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Comment Re:How long until the cheaters take over? (Score 2) 46

The speed bubble is ~35 mph, with a 30 minute timeout. That being said, I've been on flights with wifi, locked into the departing airport, and it's taken an hour or more to get out of the sandbox. Sucked transferring at DIA to BWI and driving home. Jitter really shouldn't play into it for more than a couple of minutes with close portals. Cell tower drift, on the other hand, while helping with Trekker, can screw you on a desk portal for a while (I've drifted 10s of km away sometimes).

Comment Re: How long until the cheaters take over? (Score 1) 46

Yeah, some people where I work really want to have PvP, but they don't play Ingress, so haven't seen the, um, drama associated with COMM, interactions, Intel maps, etc. I keep telling them that it's a Really Bad Idea, because even though they're adults and want to battle coworkers, there are so many bad, bad things that'll happen.

Comment Re:Using while driving (Score 2) 46

Yeah, Niantic may need to implement the speedlock/sandbox they have with Ingress, especially since several interactions require even more attention than "tap, hack". I can confidently hack portals in Ingress while driving (under 35 mph) with no fear of losing control. Needing to spin a pic at a Pokestop is slightly more involved. Needing to toss Pokeballs or battle at a gym is *way* too involved to do while driving...

Comment Re:Actually 3rd point was agreement with trial jud (Score 1) 23

Actually whoever the new guy is, I don't find the site to be "improved" at all; seems a little crummy. The story was butchered and incorrectly interpreted, and the all important software for interaction seems less interactive.

But what do I know?

As to my absence I've been a bit overwhelmed by work stuff, sorry about that, it's no excuse :)

Comment Actually 3rd point was agreement with trial judge (Score 4, Informative) 23

The story as published implies that the ruling overruled the lower court on the 3 issues. In fact, it was agreeing with the trial court on the third issue -- that the sporadic instances of Vimeo employees making light of copyright law did not amount to adopting a "policy of willful blindness".

Submission + - Appeals court slams record companies on DMCA in Vimeo case

NewYorkCountryLawyer writes: In the long-simmering appeal in Capitol Records v. Vimeo, the US Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit upheld Vimeo's positions on many points regarding the Digital Millenium Copyright Act. In its 55 page decision (PDF) the Court ruled that (a) the Copyright Office was dead wrong in concluding that pre-1972 sound recordings aren't covered by the DMCA, (b) the judge was wrong to think that Vimeo employees' merely viewing infringing videos was sufficient evidence of "red flag knowledge", and (c) a few sporadic instances of employees being cavalier about copyright law did not amount to a "policy of willful blindness" on the part of the company. The Court seemed to take particular pleasure in eviscerating the Copyright Office's rationales. Amicus curiae briefs in support of Vimeo had been submitted by a host of companies and organizations including the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the Computer & Communications Industry Association, Public Knowledge, Google, Yahoo!, Facebook, Microsoft, Pinterest, Tumblr, and Twitter.

Comment Yeah... passwords... (Score 1) 637

Whenever I can, a completely randomly-generated password. At work, where, for reasons I can't go into, I need to change it every 3 days currently, a semi-random component and a date-based component, which ironically beats out the "last X similar passwords" check. If they're gonna make my life hell, I'll return it in spades... Also, I have to write down the date-based part, just to remember it for the next 3 days... #imahorribleperson

Submission + - 31 Ways to Know Your Project is Doomed

Esther Schindler writes: We've all been there: The project went horribly wrong. Nobody was happy with the application or product (if it ever did ship). And you're ashamed to let anyone know you had anything to do with it. Especially since, with hindsight, you realize that the Signs Of Doom were there all along, and you missed them. When THIS happened, you should have known....!

This article shares 31 project danger signs you should recognize, so you can decide if it's possible to fix them or bail. But oh, we can be so certain that there are plenty more to add...!

Submission + - Don't be fooled by Opera browser claim of 150% battery life (computerworld.com)

richi writes: The Opera Web browser has a new 'power-saving' feature. Opera claims you can get 'up to' 50% more battery life — but is that likely? Uh, NO!

Yes, the actual software tweaks will make a difference, but the tests Opera's quoting are skewed, unscientific, and compare apples to oranges. But what do you expect from a company that's trying to get bought by a Chinese consortium for more than $1.2 billion?

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