt from this article in WIRED magazine...there are similar stories from many other outlets as well.

"The Feds Would Rather Drop a Child Porn Case Than Give Up a Tor Exploit

The Department of Justice filed a motion in Washington State federal court on Friday to dismiss its indictment against a child porn site. It wasn’t for lack of evidence; it was because the FBI didn’t want to disclose details of a hacking tool to the defense as part of discovery. Evidence in United States v. Jay Michaud hinged at least in part on information federal investigators had gathered by exploiting a vulnerability in the Tor anonymity network.

“Because the government remains unwilling to disclose certain discovery related to the FBI’s deployment of a ‘Network Investigative Technique’ (‘NIT’) as part of its investigation into the Playpen child pornography site, the government has no choice but to seek dismissal of the indictment,” federal prosecutor Annette Hayes wrote in the court filing on Friday. She noted that the DoJ’s work to resist disclosing the NIT was part of “an effort to balance the many competing interests that are at play when sensitive law enforcement technology becomes the subject of a request for criminal discovery.”

In other words, the feds are letting an alleged child pornographer free so that officials can potentially catch other dark-web using criminals in the future."

https://www.wired.com/2017/03/...

Comment This has nothing to do with the original article! (Score 1) 116

The former Conservative government decided that for the second largest country by area, it would be a good idea to centralize all Information Technology services, and called it Shared Services Canada (SSC). This is wrong in so many ways...first of all, having all IT services centralized means that you have a single point of failure. Add to that, SSC may have their own priorities that may leave you sitting for weeks and months waiting for installation, configuration and implementation all sorts of IT technologies. It used to be that each department of the Government of Canada could set up their internal services, as long as they conformed to a set of guidelines, and the equipment was bought from government approved vendors who had standing offers with the government.

Now, SSC has become one of the worst BOFH, and everyone suffers.

Comment Re:what about h.265? (Score 5, Informative) 76

It's not just about money, either. The licensing situation for H.265 a cluster-fuck, with patent holders having split into 2 licensing pools and several other patent holders that aren't participating in either pool. So even if companies were content with paying the licensing fees (which are significantly higher than H.264), they don't have any easy way of doing so that will cover all the patent holders. Most big players would prefer to pay and use H.265, but the patent holders have gotten too greedy and too splintered.

Most of the major players have gotten fed up with this shit, and committed to pool their patents and expertise create a royalty free format AV1, in place of H.265. Alliance for Open Media includes: Microsoft, Google, Mozilla, Netfix, Amazon, BBC, ARM, Intel, AMD, nVidia, Broadcom, Cisco, Polycom, and more. The only companies that haven't signed on yet and are big enough to prevent wide adoption are Apple and Qualcomm, and Qualcomm has previously supported VP9, so I don't know why they wouldn't support AV1 once it is ready.

Comment Taking slander to the next level. (Score 1) 590

Conservatives and Republicans are commonly slandered as racists and bigots and any other number of terrible things by the left on a continual basis. The left keeps repeating this lie in the hope that it will be believed, and it is by the fools who fall for it.

Now the leftists are putting their money where their mouth is and actively spending time and resources to pretend that the incoming Republican president is somehow out to get them.

Such histrionics are only possible for people who have it easy. People who actually had to work hard for a living could not afford the luxury of such fake outrage.

Comment Who put the stick up his ass? (Score 4, Informative) 79

All upscaling algorithms are making up data based on assumptions on what "typical" hi-res images should look like given their low-res counterparts. That doesn't mean they are lying or misrepresenting. Furthermore, some assumptions are most statistically valid than others, and some produce more aesthetically pleasing results than others, actually resulting in images that are genuinely more likely to be closer to the true image than nearest neighbor.

Nowhere in google's paper are they suggesting that these images be used for forensic purposes, nor claiming that they are finding "deeper truth" or additional information in the images than what actually exists. They developed an approach that produces better results for common classes of images than previous algorithms, which is useful for a large number of applications that don't require the same level of rigor that forensics do.

Submission + - Old DOS games inspires visual artist's work (wordpress.com)

farrellj writes: For all you old DOS Gaming fans!

Here is what the artist has to say about the micro-paintings:
"The 90s were the golden age of graphic adventures for LucasArts, Westwood Studios, Sierra and many more. These were games written by playful geeks for geeks – entertainment for the emergent technocracy that was daring, quirky and intelligent.

To commemorate early PC gaming heroes and heroines, I’ve created this series of tiny paintings of some of my favourite DOS games."

Check it out here:
https://synescape.wordpress.co...

Comment Around 1985 I started running a BBS (Score 1) 181

It was running Fido, and was part of Fidonet, 163/5, before there were zone numbers! I named it after one of my favourite songs, Solsbury Hill by Peter Gabriel. Our hub for Ottawa was run by a guy named, I kid you not, Al Hacker! He had to pull out his wallet and show us his driver's license at the first Sysop gathering we had! l I started carrying "Echos", which were sort of like Newsgroups on Usenet, and I remember when the nodelist of Fidonet BBSs broke 1,000!

I also met some truly wonderful people, and a few cranks...but it was a formative experience, and later lead to a career doing Unix and Linux.

Comment Re:Sounds like a disaster in the making (Score 3, Interesting) 113

The Servo engine as a whole is alpha, and still has a lot of catching up to do to implement an entire modern browser engine. However, some of it's components are more mature than others, and the code that is there is faster and more robust than the old Gecko code. The idea with Quantum is that rather than waiting for an entire brand new engine to be reimplemented from scratch (Servo) they will be keeping most of Gecko and slowly replacing components of it with new code from Servo, doing the necessary work to bring those components to production quality in the process.

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