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Comment Re:Human nature.. been going on for a long time (Score 1) 99

This is old news, just newer tech.

I remember in the late 1980s the guys at the auto body shop using the DPS terminal to access the state license plate database and get the name and address info on cute girls they saw in their cars.

The base urges to and desire to gain an advantage if they think there are no consequences have always been there.

Comment Re:Security that the USER cannot control. . . (Score 1) 194

I don't have the full story - there's aspects she can't share with me, but I gathered that the politics of switching that stuff to Oracle are more complicated than just the SOX issue... but SOX compliance was the nail in the coffin so to speak. And it was a departmental decision, not just her. I do know their projects involves the handling of employee data for tens of thousands of people in many countries, as well as customer data and their compliance department is rather large and scary.

Comment Re:Security that the USER cannot control. . . (Score 2) 194

> Not controlling your own security will make things like, oh, HIPAA and PCI compliance problematical.

Add Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) Compliance to the list as well.

My wife just dealt with this at her Fortune 500 company. Microsoft will not disclose completely what the telemetry in SQL Server 2016 is phoning home. They have no choice with respect to compliance , and have made the decision to migrate their older reporting from SQL server (older versions) to Oracle.

She wishes she had a recording of their MS sales rep telling her team that it doesn't matter.

Comment Re:Time to sell my Apple stock... (Score 3, Interesting) 361

> But... but... you forgot to mention they're using previous-generation processors in their brand-new laptops! That takes courage!

Not really. The Kaby Lake equivalents of the Skylake CPUs they are using have not been released yet, so they are the current generation CPUs in those configurations.

Comment Re:It's optional (Score 1) 57

I have no idea why T-Mobile has so many fanboys hearing only what they want to hear, but their press release isn't exactly ambiguous:

With T-Mobile ONE, even video is unlimited at standard definition [...] For customers who want higher definition video, T-Mobile ONE has you covered too with an HD add-on for $25 a month per line.

Ars has the same take on T-Mobile charging $25 extra for "HD."

Comment Re:How are they doing this? (Score 2) 57

According to this anon, they do string matching on host, content-type, and SNI fields, which is how they throttled HTTPS YouTube. If you wrote a proxy that rewrote those fields, you could escape Binge-On. Or apparently make Binge-On detect random shit as an approved streaming partner and zero-rate it for you.

Comment Re:how many people (Score 1) 57

I want 1080p YouTube videos on my phone. My phone has a 1080p screen, and even at native resolution it's already a pain in the ass to make out any text, captions, or fine details (mouse cursors, HP bars, wires and gauges, whathaveyou). Downscaling the video to <1.5Mbps 480p and blowing it back up again doesn't help legibility any.

If you nerds want to relive the 90s, nothing's stopping you from transcoding everything you watch to 64Kbps RealMedia(tm) first. I certainly wouldn't pay anyone to run a Minecraft filter on all my video, though, and I doubly wouldn't pay them again to unfuck it.

Comment Re:How are they doing this? (Score 1) 57

how can T-Mobile stop people from getting full HD streams from that provider without paying the extra $25 charge

They use some form of DPI to detect video content, and throttle everything that matches--even non-streaming downloads of video files--to 1.5 Mbps. If your video provider of choice feels like sucking T-Mobile's cock, there's an API approved providers can implement to serve <1.5Mbps streams to the "Binge-On" customer instead.

If your video provider of choice has not written any T-Mobile-specific code, they better be able to dynamically degrade to a <1.5Mbps stream, or the video will buffer or not load at all. A VPN might be able to evade that, except a VPN would probably be detected as "hotspot" or "tethering" usage, which is throttled to 128Kbps on the new "unlimited" plans.

Anyone claiming the video throttling ("Binge-On") is optional or can be turned off hasn't read TFA or TFS. That used to be the case, and still is on the old plans, but it's mandatory on the new "unlimited" plans in order to prevent you from actually using any data.

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