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Comment Re:Why should commercial be different from private (Score 1) 239

There are basically three levels of quad(and hexa, etc)copter devices (loosely):

1) Toy Grade: These generally cost $100 USD or less. Most have a range of 100m or less. And most will fall from the sky when they loose radio contact with the controller. If they have cameras, tend to be 720p or lower resolution. Virtually all have brushed motors. They tend to be small and light, and cause little damage if they collide with something like a window. Are used for the simple enjoyment of flying by the pilots.

2) Hobby Grade: Usually between ~$100 to $1,000 USD. Have a range of upward to 500-1000 meters, and usually have more smarts, including things like GPS positioning, telemetry, return to launch point, automatic takeoff and landing, altitude hold, etc. use FPV and/or high resolution (1080p to 2K) cameras. Majority have brushless motors. May be built up from parts and support many different motors, ESCs batteries, flight controllers, video transmitters usually in the 5.8G band, and tend to favour diversity and "cloverleaf" style antennae for control and video over simple dipole ones. If they can carry a payload, it is usually on the order of a GoPro action camera. They tend to be fast, and moderately heavy, and will certainly shatter or break a window in a collision. Tend to be used for things like amateur videography, racing, stunt flying, etc.

3) Professional Grade: From around $1000 USD and up to the tens of thousands of dollars. Range is in kilometers for both control and live video feed, and thus may require a radio operator license. Some are totally autonomous, while many have semi-autonomous such that they can follow a pre-defined flight path, or perform complex actions based upon different events. Tend to be fairly heavy and use brushless motors. Many can carry significant payloads, such as professional/broadcast quality cameras. Are used for professional videography, aerial surveying, Search & Rescue, Law Enforcement, etc.

Remember, this is a broad overview of classification for quadcopters, and of my own humble opinion. I am sure you can poke all sorts of specific holes in it, but would agree that it a good rough guide.

So with these classifications in mind, we can have a better discussion about the governance of these devices, and not confuse or conflagrate restrictions between disparate grades of devices.

Comment Re:Really a hero (Score 1) 68

Truly a Hero! I owe him a great deal!

  I got my real start in Computers and Programming due to Logo. I was lucky enough to get a high school co-op placement at Ottawa's Carleton Board of Education's Computer Pilot Project, the Computer P.L.A.C.E. where I got to play with a Terrapin floor turtle, and ended up having to hack it's code fix it's programming to make it draw square "squares". I taught computer programming using LOGO, both Terrapin and Apple versions, to some of the very same high school teachers who had told me that I couldn't do programming because my math wasn't good enough. It also enabled me to get a summer job teaching at a computer day camp, and thus my career in computers was launched!

This Samhain, Seymour Papert, you will remembered among the honoured ancestors of my craft! Hail and Farewell!

Comment Re:so much for Prime (Score 1) 18

This is for successful Kickstarter products, that is ones that have already shipped to their backers and are ready to start selling the product to others.

All startups who participate in Launchpad receive custom product pages, a comprehensive marketing package, and access to Amazon's global fulfillment network, the retailer notes.

Given that I see no reason why they couldn't be included in prime, and browsing through the page, most of them are.

Unless your post was a joke, in which case: /swoosh.

Comment Don't use Digitalocean (Score 5, Informative) 565

I agree with the other posters that these videos are likely to cause confusion to the average viewer, and are probably in violation of trademark law. That said, the way to handle that is in the courts.

DCMA takedown requests only apply to copyright infringement, not trademark law. It is a violation of the law to use the DCMA this way, both according to the USPTOs guidelines(See B.4), and existing case law.

From the article, it is unknown whether their lawyers sent a DCMA request or a some other sort of cease and desist letter. But either way, Digitalocean had no legal obligation to take down the content, or any legal liability if they didn't take it down. The fact that they shutdown an entire service over a toothless complaint about one page on that service is unacceptable, and people should seriously reconsider doing business with them in the future.

Comment Re:Bank Accounts not mentioned in TFA (Score 1) 621

Does anyone know whether payroll debit cards being used for many low income jobs fall into the open-loop or closed-loop category? The people that are being paid with those are doing so because they don't have a bank account (and often can't get one) so those cards for all practical purposes are their bank account.

Comment Re:"for non-technical users" (Score 4, Informative) 254

You mean like the Anonymous Coward who says "graphical utilities don't update the kernel"

This person should simply click the Mint update manager on their bar which brings up the graphical Update Manager Window. Then you click "View", and from that drop-down menu select "Linux Kernels". From there you can choose from all of the available kernels for Linux Mint.

I don't know about you, but that is certainly looks fairly graphical to me!

Comment Also unblocks the update (Score 4, Interesting) 720

I uninstalled update KB3035583 and blocked it when MS first sent it out several months ago. Then when I installed the last batch of patches in December it installed KB3035583 anyway. Before Windows 10 was released I was looking forward to it as Windows 8 done right. I was a little concerned about the rolling release approach, but was cautiously optimistic. But given their heavy handed approach on forcing windows 10 on people, and all the spyware included in it, they have destroyed any goodwill and trust they built up in recent years. Trust they need if they expect people to buy into their new software-as-a-service approach. My wife's next laptop will be running Linux or Mac OS X, which is not a big deal as she has used both in the past.

Comment That info is easy to get. (Score 1, Interesting) 76

You can get a great deal of information from the "service tag" on your Dell equipment. Every piece of Dell equipment has one, and you can get the entire service history through the Dell website. This is very useful for service types, both inside and outside Dell. But it sounds like some people are abusing that, and I fear that will cause Dell to shut down or limit access to that service. :-(

Comment Natural result of #4 (Score 1) 166

Number 5 are corollaries to number 4:

At its heart, the agile methodology consists of releasing small changes as often as possible ... It is about defining what is considered "production ready," representing that with a set of automated tests, and trusting that the tests written correctly define what it means for code to be "production ready." ...

For the true devops rock stars, it's also about taking that code and sending it directly to production through continuous deployment. If your company allows developers to check in code that goes through automated pre-check-in tests, gets handed over to another set of tests to ensure that the code is ready for production, then goes live on your production servers if deemed ready automatically, then you know you've achieved devops greatness.

If your organization really believes that automated tests can find all show-stopper bugs, and that absolutely no man-in-the-loop soak testing is needed to find unexpected problems, then you are guaranteed to have these failures in ops rather than dev. At that point, you are either explicitly accept that you are treating your users/customers as alpha testers, or the blame is on whoever adopted that QA policy, not the person who introduced the bug.

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