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Comment Re:Far earlier breakthroughs (Score 1) 68

Topic-specific printed non-professionally-run newsletters did much the same as USENET groups did in bringing together people from around the globe who had similar interests. Granted, they weren't as fast (USENET typically circulated the globe in 24-48 hours in the early days, with some "high-cost-to-deliver" sites taking days or a week or more to get updates).

Amateur radio also had (and still has) similar communities-of-interest but, due to the way radio works, it's difficult to have a true "world-wide" community over amateur radio alone (these days, "hams" take advantage of the Internet so distance isn't as much of limitation). I'm not saying it isn't happening, it's just much harder than having a community where everyone is within a few thousand miles of each other.

Comment Re:Cat got my tongue (subjects are dumb) (Score 1) 37

Question 1: Who the hell reuses passwords, and why? Anyone left not using password managers?

I don't trust my password manager to not be broken into without me knowing about it.

If someone breaks into my brain, I'll probably know about it ("Hey, put the rubber hose down! I give, just tell me what password you need!").

Comment Far earlier breakthroughs (Score 1) 68

The invention of the telegraph and the wide-scale availability to the paying masses through commercial telegraph operators was arguably the first real breakthrough in electronic digital communications, assuming you consider the "on/off" of Morse-code-type telegraphy to be digital, which I do.

Smoke signals, semaphore signals, and other forms of non-electronic long-distance communication are also typically digital. As to whether they were "available to the masses" or not, that varies.

Writing, whether using alphabets or pictographs, is arguably a form of digital communications. Speaking in words or groups of sub-word sounds (phonemes and syllables) that have distinct meanings is arguably digital (as opposed to analog), as long as the dictionary size is, for all practical purposes limited. This is the case for all conventional spoken and written human languages that I am aware of.

So, in that sense, we humans have been using digital forms of communication since, well, ever since we started talking to each other, which likely pre-dates humanity itself.

Comment Re:SJW Bullshit (Score 5, Informative) 219

I posted this in another post below, but I just wanted to reiterate it here, for those who might not fully understand the situation.

It might help your understanding of the situation to understand that the CIA and NSA now use fake rape and sexual assault/harassment claims as their preferred method of character assassination (much easier, less messy, and just as effective as actual assassination). It happened to the poor bastard IMF head who made the VERY stupid mistake of challenging the supremacy of the U.S. Dollar. It also happened to Julian Assange and others.

No tin-foil hats here. It's just their modern way of doing business. So any time you hear of sex crimes charges against any member of the hacker/security community (or anyone else the NSA or CIA might have a vested interest in silencing or ostracizing), you should be VERY, VERY skeptical of the charges (and take a long hard look at the accusers).

Comment Re:Rape sympathizers (Score 1) 219

It might help your understanding of the situation to understand that the CIA and NSA now use fake rape and sexual assault/harassment claims as their preferred method of character assassination (much easier, less messy, and just as effective as actual assassination). It happened to the poor bastard IMF head who made the VERY stupid mistake of challenging the supremacy of the U.S. Dollar. It also happened to Julian Assange and others.

No tin-foil hats here. It's just their modern way of doing business. So any time you hear of sex crimes charges against any member of the hacker/security community (or anyone else the NSA or CIA might have a vested interest in silencing or ostracizing), you should be VERY, VERY skeptical of the charges (and take a long hard look at the accusers).

Comment It can be as good as postal voting (Score 1) 214

Heck, it can be even better because with postal voting, every mail-carrier can be a man-in-the-middle DOS attacker. "Sorry Mr. Voter, your ballot never arrived, and since the election is over, too bad for you."

At least with online voting you can be assured your unopened ballot actually arrived.

Now, as for all of the OTHER weaknesses of mail-in balloting, including vote-counter fraud, voter-location (spouse/caretaker) fraud, coerced-voting fraud, etc., yes, those are still problems.

Internet voting makes the most sense for people in outer space and others with unreliable or slow paper-mail. It makes some sense for people who can't get to polling places who would use vulnerable vote-by-mail systems anyways. It also makes some sense in states like Oregon which use vote-by-mail exclusively for some elections (but it has the downside risk that it can weaken public support for a return to poll-based voting under the illusion that internet-based voting is as secure as poll-based voting).

Comment Don't trust any device (Score 2) 87

Don't trust any device inside or outside of your network until you can verify it is trustworthy. Even then, don't trust it any more than you have to.

Okay, that's the ideal world.

In the real world such a policy would cripple most enterprises, so we have to compromise somewhere.

What that compromise should look like will be on a case-by-case basis.

Comment Re:HB-1 delayed the inevitable (Score 1) 329

Our ancestors came to America looking for work.

That's true as far as it goes, but we should not forget:

* Some came for other reasons, such as religious freedom or to flee persecution.

* A very sizable minority was forcibly dragged here in chains or were born into slavery.

* Some were brought her by their parents before they were old enough to say "no, I'll stay behind, thank-you" or were forcibly dragged here by husbands (back then, a wife didn't really have much of an option but to obey her husband).

* Others came for other reasons.

Comment A good use of taxpayer money? (Score 1) 178

Which is a better use of taxpayer money for something that won't get re-used a lot and which might have a short shelf life?

1) Expensive, good, and late, possibly too-late-to-be-useful?

2) Slightly less expensive, crappy-but-functional, and on time

Sometimes the answer is #1, sometimes it is #2. Sometimes you just don't know and you (or your bean-counting managers) have to make a call that might be wrong.

Bottom line:

I'd much rather the hacking tools be crappy than the code that runs something that directly affects tens of millions of people, like, oh, I don't know, the software that makes sure Social Security checks go out on time and in the right amounts?

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