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Submission + - Inside the NSA's cybersecurity summer camp (

v3rgEz writes: It's fair to say that after the Edward Snowden leaks, the National Security Agency (NSA) has had a bit of an image problem, which in turn has affected recruiting efforts. So what is the NSA doing to combat all this bad PR? Summer camps. And FOIA site MuckRock has filed FOIA requests to find out exactly what is going on at those camps, turning up a range of activities from pen testing and social engineering training to, er, the NSA's own "Kobayashi Maru." Read the full documents at MuckRock.

Submission + - Family sues Amazon after counterfeit hoverboard catches fire, destroys home (

tripleevenfall writes: A Nashville family whose $1 million home was destroyed earlier this year in a fire caused by a hoverboard toy is suing Amazon saying the retail giant knowingly sold a dangerous product.

The lawsuit says the seller of the hoverboard listed online, "W-Deals," is a sham organization that is registered to an apartment in New York City that has not responded to requests from lawyers in the case. It alleges the family was sold a counterfeit product from China instead of a brand with a Samsung lithium ion battery they believed they were buying from Amazon.

Comment Re:Easy win so load show up with friends (Score 4, Interesting) 169

Horse shit. It costs about as much as Netflix and all it offers is the CBS library. I already own all the Star Trek that there is, and can watch it any time without streaming on their shit service. What else am I going to watch? Murder She Wrote?

$7/month (or $10/month if I don't want to be forced to watch unskippable commercials) for one show, as opposed to all the content I can get on Netflix... fuck that.

The commercials again... UNSKIPPABLE. This isn't what the consumer wanted, this is what the network executives wanted.

Submission + - New Code Injection Attack Works On All Windows Versions (

Orome1 writes: Researchers from security outfit enSilo have uncovered a new code injection technique that can be leveraged against all Windows versions without triggering current security solutions. They’ve dubbed the technique AtomBombing, because it exploits the operating system’s atom tables. These tables are provided by the operating system to allow applications to store and access data. They can also be used to share data between applications. What the researches found is that a threat actor can write malicious code into an atom table and force a legitimate program to retrieve the malicious code from the table. They also found that the legitimate program, now containing the malicious code, can be manipulated to execute that code.

Comment Re:Touch screen (Score 1) 337

I don't mind them adding the touch bar. It looks like they've nailed the deep integration in a way that Apple is pretty good at doing. What I could not believe is that that was it. I literally sat there after the show was over half expecting them to do the "one more thing" bit to show us why they even bothered with the press conference. Such a minor, gimmicky feature doesn't stretch very well to take up as much time as they talked about it.

Submission + - Feds charge 61 people over Indian call center IRS scams

BUL2294 writes: Following the arrests earlier this month in India of call center employees posing as IRS or immigration agents, USA Today and Consumerist are reporting that the US Department of Justice has charged 61 people in the US and India of facilitating the scam, bilking millions from Americans thinking they were facing immediate arrest and prosecution.

"According to the indictment — which covers 20 individuals in the U.S. and 32 people and five call centers in India — since about 2012 the defendants used information obtained from data brokers and other sources to call potential victims impersonating officers from the IRS or U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services."

Submission + - The FCC just passed sweeping new rules to protect your online privacy ( 1

jriding writes: Federal regulators have approved unprecedented new rules to ensure broadband providers do not abuse their customers' app usage and browsing history, mobile location data and other sensitive personal information generated while using the Internet.

The rules, passed Thursday in a 3-to-2 vote by the Federal Communications Commission, require Internet providers, such as Comcast and Verizon, to obtain their customers' explicit consent before using or sharing that behavioral data with third parties, such as marketing firms.

Submission + - How Police Body Cameras Fail (

tedlistens writes: Since the shooting of unarmed, 18-year-old Michael Brown in 2014—an incident that was not captured on camera—activists and city governments have stridently fought for more police oversight through body-worn cameras, and cities are responding, with the help of millions of dollars in body camera grants from the White House. But the public is discovering that the technology isn't foolproof: Cameras fall off, officers fail to record, and the video itself can be kept largely out of the public record, in deference to privacy laws, police policies, and the challenges of managing massive amounts of footage. But, critics worry, when video collected for oversight purposes isn't shared publicly—or isn’t collected at all—citizens might become more suspicious about police misconduct, amplifying mistrust amid an effort to fight it. An article at Fast Company details ways in which body camera programs are falling short of their goals, and ideas for improving what some have called the most rapid technology upgrade in policing history.

Submission + - FCC Enacts Major New Online Privacy Rule

Trailrunner7 writes: The FCC has voted to enact a new rule that will force broadband companies to get consent from customers before they sell information about those customers’ online movements, history, and other actions.

The new rule will require broadband companies to have customers opt in to the sale or sharing of their online histories as part of marketing or ad deals. It includes restrictions on the way that providers can share users’ location data and other information and also ensures that they will have to tell consumers exactly what data they collect and what they do with it. The changes do not apply to how broadband providers can use customer information in their own marketing, though.

The new regulations also require that broadband providers have “common-sense” data breach notifications and reasonable security practices.

The vote by the FCC makes distinctions between broadband providers and phone carriers and other service providers. Before the vote, providers and others had urged the FCC to align its rules with existing ones from the FTC on usage of customer data for marketing.

Comment Re:More condoms less climate change (Score 4, Informative) 174


"lesser countries"?

Does the concept of ranking things bother you? Do you feel every country should be ranked the same, just to be more fair? Why, if I may ask? What is a country to you, other than just an administrative division of land with some local rules? Are you some kind of nationalist?

Countries like the US or most places in Europe are objectively better places to live than most countries in Africa. It's why so many people want to migrate there.

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