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Submission + - Commodore C64 Survives Over 25 Years Balancing Drive Shafts In Auto Repair Shop (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: One common gripe in the twenty-first century is that nothing is built to last anymore. Even complex, expensive computers seem to have a relatively short shelf-life nowadays. However, one computer in a small auto repair shop in Gdansk, Poland has survived for the last twenty-five years against all odds. The computer in question here is a Commodore C64 that has been balancing driveshafts non-stop for a quarter of a century. The C64C looks like it would fit right in with a scene from Fallout 4 and has even survived a nasty flood. This Commodore 64 contains a few homemade aspects, however. The old computer uses a sinusoidal waveform generator and piezo vibration sensor in order to measure changes in pressure, acceleration, temperature, strain or force by converting them to an electrical charge. The C64C interprets these signals to help balance the driveshafts in vehicles.

Comment The "right" (but slimey) way to discriminate: (Score 1) 460

Insist that because future projects "may" require a security clearance and that the company wants flexibility to move people around, all applicants must be able to pass the "initial gate-keeper" steps of getting a security clearance, including "must be a US citizen or demonstrate ability to get a security clearance despite not being a US citizen."

This will weed out most people who were neither born here nor have been here long enough to get citizenship, including disproportionate numbers of people of Asian descent.

Is this legal? Very likely. Is it slimey? Assuming it's a cover for discrimination and you really aren't going to need a workforce where everyone can get a security clearance in short order, yes.

Comment Re:Seriously...music off YouTube...? (Score 1) 307

Well, when I was 16-24yrs, I was into and enjoyed high fidelity stereo....my friends all did as well.

Er, not unless your parents and friends' parents were very well off, or all of them were in the military and bought their equipment duty-free in Asia you didn't. Before digital, in America a high fidelity stereo (let alone quadraphonic system) would cost your a couple grand.

I used to have an audiophile-quality system I bought stationed in Thailand, but it was stolen in a burglary. I have a pair of JBLs now, three way with twelve inch woofers. I miss my old stereo.

But I rip from YouTube occasionally, and rip from KSHE every Sunday night when they play six full albums. With Windows all it takes is Audacity and a setting in mmsys.cpl to capture a signal sent to your sound card, you don't need those goofs' web site.

I make CDs from KSHE's albums for the car, and they sound as good as factory CDs -- in the car. Their difference in quality in the house with the JBLs is marginal. It's a LOT better sound than a cassette recorded at home.

If you're in St. Louis (I'm not) you can plug your digital FM radio's "out" jacks into your computer's input jacks and you actually will have CD quality music.

The labels are fighting a losing cause.

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