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Submission + - South Korean Court Dismisses Arrest Warrant For Samsung Chief (reuters.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A South Korean court on Thursday dismissed an arrest warrant against the head of Samsung Group, the country's largest conglomerate, amid a graft scandal that has led to the impeachment of President Park Geun-hye. But the reprieve for Jay Y. Lee, 48, may only be temporary, as the special prosecutor's office said it would pursue the case. Lee, who has led Samsung since his father, Lee Kun-hee, suffered a heart attack in 2014, was still likely to face the same charges of bribery, embezzlement and perjury, legal analysts said, even if he is not detained. The special prosecutor's office said it would be continuing its probe but had not decided whether to make another arrest warrant request, and the setback would not change its plans to investigate other conglomerates. Spokesman Lee Kyu-chul said the prosecution was unconvinced by the Samsung chief's argument that he was a victim of coercion due to pressure from Park. The office has accused Lee of paying multi-million dollar bribes to Park's confidant, Choi Soon-sil, the woman at the heart of the scandal, to win support from the National Pension Service for a controversial 2015 merger of two Samsung Group affiliates. The merger helped cement Lee's control over the smartphones-to-biopharmaceuticals business empire.

Submission + - Neuroscience Does Not Compute (economist.com)

mspohr writes: The Economist has an interesting story about two neuroscientists/engineers who decided to test the methods of neuroscience using a 6502 processor. Their results are published in the PLOS Computational Biology journal.
Neuroscientists explore how the brain works by looking at damaged brains and monitoring inputs and outputs to try to infer intermediate processing. They did the same with the 6502 processor which was used in early Atari, Apple and Commodore computers.
What they discovered was that these methods were sorely lacking in that they often pointed in the wrong direction and missed important processing steps.

Submission + - Air Force goes after cyber deception technology (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: A little cyber-trickery is a good thing when it comes to battling network adversaries. The Air Force Research Lab (AFRL) tapped into that notion today as it awarded a $750,000 grant to security systems developer Galios to develop a cyber deception system that will “dramatically reduce the capabilities of an attacker that has gained a foothold on a network.”

Submission + - Galileo satellites experiencing multiple clock failures (bbc.com)

elgatozorbas writes: According to a BBC article, the onboard atomic clocks that drive the satellite-navigation signals on Europe's Galileo network have been failing at an alarming rate.

Across the 18 satellites now in orbit, nine clocks have stopped operating. Three are traditional rubidium devices; six are the more precise hydrogen maser instruments that were designed to give Galileo superior performance to the American GPS network.

Submission + - Server Ransom Attacks Hit CouchDB, Hadoop, and ElasticSearch Servers (bleepingcomputer.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Two weeks after cybercriminal groups started to hijack and hold for ransom MongoDB servers, similar attacks are now taking place against CouchDB, Hadoop, and ElasticSearch servers. According to the latest tallies, the number of hijacked MongoDB servers is 34,000 (out of 69,000 available on Shodan), 4,600 ElasticSearch clusters (out of 33,000), 124 Hadoop datastores (out of 5,400), and 443 CouchDB databases (out of 4,600).

Furthermore, the group that has hijacked the most MongoDB and ElasticSearch servers, is also selling the scripts it used for the attacks.

Submission + - Alberta Man Turns Table on Laptop Thief (nationalpost.com)

jbwiebe writes: Cochrane’s Stu Gale couldn’t believe his eyes when a notification popped up on his computer telling him someone had logged on to his recently stolen laptop.

The B.C.-based 51-year-old computer security and automation expert couldn’t let the opportunity to try to find out something about the apparent thief pass him by, so he attempted to remotely log on to the pilfered laptop.

Submission + - The backlash against self-driving cars officially begins (cnn.com)

Paul Fernhout writes: "An organization that advocates for professional drivers has urged New York to ban self-driving cars from the state's roads for 50 years. The Upstate Transportation Association fears that self-driving cars will eliminate thousands of jobs and damage the local economy."

Submission + - Ask /. Should I sign permission slip so my kid can use Google Apps at school? (google.com)

McGruber writes: My childrens' public elementary school recently acquired 100 Chromebooks and is using Google Apps for Education (GAFE) [https://www.google.com/edu/products/productivity-tools/]. As part of the rollout, the school emailed this to parents:

[School] now has over 100 ChromeBooks that teachers can use in their classrooms for a variety of purposes. Teachers and students will have access to Google Apps for Education (GAFE) as a tool for learning, creativity, and critical thinking. In preparation for the roll-out of this great resource, we ask all parents to give permission for classroom instructional use. Please take a moment and complete the form sent home last week in the Friday Folder and return it to your child's teacher.

The permission slip asks us to sign-away some of the protections provided by the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) and Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). It says:
---------------------------
COPPA applies to commercial companies and limits their ability to collect personal information from children under 13. This permission form allows the school to act as an agent for parents in the collection of information within the school context. The school's use of student information is solely for education purposes.

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) FERPA protects the privacy of student education records and gives parents the rights to review student records. Signing this form acknowledges that some student records, such as portfolios of student work with teacher feedback, may be stored in a student’s GAFE accounts on Google servers.
---------------------------

Should we, the parents, sign this form? If not, how do we explain to the school leadership why we declined to grant permission?

Submission + - NASA Mission Asteroid for Metals Worth Ten Thousand Quadrillion Dollars

randomErr writes: NASA wants to uncover the mystery behind the asteroid “16 Psyche.” that may contain a priceless treasure trove of minerals. “We’ve been to all the different planets, we’ve been to other asteroids. But we’ve never visited a body that has been made of entirely metal,” said Carol Polanskey, project scientist for the Psyche mission. Now NASA, led by researchers at Arizona State University, plans to send an unmanned spacecraft to orbit 16 Psyche – an asteroid roughly the size of Massachusetts, made of iron and other precious metals. The mission’s leader estimates that the iron alone on today’s market would be worth $10,000 quadrillion.

Submission + - Financial Services Company Automates 17,000 Low-End Jobs Without Layoffs (thestack.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Financial Services company Accenture claims that it has automated 17,000 back-office jobs without laying off any employees, instead anticipating the switch and retraining the staff early into higher-difficulty roles. The company's CEO Richard Lumb, who has recently presented a report with an uncommonly optimistic vision for how AI and automation can benefit companies and workers, said "Over the last 18 months, automation replaced 17,000 jobs in back office processing. But actually, we haven’t laid those people off. We are fortunate enough to reskill and reposition them."

Submission + - Massive Oracle Critical Patch Update Fixes 270 Vulnerabilities (helpnetsecurity.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Oracle has released the first Critical Patch Update scheduled for 2017, and it’s massive.

“This quarter, more than 100 patches address vulnerabilities in Oracle E-Business Suite (Oracle’s main business software developed), and 97% of them may be remotely exploitable without authentication,” the ERPScan research team noted. "“The focus has shifted from Database and Java SE to critical business applications."

Comment Let your heart lead you to your career (Score 1) 538

Why go into engineering when management or sales pays double for less work?

Because, if you are in a good work environment in a good company, it's a whole lot more fun to follow your heart than to follow your wallet.

For those whose hearts lead them to engineering and who are fortunate enough to have a good work environment in a good company, there's plenty of reasons to stay rather than go with a less-work/higher-paying position in management or sales.

On the other hand, if your heart isn't in engineering, you probably shouldn't be there. If it is in engineering but you are in a lousy work environment or lousy company, change employers, not careers.

Submission + - Congress Will Consider Proposal To Raise H-1B Minimum Wage To $100,000 (arstechnica.com)

An anonymous reader writes: President-elect Donald Trump is just a week away from taking office. From the start of his campaign, he has promised big changes to the US immigration system. For both Trump's advisers and members of Congress, the H-1B visa program, which allows many foreign workers to fill technology jobs, is a particular focus. One major change to that system is already under discussion: making it harder for companies to use H-1B workers to replace Americans by simply giving the foreign workers a raise. The "Protect and Grow American Jobs Act," introduced last week by Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif. and Scott Peters, D-Calif., would significantly raise the wages of workers who get H-1B visas. If the bill becomes law, the minimum wage paid to H-1B workers would rise to at least $100,000 annually, and be adjusted it for inflation. Right now, the minimum is $60,000. The sponsors say that would go a long way toward fixing some of the abuses of the H-1B program, which critics say is currently used to simply replace American workers with cheaper, foreign workers. In 2013, the top nine companies acquiring H-1B visas were technology outsourcing firms, according to an analysis by a critic of the H-1B program. (The 10th is Microsoft.) The thinking goes that if minimum H-1B salaries are brought closer to what high-skilled tech employment really pays, the economic incentive to use it as a worker-replacement program will drop off. "We need to ensure we can retain the world’s best and brightest talent," said Issa in a statement about the bill. "At the same time, we also need to make sure programs are not abused to allow companies to outsource and hire cheap foreign labor from abroad to replace American workers." The H-1B program offers 65,000 visas each fiscal year, with an additional 20,000 reserved for foreign workers who have advanced degrees from US colleges and universities. The visas are awarded by lottery each year. Last year, the government received more than 236,000 applications for those visas.

Comment Programming/IT will be automatable in 10 years (Score 3, Insightful) 409

I tell teenagers who want to go into IT or computers for a career to only do it if they really want to. If they are doing it for the high salaries, they are taking a big risk.

You will still have a need for low-level customer-service work and high-level design/research work in 20 years.

The mid-level stuff that your run-of-the-mill programmer and system administrator does today will be largely be automated.

Hopefully, new, fun, decent-paying tech jobs that use similar parts of the brain that we haven't even thought of will fill the void.

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