Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. Also, Slashdot's Facebook page has a chat bot now. Message it for stories and more. ×

Comment Re:those who ignore IRC (Score 2) 57

Do one thing, and do it well.

If that one thing is "communicate," well, then that "one thing" may encompass sharing screens, sharing code, sharing text, sharing audio, sharing video, etc. etc. etc. or at the very least, calling some under-the-hood program to do those things for you while the user perceives it as "one seamless thing."

If that "one thing" is "texting" then that "one thing" may include getting typed input from the user, determining who the recipient is, determining how to send it to the recipient, sending it, receiving data from someone else, displaying it on the screen, or at the very least, calling some under-the-hood program to do those things for you while the user perceives it as "one seamless thing."

Now, you and those you communicate with may communicate more efficiently using a "text only" medium most of the time, but not every team does. Some teams actually communicate better using a seamlessly-integrated multi-media communications tool that has audio, video, screen-sharing, file-sharing, etc. If that tool happens to use IRC protocols, VNC protocols, gitlib, pastebin, etc., under the hood or if it is using some other technology, the people who are participating in the conversation don't care nor should they have to.

Submission + - White House blocks news organizations from press briefing (cnn.com)

ClickOnThis writes: CNN reports that it, along with several other major news organizations, were blocked from attending a press briefing at the White House today. From the article:

The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, Politico and BuzzFeed were also excluded from the meeting, which is known as a gaggle and is less formal than the televised Q-and-A session in the White House briefing room. The gaggle was held by White House press secretary Sean Spicer.

In a brief statement defending the move, administration spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said the White House "had the pool there so everyone would be represented and get an update from us today."

The pool usually includes a representative from one television network and one print outlet. In this case, four of the five major television networks — NBC, ABC, CBS and Fox News — were invited and attended the meeting, while only CNN was blocked.

And while The New York Times was kept out, conservative media organizations Breitbart News, The Washington Times and One America News Network were also allowed in.


Submission + - Ask Slashdot: how can I defeat Disqus's link hijacking? 1

FalseModesty writes: If somebody includes a URL in a Disqus comment, Disqus now hijacks the link to point to its own server, so it can track what each user clicks on. For example, if I make a comment with a link in it, Disqus will alter the link to something like

http://disq.us/url?url=http%3A%2F%2Fexample.com...

Is there some way I can defeat this so Disqus won't track my clicks?

Submission + - Professors claim passive cooling breakthrough via plastic film (economist.com)

charlesj68 writes: An article in the Economist discusses the development of a plastic film by two professors at the University of Colorado in Boulder that provides a passive cooling effect. The film contains embedded glass beads that absorb and emit infrared in a wavelength that is not blocked by the atmosphere. Combining this with half-silvering to keep the sun from being the source of infrared absorption on the part of the beads, and you have way of pumping heat at a claimed rate of 93 watts per square meter.
Actual paper in Science: http://science.sciencemag.org/...
Original research by others in Nature: http://www.nature.com/nature/j...

Submission + - World's Largest Spam Botnet Adds DDoS Feature (bleepingcomputer.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Necurs, the world's largest spam botnet with nearly five million infected bots, of which one million active each day, has added a new module that can be used for launching DDoS attacks. The sheer size of the Necurs botnet, even in its worst days, dwarfs all of today's IoT botnets, who barely managed to reach 400,000 (albeit the owner of that botnet has now been arrested).

If this new feature would ever to be used, a Necurs DDoS atack would easily break every DDoS record there is. Fortunately, no such attack has been seen until now. Until now, the Necurs botnet has been seen spreading the Dridex banking trojan and the Locky ransomware. According to industry experts, there's a low chance to see the Necurs botnet engage in DDoS attacks because the criminal group behind the botnet is already making too much money to risk exposing their full infrastructure in DDoS attacks.

Submission + - Security lapse exposed New York airport's critical servers for a year (zdnet.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A security lapse at a New York international airport left its server backups exposed on the open internet for almost a year, ZDNet has found.

Khalil Sehnaoui, founder of Krypton Security, and Brad "Renderman" Haines, a hacker and security researcher, analyzed the password file and a network schematic found among the files to determine the reach of a potential attacker.

"The password file would give us full access to every component of the internal network," said Sehnaoui.

But in the wrong hands, it could also be used to issue valid boarding passes to people on the "no-fly" list, a government watchlist that prevents possible terrorists from boarding flights, he said.

"You could access the database of travelers and know who is going where and when, and get a list of the passenger's data, such as names and passport numbers," said Haines.

Or, worst case scenario, hackers could shut down airport operations, stranding passengers on the ground, the researchers say.

Submission + - Mirai evolves as Windows-based spreader is discovered on 500 systems

ericjon writes: A Windows-based spreader for Mirai malware has been discovered by Kaspersky Lab, whose engineers were analysing the spreader in a recently published blog post.
Kaspersky analysis showed the spreader on 500 unique systems so far this year. Although those attempts were blocked, researchers warn that emerging markets currently investing in connected technology are particularly vulnerable. The Lab is reportedly working with CERTs in order to take emerging IoT botnets down. .Source

Submission + - Early Apple internal memos found at Seattle thrift shop (blogspot.com)

An anonymous reader writes: "I was at the Seattle Goodwill outlet recently and I noticed the Apple logo on letterhead sticking out from a bin of books, so I started digging. What I found were the 1979-1980 files of Jack MacDonald, manager of system software for the Apple II and /// at the time.

"They tell the story of project "SSAFE" or "Software Security from Apples Friends and Enemies." This was a proposal to bring disk copy protection in-house to sell as a service to outside developers. Inter-office memos, meeting notes and progress reports all give a good idea of what a project life cycle looked like. Different schemes and levels of protection are considered, as well as implementation primarily on the Apple II+ and the upcoming SARA (The Apple ///) and Lisa computers."

Submission + - Study Reveals Bot-On-Bot Editing Wars Raging On Wikipedia's Pages (theguardian.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A new study from computer scientists has found that the online encyclopedia is a battleground where silent wars have raged for years. Since Wikipedia launched in 2001, its millions of articles have been ranged over by software robots, or simply “bots," that are built to mend errors, add links to other pages, and perform other basic housekeeping tasks. In the early days, the bots were so rare they worked in isolation. But over time, the number deployed on the encyclopedia exploded with unexpected consequences. The more the bots came into contact with one another, the more they became locked in combat, undoing each other’s edits and changing the links they had added to other pages. Some conflicts only ended when one or other bot was taken out of action. The findings emerged from a study that looked at bot-on-bot conflict in the first ten years of Wikipedia’s existence. The researchers at Oxford and the Alan Turing Institute in London examined the editing histories of pages in 13 different language editions and recorded when bots undid other bots’ changes. While some conflicts mirrored those found in society, such as the best names to use for contested territories, others were more intriguing. Describing their research in a paper entitled Even Good Bots Fight in the journal Plos One, the scientists reveal that among the most contested articles were pages on former president of Pakistan Pervez Musharraf, the Arabic language, Niels Bohr and Arnold Schwarzenegger. One of the most intense battles played out between Xqbot and Darknessbot which fought over 3,629 different articles between 2009 and 2010. Over the period, Xqbot undid more than 2,000 edits made by Darknessbot, with Darknessbot retaliating by undoing more than 1,700 of Xqbot’s changes. The two clashed over pages on all sorts of topics, from Alexander of Greece and Banqiao district in Taiwan to Aston Villa football club.

Submission + - UK Police Arrest Suspect Behind Mirai Malware Attacks on Deutsche Telekom (bleepingcomputer.com)

An anonymous reader writes: German police announced today that fellow UK police officers have arrested a suspect behind a serious cyber-attack that crippled German ISP Deutsche Telekom at the end of November 2016. The attack in question caused over 900,000 routers of various makes and models to go offline after a mysterious attacker attempted to hijack the devices through a series of vulnerabilities.

The attacks were later linked to a cybercrime groups operating a botnet powered by the Mirai malware, known as Botnet #14, which was also available for hire online for on-demand DDoS attacks.

According to a statement obtained by Bleeping Computer from Bundeskriminalamt (the German Federal Criminal Police Office), officers from UK's National Crime Agency (NCA) arrested yesterday a 29-year-old suspect at a London airport. German authorities are now in the process of requesting the unnamed suspect's extradition, so he can stand trial in Germany. Bestbuy, the name of the hacker that took credit for the attacks has been unreachable for days.

Comment Solution: suspend "trusted" status (Score 1) 81

When you (Google) detect that a medium- or high-volume submitter has "obvious flaws" in more than a very small percentage of its submissions, suspend their "trusted sender" status until the flaws are fixed.

Ditto if more than a small percentage of a medium- or high-volume submitter's requests get overturned or "overturned by default" by an un-challenged counter-notice.

For low-volume submitters, the "kick out" threshold would need to be much higher, something like "5 bad submissions out of the last 10 or 10 bad submissions out of the last 100," along with a "you can't become 'trusted' until we see at least 10 consecutive submissions that aren't challenged and at least 90% of the ones submitted in the last month are okay."

If the legal requirements of the DMCA prevent this, then take "bad submitters" to court and get a court order declaring that you (Google) can ignore requests from that submitter that haven't been approved by the court.

Slashdot Top Deals

"For a male and female to live continuously together is... biologically speaking, an extremely unnatural condition." -- Robert Briffault

Working...