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Submission + - Higher sodium intake associated with lower blood pressure. You read that right. (sandiegouniontribune.com)

schwit1 writes: In another blow against decades of accepted medical wisdom, one of the most prestigious, long-running studies reports that lowering sodium intake doesn’t reduce blood pressure.

The study also implies that most Americans are consuming a perfectly healthy amount of salt, the main source of sodium. But those who are salt-sensitive, about 20 to 25 percent of the population, still need to restrict salt intake.

Consuming fewer than 2,500 milligrams of sodium daily is actually associated with higher blood pressure, according to the Framingham Offspring Study report, given today. The American Heart Association recommends consuming no more than 2,300 milligrams of sodium daily, equal to a teaspoon of ordinary iodized table salt.

High blood pressure is a known risk factor for heart disease and stroke. Hence, lowering salt intake is supposed to lower blood pressure and thus reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke. But the study found that supposition to be unfounded.

Moreover, the lowest blood pressure was recorded by those who consumed 4,000 milligrams or more a day — amounts considered dangerously high by medical authorities such as the American Heart Association.

Comment COBOL programmers aren't all old (Score 1) 197

There's a COBOL shop in my small town that contracts for corporations and the government. I know several COBOL specialists in their 30s. It's actually an extremely lucrative field to get into these days, with good pay and job security.

Rewriting all that COBOL code in some other language would be bound to cause major problems.

Submission + - Spying on Students in the Classroom (eff.org)

schwit1 writes: It seems a day doesn’t go by without another report of a company monitoring what we do on the Internet and selling that data to generate more revenue. And now the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has examined what happens to the data that's collected from students using technology in the classroom. They released the results of an extensive survey covering students in grades K-12.

What they found was that little work has been done to protect the privacy of the student information that is collected from both the classroom and from using the online software the schools issue for use at home on the students' own devices. They found that while many school districts have embraced technology and all of the benefits it can bring to the schools and students, often little thought has been given to one of the unintended consequences of this: the students' privacy.

The study was very extensive and took two years to complete. Virtually everything was examined, including what's being done along each point from the suppliers of hardware and software and the cloud services, to the schools and the students. They found that lots of data is being collected without permission and that it's easy for outside companies to access the data. They also discovered that there's little to prevent suppliers from sharing data with others, including advertisers.

Comment Re:Common (Score 1) 45

What is frustrating about this is how easy it would be for the cops to roll these guys up if they wanted to. I mean they're providing a mailing address, even if it is a PO Box that isn't going to keep them anonymous for long. I bet it wouldn't even take too many arrests before the volume of mail really dropped. The people who do this need to mail fraud thousands of times every week just to get a few bites.

For the scam to work at all they need a US address. Ain't nobody gonna fill out a SCE "bill" and then mail it in an international envelope to Belarus or something. I guess they could be using a remailing service, but at the least the cops could get their account shut down.

Submission + - SmartThings Has Access to Tens of Thousands of Private GitHub Repos (reddit.com)

An anonymous reader writes: After Samsung acquired SmartThings for a cool $200 million a few years ago, the company has been aggressively pushing for developers to enable GitHub access. At one time, the company boasted it had more than 20,000 developers on the platform. What most of those developers do not know is that the SmartThings integration is a blanket read on all repositories in your account. Why GitHub makes this an option, I have no idea. With all the turmoil over at Samsung lately, do you want that company to have access to all of your GitHub repositories? Have you checked what else has access to your repos lately?

Submission + - Google Loses Top Hardware Executive

randomErr writes: David Foster joined Alphabet Inc.'s Google in October as part of its aggressive hardware effort has left the company. As the vice president of hardware product development he worked on the launch of the Pixel smartphone and Home speaker. Both of which are competitors to the Amazon Echo, Foster's previous employer. Google will not comment on why he is leaving.

Comment Mistake. Or not. Is Windows 10 an OS or Spyware? (Score 1) 41

I would never use Windows 10 except connected to a separate router, and only for testing, so I didn't think about that.

Windows 10 is possibly the worst spyware ever made. Quote: "Buried in the service agreement is permission to poke through everything on your PC."

Comment Re:EE Degree (Score 3, Insightful) 183

It's a piece of paper that says "You can work hard, study, make your own mind up and evaluate things critically, research and a whole host of other extremely advantageous traits while operating in a field of rigor and discipline". Coupled with the experience that also says "I can do the job you're asking me to do as described".

It's a piece of paper that says a lot...

Submission + - Intel Puma6 modems highly vulnerable to DOS attack (dslreports.com)

Idisagree writes: It's being reported by users from the dslreports forum that the Puma6 Intel cable modem variants are highly susceptible to a very low bandwidth DOS attack.

To add to this there are class actions lawsuits already going forward for performance issues with the Puma6. (https://www.classactionlawyers.com/puma6/)

It would appear the atom chip was never going to live up to the task it was designed for and these issues may have been known within Intel for quite some time.

Comment Re:Yes, but... (Score 1) 214

How do you know overruns are way more common? Your sample set consists of two sources of samples: personal experience (and you might just be a bad planner), and events reported in the press (and 'project finishes on time, on budget!' usually doesn't get reported).

I'd like to see some numbers before I believe that statement.

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