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Submission + - ForgeRock Seem to be Distancing Themselves from Open Source (forgerock.org) 1

Guy Paddock writes: As recently reported on Hacker News, ForgeRock — the company who develops OpenAM, OpenDJ, and OpenIDM — has cut off public access to the latest CDDL code for their projects.

Based on revision history, ForgeRock quietly updated "How to Build" pages in Confluence on November 14th, 2016 to point to different, "public" repositories that only have source code from the last major version of each of their products. Then, in the early morning of November 29th, ForgeRock sealed off both source code and pull request access to all of the original repositories. Only the repositories containing the older, major release code are now available for public consumption.

The open source community is now left to speculate what role, if any, they will play in helping to shape the future of ForgeRock products. This may also have repercussions for small-shop deployments who rely on the open source edition for bug fixes and security updates.

To date, the company has made no formal press release or public statement about their plans, but rumblings in user forums have prompted Aaron Kozak, the Digital Marketing Coordinator for ForgeRock, to weight in.

Mr. Kozak responded to users' concerns by stating, "We apologise for any inconvenience our recent changes may have caused. We are preparing for the next major release of the ForgeRock Identity Platform and as part of this process, we are no longer providing public access to our nightly builds and source code for the upcoming platform release. Open source downloads are still available via https://backstage.forgerock.co...."

When asked whether access to the latest code (the "trunk") would be restored after the upcoming releases, Kozak did not speculate, and offered only a statement that, "I’m sure that more details will be made available with the new release in the near future, but unfortunately I do not have any more information at this time."

Submission + - Virginia spent over half a million on cell surveillance that mostly doesn't work (muckrock.com)

v3rgEz writes: In 2014, the Virginia State Police spent $585,265 on a specially modified Suburban outfitted with the latest and greatest in cell phone surveillance: The DRT 1183C, affectionately known as the DRTbox. But according to logs uncovered by public records website MuckRock, the pricey ride was only used 12 times — and only worked 7 of those times. Read the full DRTbox documents at MuckRock.

Submission + - The Lack of Women in Cybersecurity is a Problem and a Threat (securityledger.com) 1

chicksdaddy writes: The devaluation of traditionally “soft” skills like empathy, communication and collaboration in the information security space may be hampering the ability of IT security teams to respond to human-focused threats and attacks, according to this article at The Security Ledger. (https://securityledger.com/2016/12/cybers-lack-of-women-a-problem-and-threat/)

Failing to prioritize skills like empathy, communication, and collaboration and the people who have them (regardless of their gender) and focusing on "hard skills" (technical expertise) "limits our conceptions of security solutions and increases risks to our systems and users."

The problem goes beyond phishing attacks and social engineering, too. “Studies have shown that projects that embrace diversity are more successful. It’s a simple truth that people with different life backgrounds and life experiences bring unique perspectives to problem-solving,” says Amie Stepanovich, the U.S. policy manager at Access Now.

In short: "when we keep hiring technologists to solve problems, we get keep getting technical solutions." Too often, such technical fixes fail to account for the human environment in which they will be deployed. “It’s prioritizing a ‘tech first’—not a ‘human first’ or ‘empathy first’—perspective,” says Dr. Sara “Scout” Sinclair Brody, the executive director of Simply Secure.

This isn’t the first article to raise a red flag over the technology sector's glaring shortage of empathy. (http://www.newyorker.com/business/currency/silicon-valley-has-an-empathy-vacuum).

And while instilling empathy and compassion in adults who lack it might seem like a tall order, the piece argues that it isn't an unsolvable problem: there are entire fields—like user experience and human-centered design—dedicated to improving the way humans and technology interact. “Shockingly little of that,” says Brody, “has made it into the security domain.”

Comment Re:Oh boy, the media is not bias (Score 1) 119

Ha, you must be a time-traveler from the pre-SJW leftist era. These days the apeshit coming from the SJW left makes the old A.M. radio batshit coming from the right look positively sane.

It's a pretty bizarro world where liberals are now the ones screaming for banning free speech and bullying their opponents into silence. They've even managed to one-up conservatives on their conspiracy theories. I remember laughing after Obama's election when pawn shops were reporting a run on gun-buying from gun nuts convinced that Obama was coming for their guns. The I read a story recently about how there has been a run on birth control from crazy lefties convinced that Donald trump is coming for their birth control. Lol, same crazy, different day.

Submission + - The forgotten story of America's first toy robot (fastcompany.com) 2

harrymcc writes: In 1954, the Ideal Toy Company released Robert The Robot, the first toy robot made in the U.S. He was made of plastic instead of the more common tin, had a hand-cranked remote control and talked. And he not only became a bestseller, but appeared in a movie, inspired songs, and was generally a media superstar. And then everyone forgot about him. Over at Fast Company, Jared Newman chronicles his odd and interesting story.

Submission + - 6 seconds: How hackers only need moments to guess card number and security code (telegraph.co.uk) 1

schwit1 writes: Criminals can work out the card number, expiry date and security code for a Visa debit or credit card in as little as six seconds using guesswork, researchers have found.

Fraudsters use a so-called Distributed Guessing Attack to get around security features put in place to stop online fraud, and this may have been the method used in the recent Tesco Bank hack.

According to a study published in the academic journal IEEE Security & Privacy, that meant fraudsters could use computers to systematically fire different variations of security data at hundreds of websites simultaneously.

Within seconds, by a process of elimination, the criminals could verify the correct card number, expiry date and the three-digit security number on the back of the card.

Mohammed Ali, a PhD student at the university's School of Computing Science, said: "This sort of attack exploits two weaknesses that on their own are not too severe but, when used together, present a serious risk to the whole payment system.

Comment Re:Why would this concern Trump? (Score 1) 184

There is the very slim possibility that he will ally himself with Putin and Assad and finally take an active role in actually fighting back against ISIS and the radical Islamic movement that has come to dominate the region since the "Arab Spring." I'd give it a 10-15% chance, tops.

Other than this slim hope, I suspect it will be more of the same. He'll continue to suck up to countries like Saudi Arabia and they'll keep funneling the oil money we give them to movements that want to destroy Western civilization. Russia, Iran and Syria will continue to be the only countries really fighting ISIS. Turkey will continue its descent from the lone beacon of modern civilization in the region into just another radicalized Sharia-authoritarian shithole. And Western Europe will continue to keep their fingers in their ears in their own dreamworld where Islam is just fine and Muslims can't wait to come to Europe to exchange hugs with feminists and gay people.

Comment Re:Die (Score 1) 228

Well, it depends very greatly on whose definition of "harassment" they're going to use. There are plenty these days on the SJW left who define "harassment" as pretty much any public statement that disagrees with their views or challenges them in any way.

If they're just going to ban direct threats ("I'm going to kill you!"), doxxing, calls to violence ("We should go burn this guy's house down!"), etc. then I doubt most people would object.

If they're going to ban anyone who says "I think we should deport illegal immigrants" or "I support a border wall" that's a VERY different story.

It's also a very different story if they decide to get into the business of deciding what ideas and news are worthy and which aren't. One man's "conspiracy theory" or "fake news" is another man's "story that the mainstream media are ignoring, but shouldn't be." Right now, other media companies like Wikipedia are already beginning to ban "fake news" on the right, but not on the left. You can learn all about discredited pedophilia claims against Donald Trump, for example. But search Wikipedia for the equally dubious "Pizzagate" and you'll see that it's been blocked as "A conspiracy theory falsely claiming the existence of a child trafficking ring". It's that double standard that people are worried about.

It's hardly a secret that most of these media companies are located in SJW-central Silicon Valley and that their leadership skews radically left. So you would have to have your head buried pretty far into the sand to buy into the idea that they have any intention of applying their new censorship policies fairly.

Comment Re:Garages? (Score 1) 11

Think about the power to weight ratio--with as little as a plastic vehicle with a passenger or two would weigh on Ceres, the ratio would be very high, especially after they found the ferromagnetics in the belt that could be magnetized a hundred times as strong as today's (that story, "The Pirate", is still in edit), replace the magnets in a 100 watt motor with them, and one watt will run that motor as well as 100 did the old.

They already had real moon buggies, they're still up there. They used wheels, but the moon is a LOT heavier than Ceres.

Imagine playing basketball on Ceres? I might add that to a story, there were microgravity sports in "Mars, Ho!".

Comment Re:Hard drive or software? (Score 1) 106

I don't back up daily, more like weekly, plus whenever I have a rash of new data. I keep the backup drive unplugged except when backing up, and never in s thunderstorm. Losing my non-backed up data would only hurt a little, it isn't like I'll lose a 10,000 customer database or anything.

Before I retired, backups were automatically done daily by software. I had to change the backup tapes weekly.

User Journal

Journal Journal: Santa Killed My Dog!

They say that Santa's coming,
He comes 'round every year.
He comes he'll meet a shotgun slug
'cause he ain't welcome here.

Five years ago this Christmas
The fatass came around
With jingle bells and ho ho hos
And looking like a clown.

He came in for a landing
As I let out a yawn
My house is pretty little
So he landed on the lawn.

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